How to find motivation at uni?

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Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
I am a first year student at Oxbridge and I am not enjoying my course. I do not have the option to drop out or change Course, so I have to finish it.

I never found difficult to study a lot if I got the right incentive, such as when I was revising 14 h a day for A-Levels last Jan/Feb/March.

However, I now often find myself procrastinating, such as right now, and feel down as a result of my lack of motivation. I had the the intention to become a solicitor but I now found out that I do not enjoy the job. As a result, I really do not have a clear objective on what to do after uni.

How can I get back on track to study more?

Thanks in advance for any replies

Repost after mistake in wording of the title.
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Liverpool Hope University
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Anonymous)
I am a first year student at Oxbridge and I am not enjoying my course. I do not have the option to drop out or change Course, so I have to finish it.

I never found difficult to study a lot if I got the right incentive, such as when I was revising 14 h a day for A-Levels last Jan/Feb/March.

However, I now often find myself procrastinating, such as right now, and feel down as a result of my lack of motivation. I had the the intention to become a solicitor but I now found out that I do not enjoy the job. As a result, I really do not have a clear objective on what to do after uni.

How can I get back on track to study more?

Thanks in advance for any replies

Repost after mistake in wording of the title.
Hi

I am sorry to hear you're finding it difficult to settle into your university studies.

I found it useful to develop a structure when it came to my studies. A great saying to remember is 'Study SMART Not Long'. It's much easier to implement a regular and successful study schedule if you are studying SMART.

SMART stands for:

o Set yourself goals.
o Make study techniques that promote greater results.
o Ask for help.
o Reward yourself for progress.
o Take a Break.

S: Set yourself goals for study. For example, make up an exam/essay question and work towards answering it.
M: Remember VARK. Are you a Visual learner, Audio learner, Reading learner or Kinetic learner. Use study techniques that will promote the best learning for yourself.
A: If you are struggling with anything ask your teacher for help. Their job is to help you with your studies. Alternatively, use study guides or the internet to help breakdown tough subjects.
R: When you hit your goals, complete work and meet important deadlines reward yourself with treats. For example, make watching an episode of your favourite show your reward for completing tasks.
T: When you’ve finished studying take breaks. Go for a walk, hang with friends or get a cup of tea and watch TV. It’s important not to overdo revising.


Once you figure out the best routine for you, you may start to find that your procrastinate less, because it feels a lot more manageable.

I hope this helps! If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

Melissa
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Mesopotamian.
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#3
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If you don’t want to drop out or change courses, then think about the versatility of your degree. I’m assuming you’re doing law or similar, in which case you don’t have to become a solicitor. As long as you take the initiative to look for opportunities, apply for internships, look for work experience and network (even if they’re online webinars etc), you will have a solid degree as well as experience down on your CV which help you become more employable in a wide variety of sectors. Hopefully this is a good motivator.
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Anonymous #1
#4
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(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
If you don’t want to drop out or change courses, then think about the versatility of your degree. I’m assuming you’re doing law or similar, in which case you don’t have to become a solicitor. As long as you take the initiative to look for opportunities, apply for internships, look for work experience and network (even if they’re online webinars etc), you will have a solid degree as well as experience down on your CV which help you become more employable in a wide variety of sectors. Hopefully this is a good motivator.
Thanks.
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Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by Liverpool Hope University)
Hi

I am sorry to hear you're finding it difficult to settle into your university studies.

I found it useful to develop a structure when it came to my studies. A great saying to remember is 'Study SMART Not Long'. It's much easier to implement a regular and successful study schedule if you are studying SMART.

SMART stands for:

o Set yourself goals.
o Make study techniques that promote greater results.
o Ask for help.
o Reward yourself for progress.
o Take a Break.

S: Set yourself goals for study. For example, make up an exam/essay question and work towards answering it.
M: Remember VARK. Are you a Visual learner, Audio learner, Reading learner or Kinetic learner. Use study techniques that will promote the best learning for yourself.
A: If you are struggling with anything ask your teacher for help. Their job is to help you with your studies. Alternatively, use study guides or the internet to help breakdown tough subjects.
R: When you hit your goals, complete work and meet important deadlines reward yourself with treats. For example, make watching an episode of your favourite show your reward for completing tasks.
T: When you’ve finished studying take breaks. Go for a walk, hang with friends or get a cup of tea and watch TV. It’s important not to overdo revising.


Once you figure out the best routine for you, you may start to find that your procrastinate less, because it feels a lot more manageable.

I hope this helps! If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

Melissa
that's helpful, thanks for the reply.
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Liverpool Hope University
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#6
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(Original post by Anonymous)
that's helpful, thanks for the reply.
No problem! If you have any questions just ask!
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UniofReading
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#7
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I am a first year student at Oxbridge and I am not enjoying my course. I do not have the option to drop out or change Course, so I have to finish it.

I never found difficult to study a lot if I got the right incentive, such as when I was revising 14 h a day for A-Levels last Jan/Feb/March.

However, I now often find myself procrastinating, such as right now, and feel down as a result of my lack of motivation. I had the the intention to become a solicitor but I now found out that I do not enjoy the job. As a result, I really do not have a clear objective on what to do after uni.

How can I get back on track to study more?

Thanks in advance for any replies

Repost after mistake in wording of the title.
Hey Anonymous,

I'm sorry to hear that you're struggling with adjusting to university. I personally think perhaps because you found that you don't enjoy the job you thought you would it can be deflating and it can feel like there's no purpose. However, saying that having a degree of a good standard will really help you stand out from others when applying to graduate schemes etc. I think to try and bear this in mind when studying and it can help you understand the purpose and why you are studying so hard. In addition to this, try and not worry about the number of hrs you spend studying but rather how much work you get done. I find this very helpful as sometimes I can over/underestimate how long a task will take me to do. I would recommend writing a to-do list every day and perhaps ranking them in order of priority to make sure you get done what you need to get done

Hope this helps and please do let us know if you have any other questions!
From,

Amina 😊
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