snazsey
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So I'm probably gonna take a-levels. Does anybody know what would be some good ones relating to my career that doesn't involve maths or science? And also do they care what a levels I take because I was thinking of art, English lit, and psychology. Also, would I be better of getting a degree in graphic design compared to game art which I think would be too specific and difficult to get a job? Or would taking a degree in game art be more beneficial?
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txashe1
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i cant help you with the degree question, but in terms of a levels, it doesn't really matter if the courses you pick do not relate to what you want to do in the future, its best you pick subjects you enjoy.

and I also recommend taking some sort of computer/IT course as well
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aspalax
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(Original post by snazsey)
So I'm probably gonna take a-levels. Does anybody know what would be some good ones relating to my career that doesn't involve maths or science? And also do they care what a levels I take because I was thinking of art, English lit, and psychology. Also, would I be better of getting a degree in graphic design compared to game art which I think would be too specific and difficult to get a job? Or would taking a degree in game art be more beneficial?
Hey, you totally don't need maths or computer science to do Game Art I studied Art, Graphics & English lit and it's been totally fine. Generally all art-based courses like Game Art or Graphic Design will ask for an A level in a creative subject or BTEC equivalent, e.g. art, graphics or design tech A level or game design/art BTEC. As for employability, I think it's definitely easier to go into the games industry from a game art course, and as long as you go to a good uni for game art and work hard, it isn't too much of a concern. If you go into graphic design, you might have more employability in other creative areas, but you'll probably struggle to get into the games industry because they look for specific skills.
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snazsey
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(Original post by txashe1)
i cant help you with the degree question, but in terms of a levels, it doesn't really matter if the courses you pick do not relate to what you want to do in the future, its best you pick subjects you enjoy.

and I also recommend taking some sort of computer/IT course as well
That's good advice, thank you
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snazsey
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(Original post by aspalax)
Hey, you totally don't need maths or computer science to do Game Art I studied Art, Graphics & English lit and it's been totally fine. Generally all art-based courses like Game Art or Graphic Design will ask for an A level in a creative subject or BTEC equivalent, e.g. art, graphics or design tech A level or game design/art BTEC. As for employability, I think it's definitely easier to go into the games industry from a game art course, and as long as you go to a good uni for game art and work hard, it isn't too much of a concern. If you go into graphic design, you might have more employability in other creative areas, but you'll probably struggle to get into the games industry because they look for specific skills.
There was a game art course I really wanted to do at De Montford that I looked into but I was scared my options would be too closed off however I think I'll probably take that if it's preferred and I would probably enjoy the course more. Also I was wondering how working as game artist works, do you usually work at home or an office, and is it difficult to get in?
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by snazsey)
There was a game art course I really wanted to do at De Montford that I looked into but I was scared my options would be too closed off however I think I'll probably take that if it's preferred and I would probably enjoy the course more. Also I was wondering how working as game artist works, do you usually work at home or an office, and is it difficult to get in?
It would depend if you're freelance or on a contract, as a freelancer you may not need to go into an office and they may just send you the material to do from wherever you are based. If you are a contracted (or permanent) employee you would probably go into the game studio's offices and work from there, at least some of the time, although some may offer opportunities to work flexibly from home in particular situations.

My impression is it can be hard to get in the door initially, but once you have some experience on delivering a completed project you'll probably find it easier to get further work, although getting a full time permanent contract at a major studio is still probably pretty tough. As with all creative arts careers, networking will be critical in getting yourself established and developing a steady stream of work as a freelancer, that would then probably form the basis for applications to longer term contract positions or permanent positions.
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aspalax
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(Original post by snazsey)
There was a game art course I really wanted to do at De Montford that I looked into but I was scared my options would be too closed off however I think I'll probably take that if it's preferred and I would probably enjoy the course more. Also I was wondering how working as game artist works, do you usually work at home or an office, and is it difficult to get in?
that's my course! i'm currently a first year at DMU game art they do degree exhibitions and havw regular visits from industry professionals- theres an 86% employment rate out of university which is really good for an art based course.

artful_lounger is right, if you freelance you'll probably work remotely but all major companies will have offices. Playground, Ubisoft and EA hire quite a lot of DMU graduates and they all have base offices.

DMU prep you for industry- as long as you work hard & engage with the opportunities they give you, you'll be just fine.
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ysd7k
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(Original post by snazsey)
So I'm probably gonna take a-levels. Does anybody know what would be some good ones relating to my career that doesn't involve maths or science? And also do they care what a levels I take because I was thinking of art, English lit, and psychology. Also, would I be better of getting a degree in graphic design compared to game art which I think would be too specific and difficult to get a job? Or would taking a degree in game art be more beneficial?
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