ex-cancer patient- can i handle PGCE?

Watch this thread
grachet1
Badges: 3
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hey everyone,

So I went through cancer a few years back.
Since then, my fitness level is lower than the average person, and I need to take care of myself (eat well, sleep well).

I'm doing a master's degree at the moment and planning to apply for PGCE secondary in the following few months.

I've been reading a lot of posts saying how intense the PGCE programme is, but I do notice some people saying they had free time during the weekends. The reviews are so different that I'm not sure what to expect.

My 60 credit master's degree right now is quite intensive too, and I'm barely managing it; I don't have a social life to make sure I get all my readings done in time, I take good rest in the middle, I make sure I get 8 hours of sleep etc.

I really want to teach, so it would be a pity to drop out in the middle because of the intensity of the programme (since a lot of ppl seem to).

Any advice or opinion on this matter?
0
reply
meaghan sharp
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
I think that it is quite intense, like your master's program. I wasn't able to keep up too much of a social life, but my dyslexia means that it takes me longer to do things than my peers.

my question to you is are there any providers that can allow you to study part-time? ie one term on one term off etc? Yes, it will take more time but if that is not a big barrier for you then it's worth it. if this was possible then the downtime between terms could be spent on self-initiated CPD on subjects etc that you struggled with or as a part pre-teach for yourself in prep for the next term.
0
reply
AN K
Badges: 0
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 11 months ago
#3
Hi,My syster is 52, single mother and was treated for cancer almost 5 years ago, she did a masters in translation after her treatment, it was very intense but she managed it, she then started a pgce in september 2020, and still have one month to go, it was moments whre she wanted to stop, she also had the option carryon on the next year, it was very tough but she did it, I was treated for cancer 3 years ago, and just got an offer, I will go ahead and give it all i could, its my dream.Good luck.
0
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 11 months ago
#4
(Original post by grachet1)
Hey everyone,

So I went through cancer a few years back.
Since then, my fitness level is lower than the average person, and I need to take care of myself (eat well, sleep well).

I'm doing a master's degree at the moment and planning to apply for PGCE secondary in the following few months.

I've been reading a lot of posts saying how intense the PGCE programme is, but I do notice some people saying they had free time during the weekends. The reviews are so different that I'm not sure what to expect.

My 60 credit master's degree right now is quite intensive too, and I'm barely managing it; I don't have a social life to make sure I get all my readings done in time, I take good rest in the middle, I make sure I get 8 hours of sleep etc.

I really want to teach, so it would be a pity to drop out in the middle because of the intensity of the programme (since a lot of ppl seem to).

Any advice or opinion on this matter?
Hi

When you are awarded a place on a PGCE, it is subject to a health assessment and occupational health can put support in place for you. Your uni may be able to do things like give you shorter commutes to help.

When you say you need to eat well and sleep well, what would be the consequences of missing lunch? Or struggling to sleep due to stress? Do you need opportunities to rest in the middle of the day?

If these things would have serious consequences for you, I'd suggest allowing your health to recover more before going for a PGCE. If you'd "just" feel more tired than the average person, a PGCE may be doable.

There are a small number of part time ITT courses run by SCITTs- if you have one local to you, this may be an option worth considering.

If it's of use to you, during my PGCE, I mostly had one free weekend day *however* this was not the case when I was applying for jobs and having to spend time on applications and interviews. I used to get up at about 6, and work pretty late into the evenings, though.

The nature of teaching and the PGCE mean that in term time, things are very intense, but you do get the holidays to recover.
1
reply
04MR17
Badges: 22
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#5
Report 11 months ago
#5
Hello,

I'm not an ex cancer patient but I have experience with health conditions affecting energy levels and PGCE.

Before Christmas I would work solidly Monday-Sunday. Didn't have any sort of life outside of school. Without realising it, I was unwell at that time due to my unknown diabetes, but I just-about-managed to keep up to date with lesson plans and paperwork for my placement school. Not a day went by when I wasn't working on PGCE and if I took a day slower it came back to bite me later that week.

In February I was diagnosed with type one diabetes during my PGCE year. The impact of me being ill and in hospital, and the impact of me trying to manage my condition and get used to it had a big impact on my energy levels and concentration. When my timetable increased as schools came back in March, I really couldn't cope with the workload. Eventually, a week after Easter, I sought help and got my timetable reduced so that I could make it to the end of my placement without losing my health.

This sounds like a very negative portrayal of a PGCE workload, but please remember that this is just my own experience, everyone else's will be different as every trainee is unique. ITT providers vary in their expectations as do schools and mentors. This is why you need to make sure the training provider and the school will meet your needs as a paying student and trainee.

Steps a training provider should and could be willing to put in place for you, in my opinion:
- Short commute where possible. Providers don't always have control over their options for placements.
- Reduced timetable and more incremental increases in timetables on placement (as was my experience)
- Greater support from a mentor in planning and marking workload
- Your health being an active part of your mentoring conversations

My other advice would be a recommendation that you try to ask about any lingering covid measures in school. You want to be within a small number of classrooms that are roughly in the same part of the school, not roaming the site all day due to covid measures still in place. *Hopefully* that way of operating a school will soon be behind us but be mindful (and worth mentioning this as a concern at some point) if you think a school might be that this is additional burden on your energy levels too.

Happy to answer questions about my own experience and I hope this helps,

MR
2
reply
SarcAndSpark
Badges: 20
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#6
Report 11 months ago
#6
(Original post by 04MR17)
Hello,

I'm not an ex cancer patient but I have experience with health conditions affecting energy levels and PGCE.

Before Christmas I would work solidly Monday-Sunday. Didn't have any sort of life outside of school. Without realising it, I was unwell at that time due to my unknown diabetes, but I just-about-managed to keep up to date with lesson plans and paperwork for my placement school. Not a day went by when I wasn't working on PGCE and if I took a day slower it came back to bite me later that week.

In February I was diagnosed with type one diabetes during my PGCE year. The impact of me being ill and in hospital, and the impact of me trying to manage my condition and get used to it had a big impact on my energy levels and concentration. When my timetable increased as schools came back in March, I really couldn't cope with the workload. Eventually, a week after Easter, I sought help and got my timetable reduced so that I could make it to the end of my placement without losing my health.

This sounds like a very negative portrayal of a PGCE workload, but please remember that this is just my own experience, everyone else's will be different as every trainee is unique. ITT providers vary in their expectations as do schools and mentors. This is why you need to make sure the training provider and the school will meet your needs as a paying student and trainee.

Steps a training provider should and could be willing to put in place for you, in my opinion:
- Short commute where possible. Providers don't always have control over their options for placements.
- Reduced timetable and more incremental increases in timetables on placement (as was my experience)
- Greater support from a mentor in planning and marking workload
- Your health being an active part of your mentoring conversations

My other advice would be a recommendation that you try to ask about any lingering covid measures in school. You want to be within a small number of classrooms that are roughly in the same part of the school, not roaming the site all day due to covid measures still in place. *Hopefully* that way of operating a school will soon be behind us but be mindful (and worth mentioning this as a concern at some point) if you think a school might be that this is additional burden on your energy levels too.

Happy to answer questions about my own experience and I hope this helps,

MR
The point about Covid is really valid.

I would also add that if OP is in any way immunocompromised, there are areas of the country where I, personally, would not want to be in a school right now. We can't fully know the situation in September, but we do know that Covid is transmitted in schools, and the DfE does not prioritise protecting teachers. I don't want to turn this thread into a debate about Covid, but personally, I think it is worth taking into account.

I would also add that I don't think a uni can guarantee what support a mentor will give, or that a mentor will discuss and be supportive of OP's health. There is a limit on what unis can impose on mentors, and what mentors can ask other class teachers a trainee works with to do. That's not to say some mentors aren't lovely and supportive, because they are, but the uni cannot guarantee this. Schools Direct *might* be a better option if OP can find a school willing to be really supportive of them.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Y13's - If you haven't confirmed your firm and insurance choices yet, why is that?

I am waiting until the deadline in case anything in my life changes (24)
18.46%
I am waiting until the deadline in case something else changes (e.g. exams/pandemic related concerns) (15)
11.54%
I am waiting until I can see the unis in person (10)
7.69%
I still have more questions before I make my decision (22)
16.92%
No reason, just haven't entered it yet (33)
25.38%
Something else (let us know in the thread!) (26)
20%

Watched Threads

View All