Getting my Bachelors degree in London or Manchester as an American

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noraaaam1
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#1
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#1
Hey! I am going to soon start applying to schools undergraduate programs. My plan is to apply to a couple of schools in both cities, and then once I get accepted, defer my application so I'm able to begin my first year in Spring of 2022. Does that sound like a plan? My biggest concern is the money aspect of it all especially because I am broke. The nice and helpful funding that the U.K government provides to U.K or EU students (the tuition and maintenance loans) does not apply to American students. So basically, I have to get a student loan from the U.S government. However, I do not know how I will fund anything like housing, groceries, transportation, getting my visa, renewing my visa, other fees, insurance, etc. I am so scared of the future. I don't think getting a part-job in the U.K will help me cover these large costs either. Please please give me advice! I will greatly appreciate it. If you know any American's who have gotten or are getting their bachelor's in the U.K please let me know! ;(((
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noraaaam
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#2
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#2
Hey! I am going to soon start applying to schools undergraduate programs. My plan is to apply to a couple of schools in both cities, and then once I get accepted, defer my application so I'm able to begin my first year in Spring of 2022. Does that sound like a plan? My biggest concern is the money aspect of it all especially because I am broke. The nice and helpful funding that the U.K government provides to U.K or EU students (the tuition and maintenance loans) does not apply to American students. So basically, I have to get a student loan from the U.S government. However, I do not know how I will fund anything like housing, groceries, transportation, getting my visa, renewing my visa, other fees, insurance, etc. I am so scared of the future. I don't think getting a part-job in the U.K will help me cover these large costs either. Please please give me advice! I will greatly appreciate it. If you know any American's who have gotten or are getting their bachelor's in the U.K please let me know! ;(((
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999tigger
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#3
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#3
(Original post by noraaaam1)
Hey! I am going to soon start applying to schools undergraduate programs. My plan is to apply to a couple of schools in both cities, and then once I get accepted, defer my application so I'm able to begin my first year in Spring of 2022. Does that sound like a plan? My biggest concern is the money aspect of it all especially because I am broke. The nice and helpful funding that the U.K government provides to U.K or EU students (the tuition and maintenance loans) does not apply to American students. So basically, I have to get a student loan from the U.S government. However, I do not know how I will fund anything like housing, groceries, transportation, getting my visa, renewing my visa, other fees, insurance, etc. I am so scared of the future. I don't think getting a part-job in the U.K will help me cover these large costs either. Please please give me advice! I will greatly appreciate it. If you know any American's who have gotten or are getting their bachelor's in the U.K please let me know! ;(((
Dont come until you have enough money to support yourself.
You wont get a visa anyway as you have to prove you cna support yourself without recourse to public funds.
I honestly wouldnmt come till 2022 anwya as CV19 has altered the student experience for the worse.

Not many courses start in the Spring of a year, they mostly start in September.
Youi can get a job for 20h a week but we are going to go into a recession so unless you have some special skills it could be hard (not impossible).

You can work out how much you will need in advance. There are US students on TSR or if you chose your uni, then you cna contact thier US societies.


Your first task is to get the grades you need.
You can then id the university and whether its Manchester or London. London is VV Expensive. Also London has some excellent unis and many not so excellent. If you do the research and make the right chopices then you can maximise your chances of a decent time. make the wrong choices and I dont think its worth coming.
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mnot
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#4
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#4
(Original post by noraaaam1)
Hey! I am going to soon start applying to schools undergraduate programs. My plan is to apply to a couple of schools in both cities, and then once I get accepted, defer my application so I'm able to begin my first year in Spring of 2022. Does that sound like a plan? My biggest concern is the money aspect of it all especially because I am broke. The nice and helpful funding that the U.K government provides to U.K or EU students (the tuition and maintenance loans) does not apply to American students. So basically, I have to get a student loan from the U.S government. However, I do not know how I will fund anything like housing, groceries, transportation, getting my visa, renewing my visa, other fees, insurance, etc. I am so scared of the future. I don't think getting a part-job in the U.K will help me cover these large costs either. Please please give me advice! I will greatly appreciate it. If you know any American's who have gotten or are getting their bachelor's in the U.K please let me know! ;(((
If money is an issue, why not get a degree in the US, perhaps your local State has a school you can get a scholarship to or good value for in-state students. Do well and then come over for an MSc, that way you only pay the large fees for 1 year.
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Telomere
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#5
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#5
Manchester is far less expensive a city to live well in than London, but neither city is fun to be broke in. You will be restricted to 20 hours a week part time work during term-time on your visa and a lot of competition for jobs, whereas at least back home you can work unrestricted. US degrees are also a hell of a lot easier to step on and off, whereas the UK model is quite rigid.

I'd suggest staying closer to home until your finances are in better shape.The advice about coming for a 1 year Masters is a good suggestion - or even as a year abroad student during your US degree.
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chloenix
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#6
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#6
I think it sounds like a great plan, don't worry! You just need to do a lot of research into it!

Firstly you definitely need to look into the universities and how good they are for your chosen degree. If you want to save money, I would heavily advise you NOT to go to London. Living costs are extremely high and there is no chance you will be able to afford it if you are already struggling. There are loads of other cities that offer more realistic living costs. Manchester is cheaper, albeit not the cheapest, but you could also look into the hundreds of UK universities that aren't based in cities, which I imagine are cheaper.

A part-time job would cover living costs I believe, but you might need to get a US student loan that covers accommodation too if that is possible.
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noraaaam
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#7
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#7
(Original post by chloenix)
I think it sounds like a great plan, don't worry! You just need to do a lot of research into it!

Firstly you definitely need to look into the universities and how good they are for your chosen degree. If you want to save money, I would heavily advise you NOT to go to London. Living costs are extremely high and there is no chance you will be able to afford it if you are already struggling. There are loads of other cities that offer more realistic living costs. Manchester is cheaper, albeit not the cheapest, but you could also look into the hundreds of UK universities that aren't based in cities, which I imagine are cheaper.

A part-time job would cover living costs I believe, but you might need to get a US student loan that covers accommodation too if that is possible.
Thank you so much for replying to my message and for that information! Are you currently a student right now, if so which city are you studying in?
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noraaaam
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#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by 999tigger)
Dont come until you have enough money to support yourself.
You wont get a visa anyway as you have to prove you cna support yourself without recourse to public funds.
I honestly wouldnmt come till 2022 anwya as CV19 has altered the student experience for the worse.

Not many courses start in the Spring of a year, they mostly start in September.
Youi can get a job for 20h a week but we are going to go into a recession so unless you have some special skills it could be hard (not impossible).

You can work out how much you will need in advance. There are US students on TSR or if you chose your uni, then you cna contact thier US societies.


Your first task is to get the grades you need.
You can then id the university and whether its Manchester or London. London is VV Expensive. Also London has some excellent unis and many not so excellent. If you do the research and make the right chopices then you can maximise your chances of a decent time. make the wrong choices and I dont think its worth coming.
Thank you for that advice! I guess the best thing to do is to begin thinking of a long-term plan for how exactly I can support myself while I am there. Another concern of mine is that I'll be 19 next month and still haven't gone to university yet. I feel like by the time I will be a first-year student at university, I will be 21 which is so far away. Also, does Manchester still have that city feel to it like London?
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noraaaam
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#9
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#9
(Original post by mnot)
If money is an issue, why not get a degree in the US, perhaps your local State has a school you can get a scholarship to or good value for in-state students. Do well and then come over for an MSc, that way you only pay the large fees for 1 year.
I do not like the education system at all in the U.S. The degree/major that you are aiming to study for is only truly taught to you during your last 2 years of University. Instead of taking 4 years to complete my bachelor's degree at a school in America, I would much rather spend only 3 years and have the experience of doing it in another country. A little backstory, I was enrolled as a freshman (first year) at a 4-year in-state school where I was only having to pay $3,500 U.S dollars per year (which is INSANELY cheap for a U.S school). However, I dropped all my classes in September (basically I dropped out of college). I didn't want to waste my time studying at a school that I was unhappy with because of the limited choices of degrees they had. I was more interested in pursuing a degree in something more creative (which my school didn't offer) instead of studying for a boring business degree. So, instead of going through with the rest of my semester at this school and wasting my time, I decided to drop out to dedicate the next year & a half to work my ass off to save a decent amount of money to go abroad. As much as I don't want to spend 20,000-25,000 U.S dollars per year at a U.K school (that is just the tuition alone), I have no choice because it is probably my best option of trying to integrate/live in the U.K after my studies. I am basically trying to move to the United Kingdom. I don't want to waste 4 years of my life at a school I will be miserable at, and THEN be able to go to the U.K to get my master's, you feel me?
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chloenix
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#10
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#10
(Original post by noraaaam)
Thank you so much for replying to my message and for that information! Are you currently a student right now, if so which city are you studying in?
I'm not a student but I'm in Year 13 (senior) applying to UK universities. I want to study in London, Exeter or Durham!
I wish I had more information to help you, but I honestly don't know too much about applying to study in the UK when you're from the US, but I think it's definitely possible.
What do you want to study?
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noraaaam
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Telomere)
Manchester is far less expensive a city to live well in than London, but neither city is fun to be broke in. You will be restricted to 20 hours a week part time work during term-time on your visa and a lot of competition for jobs, whereas at least back home you can work unrestricted. US degrees are also a hell of a lot easier to step on and off, whereas the UK model is quite rigid.

I'd suggest staying closer to home until your finances are in better shape.The advice about coming for a 1 year Masters is a good suggestion - or even as a year abroad student during your US degree.
I do not like the education system at all in the U.S. The degree/major that you are aiming to study for is only truly taught to you during your last 2 years of University. Instead of taking 4 years to complete my bachelor's degree at a school in America, I would much rather spend only 3 years and have the experience of doing it in another country. A little backstory, I was enrolled as a freshman (first year) at a 4-year in-state school where I was only having to pay $3,500 U.S dollars per year (which is INSANELY cheap for a U.S school). However, I dropped all my classes in September (basically I dropped out of college). I didn't want to waste my time studying at a school that I was unhappy with because of the limited choices of degrees they had. I was more interested in pursuing a degree in something more creative (which my school didn't offer) instead of studying for a boring business degree. So, instead of going through with the rest of my semester at this school and wasting my time, I decided to drop out to dedicate the next year & a half to work my ass off to save a decent amount of money to go abroad. As much as I don't want to spend 20,000-25,000 U.S dollars per year at a U.K school (that is just the tuition alone), I have no choice because it is probably my best option of trying to integrate/live in the U.K after my studies. I am basically trying to move to the United Kingdom. I don't want to waste 4 years of my life at a school I will be miserable at, and THEN be able to go to the U.K to get my master's, you feel me?
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noraaaam
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#12
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#12
(Original post by chloenix)
I'm not a student but I'm in Year 13 (senior) applying to UK universities. I want to study in London, Exeter or Durham!
I wish I had more information to help you, but I honestly don't know too much about applying to study in the UK when you're from the US, but I think it's definitely possible.
What do you want to study?
Ohh okay, that sounds so nice! It's okay, I understand. I feel like it is much more common to come to the U.K to get your Master's, but getting your bachelors seems to be much more uncommon. I can't find anyone on Youtube or the Internet who's committed a full 3 years in the U.K for their undergrads. Most people just come for either a semester or a year at most but don't actually end up getting their bachelor's degree from a U.K University. I really would like to study something on the more creative side. I am still doing my research because I also want to pick something that has a decent return on investment in the U.K especially if I am trying to live there after my studies. How about you, what do you want to study?
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threeportdrift
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#13
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#13
(Original post by noraaaam)
Hey! I am going to soon start applying to schools undergraduate programs. My plan is to apply to a couple of schools in both cities, and then once I get accepted, defer my application so I'm able to begin my first year in Spring of 2022. Does that sound like a plan? My biggest concern is the money aspect of it all especially because I am broke. The nice and helpful funding that the U.K government provides to U.K or EU students (the tuition and maintenance loans) does not apply to American students. So basically, I have to get a student loan from the U.S government. However, I do not know how I will fund anything like housing, groceries, transportation, getting my visa, renewing my visa, other fees, insurance, etc. I am so scared of the future. I don't think getting a part-job in the U.K will help me cover these large costs either. Please please give me advice! I will greatly appreciate it. If you know any American's who have gotten or are getting their bachelor's in the U.K please let me know! ;(((
Don't start in the Spring, it may be possible, but it's far from ideal. You are basically entirely out of step with the University experience. Wait until the standard 'fall' entry.
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hihi1111
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#14
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#14
(Original post by noraaaam)
Hey! I am going to soon start applying to schools undergraduate programs. My plan is to apply to a couple of schools in both cities, and then once I get accepted, defer my application so I'm able to begin my first year in Spring of 2022. Does that sound like a plan? My biggest concern is the money aspect of it all especially because I am broke. The nice and helpful funding that the U.K government provides to U.K or EU students (the tuition and maintenance loans) does not apply to American students. So basically, I have to get a student loan from the U.S government. However, I do not know how I will fund anything like housing, groceries, transportation, getting my visa, renewing my visa, other fees, insurance, etc. I am so scared of the future. I don't think getting a part-job in the U.K will help me cover these large costs either. Please please give me advice! I will greatly appreciate it. If you know any American's who have gotten or are getting their bachelor's in the U.K please let me know! ;(((
im currently in year 12 however i live very near to london and i can tell you its a lovely city. the only thing is the cost of living there is a lot higher than other cities. i advice you to look into other unis here and find the best ones for what you want to study. other places will be a lot cheaper and a part time job would cover all the costs. there is a lot of transportation here like trains, buses so you will get around easily and many supermarkets here like Lidl are low cost so that shouldnt be a worry. i dont know any americans personally who study here but ive seen a lot of americans move to here and other places in europe like italy and germany to study so its 100% possible for you to do ! the only thing is im pretty sure unis start in autumn/fall around september. what do you want to study and ill see if i can reccomend any unis ?
Last edited by hihi1111; 1 year ago
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noraaaam
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#15
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#15
(Original post by threeportdrift)
Don't start in the Spring, it may be possible, but it's far from ideal. You are basically entirely out of step with the University experience. Wait until the standard 'fall' entry.
So I should wait until Fall of 2022? I will be 19 soon and not at university. If I go by Fall of 2022, I will be nearly 21 and starting my first year then. Is that not odd?
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chloenix
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#16
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#16
(Original post by noraaaam)
Ohh okay, that sounds so nice! It's okay, I understand. I feel like it is much more common to come to the U.K to get your Master's, but getting your bachelors seems to be much more uncommon. I can't find anyone on Youtube or the Internet who's committed a full 3 years in the U.K for their undergrads. Most people just come for either a semester or a year at most but don't actually end up getting their bachelor's degree from a U.K University. I really would like to study something on the more creative side. I am still doing my research because I also want to pick something that has a decent return on investment in the U.K especially if I am trying to live there after my studies. How about you, what do you want to study?
I've actually seen loads of Americans studying in the UK for the full 3 years on TikTok, if I remembered their usernames I would send them to you but I genuinely do not remember But there will always be people with similar experiences to you.
But I do think it's a good idea. Just continue to send emails and make phone calls to enquire about the logistics of US loans. There might be some scholarships available for international students like you, too. You will find results eventually!
And I want to study Law!
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noraaaam
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#17
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#17
(Original post by hihi1111)
im currently in year 12 however i live very near to london and i can tell you its a lovely city. the only thing is the cost of living there is a lot higher than other cities. i advice you to look into other unis here and find the best ones for what you want to study. other places will be a lot cheaper and a part time job would cover all the costs. there is a lot of transportation here like trains, buses so you will get around easily and many supermarkets here like Lidl are low cost so that shouldnt be a worry. i dont know any americans personally who study here but ive seen a lot of americans move to here and other places in europe like italy and germany to study so its 100% possible for you to do ! the only thing is im pretty sure unis start in autumn/fall around september. what do you want to study and ill see if i can reccomend any unis ?
Thank you so much! Really, you think I would be able to cover all my other costs like accommodation, insurance, visa, miscellaneous, grocery, transportation, and going out by working a part-time (20 hr a week) job? Hmm, I want to study something on the more creative side like graphic design or something not so creative like public relations. Thanks again!!
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hihi1111
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#18
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#18
(Original post by noraaaam)
Thank you so much! Really, you think I would be able to cover all my other costs like accommodation, insurance, visa, miscellaneous, grocery, transportation, and going out by working a part-time (20 hr a week) job? Hmm, I want to study something on the more creative side like graphic design or something not so creative like public relations. Thanks again!!
yes 100% ! things can be cheap if you watch what you spend so most definitly. i want to study in sweden and have a part time job and that has a higher cost of living but honeslty anything is do-able if you really want it to happen. oo that sounds really interesting, im not too sure about what unis are good for that sorry but keep your options open. theres unis in leeds, brighton, edinburgh, norwich and so much more which do them courses. a lot of international students come here and honestly the uk is a nice place so im sure you'll love it here !!
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threeportdrift
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#19
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#19
(Original post by noraaaam)
So I should wait until Fall of 2022? I will be 19 soon and not at university. If I go by Fall of 2022, I will be nearly 21 and starting my first year then. Is that not odd?
Not at all odd. How many adults do you know who compare ages? It's a school kids thing 'Oh, they are the year ahead of me!' etc. Adults don't operate like that.

It's going to be wildly expensive though. I wouldn't pay to come and do something creative unless it was at one of the very top schools for that subject (and they will probably be in London). There just won't be the return on your investment.

Your best bet for bursaries/scholarships will be from the US, the UK doesn't have the same approach to philanthropy.
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ReadingMum
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#20
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#20
Forget starting in the spring - normal undergraduate courses start in September in the UK.
If money is tight I would discourage London.
I am not wishing to rain in your parade but you need to do quite a lot more research. In terms of finance, here are some numbers.
If you were a low income English student you could get the maximum maintenance loan which covers accommodation, food, travel, socialising, whatever. That would be just about £9k.
The minimum wage here is £6.45 per hour so a 20 hour a week job would bring in £129 pw so £6,708 per annum if you worked 52 weeks a year - too low to pay any tax. It would not be enough to live off if you need to cover extra things like visas. Hopefully you would get a job at higher than NMW but you shouldn't rely on it. You could also work full time in the holidays which could boost income - easier done if we are post COVID by then.
Will the US government cover your fees? Take a look at some uni websites - international fees are higher than for home students, sometimes A LOT higher.
Last edited by ReadingMum; 1 year ago
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