TSR32332
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I am currently studying a non-science degree and I am looking to work in finance for the next 10-15 years, in after this I would like to work in biological research such as vaccine discovery/enzyme research, what can I do whilst working to be able to do this? I have A levels in Biology and Chemistry
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0le
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It may be difficult to make this sort of transition. Not impossible, but difficult.

This is because many graduate or entry roles in life sciences (or related fields) require some sort of degree, which means to access these particular jobs, you may have to study part-time for a degree. Examples of these particular roles include research and many lab assistant roles. Maybe there are equivalent qualifications as well that you can work towards and someone here with more knowledge can help in that regard.

However, one major positive is that you will have extensive real world experience of working with numbers and I guess some statistics as well, so working in an area of say bioinformatics may be accessible to you more easily than something lab based.

In the mean time, you can always read some undergraduate texts to start learning in your own time as well. Maybe you could develop a good knowledge and then consider doing a MSc, provided you manage to gain all the prerequisite knowledge?
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TSR32332
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(Original post by 0le)
It may be difficult to make this sort of transition. Not impossible, but difficult.

This is because many graduate or entry roles in life sciences (or related fields) require some sort of degree, which means to access these particular jobs, you may have to study part-time for a degree. Examples of these particular roles include research and many lab assistant roles. Maybe there are equivalent qualifications as well that you can work towards and someone here with more knowledge can help in that regard.

However, one major positive is that you will have extensive real world experience of working with numbers and I guess some statistics as well, so working in an area of say bioinformatics may be accessible to you more easily than something lab based.

In the mean time, you can always read some undergraduate texts to start learning in your own time as well. Maybe you could develop a good knowledge and then consider doing a MSc, provided you manage to gain all the prerequisite knowledge?
Do you think they would allow me to enter directly onto a masters. If I completed some modules at OU and showed good knowledge backed up by my A level Biology grade?
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0le
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(Original post by TSR32332)
Do you think they would allow me to enter directly onto a masters. If I completed some modules at OU and showed good knowledge backed up by my A level Biology grade?
You would have to check the course requirements.
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