1 week to study for mocks - help

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nara.her
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i'm struggling particularly in english as i'm unsure if i'll be able to finish all my english literature revision properly. does anyone have any tips for english revision and quick revision in general? i've already studied about half of the content, except for english, where i'm especially finding english literature revision challenging.

any tips?
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fiixnaa
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(Original post by nara.her)
i'm struggling particularly in english as i'm unsure if i'll be able to finish all my english literature revision properly. does anyone have any tips for english revision and quick revision in general? i've already studied about half of the content, except for english, where i'm especially finding english literature revision challenging.

any tips?
Are you talking about GCSE English Literature?

Eng Lit can be a hard subject to revise for as a lot of it depends on your exam technique, but I think it comes down to a mixture of your knowledge of the texts (e.g. quotes) and the content as well as the achievement objectives for each question in the exam. This is useful in helping you to know how you structure your answer, especially your essays (e.g. For my edexcel English Literature exam, I knew the achievement objective for one of the questions did not specify context or evaluation and only marked based on your analysis of the literary techniques so I used a TEAR (Technique, Evidence/Example, Analysis, Reader Response) structure for my paragraphs). Knowing how to structure your answer can help make your answers easier to mark for the examiner and also ensures you hit the marking points.

To revise for the content (e.g. your required texts and poems), I would suggest using flashcards or mindmaps. Knowing the themes in your texts helps your analysis so much as it gives you a lot more to talk about. You can memorise quotes using flashcards and analyse the techniques and their effect and keep these points on one side of the flashcard. Memorisation is important if your exam board has questions where you aren't given the text and have to rely solely on your memory of the quotes and the literary techniques in them.

I'd also suggest reading examiner reports and also reading exemplar essays because they give you the clearest idea of what things to improve on and include to achieve higher grades. These are things our teacher suggested my class to do when I did my GCSEs. (:
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Alienated.
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(Original post by nara.her)
i'm struggling particularly in english as i'm unsure if i'll be able to finish all my english literature revision properly. does anyone have any tips for english revision and quick revision in general? i've already studied about half of the content, except for english, where i'm especially finding english literature revision challenging.

any tips?
I bloody hated that ******* Shitspeare.
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nara.her
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(Original post by fiixnaa)
Are you talking about GCSE English Literature?

Eng Lit can be a hard subject to revise for as a lot of it depends on your exam technique, but I think it comes down to a mixture of your knowledge of the texts (e.g. quotes) and the content as well as the achievement objectives for each question in the exam. This is useful in helping you to know how you structure your answer, especially your essays (e.g. For my edexcel English Literature exam, I knew the achievement objective for one of the questions did not specify context or evaluation and only marked based on your analysis of the literary techniques so I used a TEAR (Technique, Evidence/Example, Analysis, Reader Response) structure for my paragraphs). Knowing how to structure your answer can help make your answers easier to mark for the examiner and also ensures you hit the marking points.

To revise for the content (e.g. your required texts and poems), I would suggest using flashcards or mindmaps. Knowing the themes in your texts helps your analysis so much as it gives you a lot more to talk about. You can memorise quotes using flashcards and analyse the techniques and their effect and keep these points on one side of the flashcard. Memorisation is important if your exam board has questions where you aren't given the text and have to rely solely on your memory of the quotes and the literary techniques in them.

I'd also suggest reading examiner reports and also reading exemplar essays because they give you the clearest idea of what things to improve on and include to achieve higher grades. These are things our teacher suggested my class to do when I did my GCSEs. (:
this is very helpful, ty! i'm doing igcse english literature edexcel, so I've made analysis grids for comparisons of poems including quotes as evidence, I'm broadly memorising and reading over the effects of each quote and how they contribute to a particular theme, as well as making flashcards with quotes with more lengthy analysis. is this a good technique? I'm also starting to make essay/ question plans for specific past paper questions, so as to not have to answer whole questions.
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fiixnaa
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(Original post by nara.her)
this is very helpful, ty! i'm doing igcse english literature edexcel, so I've made analysis grids for comparisons of poems including quotes as evidence, I'm broadly memorising and reading over the effects of each quote and how they contribute to a particular theme, as well as making flashcards with quotes with more lengthy analysis. is this a good technique? I'm also starting to make essay/ question plans for specific past paper questions, so as to not have to answer whole questions.
Preparing your comparisons for your poetry essay is really good - I'm not sure how the iGCSE exams do it but I remember in my Edexcel exam, the poetry questions were worth quite a lot of marks so preparation is key. Our teacher suggested we memorise as many poems (from start to finish) as we could and then memorise analysis points for them but I thought this was a bit unrealistic and if you're short on time for your mocks, then I wouldn't suggest this. What I did instead was similar to you: I just made tables and compared the poems and included quotes and analysis for each. For my exam, we were given one poem and then we had to choose our own to compare it with so memorising quotes and their literary techniques and context was important so I think your flashcard method should help.

For essay plans, I think this is a good strategy for the essay questions. Exam technique will only improve with practice after all and as your mocks are quickly approaching, not answering the whole question will save time. I would also suggest for your real GCSE exam to look at the past questions and the themes/texts that they've asked and chosen before to help you focus your revision (but be careful, don't ignore what's been asked in the past entirely). For example, in 2018 Edexcel used A Poison Tree by William Blake for the comparisons of poem question so in 2019, I knew that I shouldn't focus too much on it because it wouldn't come up again.
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