tyresedenise
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My question is:
Through a close analysis of Thetis explore how Duffy conveys her ideas to the reader, and examine the charge that Duffy depicts a purely negative view of heterosexual relationships in this poem and in the collection as a whole.

How could I structure this and what could I include?
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A.Peters0797
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(Original post by tyresedenise)
My question is:
Through a close analysis of Thetis explore how Duffy conveys her ideas to the reader, and examine the charge that Duffy depicts a purely negative view of heterosexual relationships in this poem and in the collection as a whole.

How could I structure this and what could I include?
I'd suggest starting by writing about the Thetis poem, and write about 1 or 2 aspects that lead the reader to believe that Duffy has a negative attitude towards heterosexual relationship.

Then pick a couple of other poems that give you the same impression and say how these are similar, maybe even dissimilar, and pick a few quotes from each of those poems that make you think that they're so similar.

So you could maybe talk about how, at the start of Thetis, Duffy refers to herself as a tiny bird in her relationship, and refers to her partner as a wolf in Little Red Cap. In Thetis, her comparison between herself and a tiny bird has innocent connotations, and to feel squished like that is quite upsetting and makes us sympathise with her and her relationship. Referring to the male figure as a 'wolf' in Little Red Cap makes us think that he's a dangerous character, because the title of Little Red Cap seems to be play on words for Little Red Riding Hood, and, at the end of this traditional story, the child is attacked by the wolf. Maybe Duffy is trying to imply similar?

Really hope this helps!
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Melancholy
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I mean, it’s a “poem” which doesn’t even bloody rhyme in most places! Try harder Miss Christmas Carol Ann Daffy Duck.

I think she’s making a wider point about how she dislikes men because they are brutal. I therefore apologise for my lashing out and calling her a duck as it helps prove her point, but it reflects my disappointment and frustration that she doesn’t use much rhyme in her poem. Also her implied generalisation. Not all men are brutal - she’s insulting, maybe due to her personal experiences (e.g. she is a lesbian - though there’s an unfair generalist assumption I’ve hypocritically built in there).

The poem is ambiguous. I think a baby explodes out at the end or something - maybe a male baby that she likes (did she forget that birds lay eggs tho?). Very Greek/Roman/classic imagery - a snake appears out of nowhere. Such a crafty thing.

Explore the use of the title “Thetis”. Always a rich source of narrative and juicy point-scoring analysis - God of Nature. Oooooh. Lots of powerful nature in the poem mate. Also a bit like foetus. She doesn’t like punctuation or capital letters much does she? So edgy. Disrespects traditional literary rules and other orders, like marriage and historic patriarchy. One word lines in her poem occasionally - a Carol Ann Duffy classic. That sort of thing helps you become a national poet for a decade.

She supported the Labour Party - much like other working class Scots who become well-known. Not sure if she does support them now. Not connected to any labour/pregnancy in her writing - don’t make that mistake mate.

If we do some unpacking, it’s obviously about a journey which includes struggles. You can apply that to marriages as an institution which many on the left (and Catholically-raised atheists) stare and frown upon with such serious eyes and crinkled faces and sore cheek muscles from such frowning and forlorn gestures and shrugged shoulders like depressed, hopeless, ineffectual revolutionaries. She’s hunching during the writing of this poem mate. Carol Ann Hunchy. She didn’t just want to write “I hate traditional heterosexual marriage” because it wouldn’t advance her reputation as a cryptic, educated and much-discussed (owing to ambiguity) poet. She’s at least slightly commercially driven.

She starts out as a small bird in the hand of a man’s fist which grips. That’s quite explicit. All these male characters are threatening her (e.g. the fisherman) when she changes into silly shapes and creatures (e.g. a snake when she’s above a lap - poor judgement - I shake my head as a reader every time I read that line, which I do many times as I re-read often for days in disbelief). But she becomes happy at the end when (implied) an urchin is born.

It’s not a bad poem in my humble view. Such nice imagery at times. Just use more rhymes, Carol Ann Duffy. Use rhyme. Makes it more enjoyable.

She was a small bird but didn’t find the right tree to land on. It was the bird that caused its own struggle. But let’s not victim blame. The males were too alpha and needed to become gentleman. But maybe that’s a class thing. Who knows? Such space for continuous literary discussion with nice wines and sumptuous foods. Foods. Like cooked birds, though that’d be insensitive and make us feel guilty as readers. The subject matter is not trivial.
Last edited by Melancholy; 2 months ago
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Kater Murr
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(Original post by Melancholy)
I mean, it’s a “poem” which doesn’t even bloody rhyme in most places! Try harder Miss Christmas Carol Ann Daffy Duck.

I think she’s making a wider point about how she dislikes men because they are brutal. I therefore apologise for my lashing out and calling her a duck as it helps prove her point, but it reflects my disappointment and frustration that she doesn’t use much rhyme in her poem. Also her implied generalisation. Not all men are brutal - she’s insulting, maybe due to her personal experiences (e.g. she is a lesbian - though there’s an unfair generalist assumption I’ve hypocritically built in there).

The poem is ambiguous. I think a baby explodes out at the end or something - maybe a male baby that she likes (did she forget that birds lay eggs tho?). Very Greek/Roman/classic imagery - a snake appears out of nowhere. Such a crafty thing.

Explore the use of the title “Thetis”. Always a rich source of narrative and juicy point-scoring analysis - God of Nature. Oooooh. Lots of powerful nature in the poem mate. Also a bit like foetus. She doesn’t like punctuation or capital letters much does she? So edgy. Disrespects traditional literary rules and other orders, like marriage and historic patriarchy. One word lines in her poem occasionally - a Carol Ann Duffy classic. That sort of thing helps you become a national poet for a decade.

She supported the Labour Party - much like other working class Scots who become well-known. Not sure if she does support them now. Not connected to any labour/pregnancy in her writing - don’t make that mistake mate.

If we do some unpacking, it’s obviously about a journey which includes struggles. You can apply that to marriages as an institution which many on the left (and Catholically-raised atheists) stare and frown upon with such serious eyes and crinkled faces and sore cheek muscles from such frowning and forlorn gestures and shrugged shoulders like depressed, hopeless, ineffectual revolutionaries. She’s hunching during the writing of this poem mate. Carol Ann Hunchy. She didn’t just want to write “I hate traditional heterosexual marriage” because it wouldn’t advance her reputation as a cryptic, educated and much-discussed (owing to ambiguity) poet. She’s at least slightly commercially driven.

She starts out as a small bird in the hand of a man’s fist which grips. That’s quite explicit. All these male characters are threatening her (e.g. the fisherman) when she changes into silly shapes and creatures (e.g. a snake when she’s above a lap - poor judgement - I shake my head as a reader every time I read that line, which I do many times as I re-read often for days in disbelief). But she becomes happy at the end when (implied) an urchin is born.

It’s not a bad poem in my humble view. Such nice imagery at times. Just use more rhymes, Carol Ann Duffy. Use rhyme. Makes it more enjoyable.

She was a small bird but didn’t find the right tree to land on. It was the bird that caused its own struggle. But let’s not victim blame. The males were too alpha and needed to become gentleman. But maybe that’s a class thing. Who knows? Such space for continuous literary discussion with nice wines and sumptuous foods. Foods. Like cooked birds, though that’d be insensitive and make us feel guilty as readers. The subject matter is not trivial.
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