Shafxx
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I’m currently studying A levels and I feel as though flashcards really help me abut my biggest problem is that I can’t make them properly. I always write all the information on them, and it’s just getting to the point where I’m spending hours rewriting all of my notes onto flashcards. It takes ages to write them for Psychology,Biology, and Chemistry-where I'm just writing the information down not actually learning anything. Does anyone know how to effectively write them, so you can revise and learn content at the same time because I just feel like I'm wasting time
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Knav
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(Original post by Shafxx)
I’m currently studying A levels and I feel as though flashcards really help me abut my biggest problem is that I can’t make them properly. I always write all the information on them, and it’s just getting to the point where I’m spending hours rewriting all of my notes onto flashcards. It takes ages to write them for Psychology,Biology, and Chemistry-where I'm just writing the information down not actually learning anything. Does anyone know how to effectively write them, so you can revise and learn content at the same time because I just feel like I'm wasting time
Please don’t waste your time haha. Making flash cards by hands is time consuming and frankly in my opinion, not worth it.
Especially when you have Quizlet. I did all my studies via Quizlet, and you can make your own cards online too! You can delete irrelevant info which will save LOADS of time.
Active recall is where you learn, the time you spend making notes you could have active recalled all of the Biology syllabus lol.

Good luck!
Last edited by Knav; 3 months ago
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Qxi.xli
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(Original post by Knav)
Please don’t waste your time haha. Making flash cards by hands is time consuming and frankly in my opinion, not worth it.
Especially when you have Quizlet. I did all my studies via Quizlet, and you can make your own cards online too! No annoying mistakes and save LOADS of time.

Good luck!
but even typing them all up on quizlet takes like an hour for one topic


OP i literally hv the same problem as u ):
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Knav
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
but even typing them all up on quizlet takes like an hour for one topic


OP i literally hv the same problem as u ):
I say “make your flash cards” lightly but what I really want to say is don’t 🤣
The resources on Quizlet are AMPLE. There are more than enough to cover all the notes on your syllabus.
Contrary to the popular believe, making notes/copying information out is the biggest waste of time when it comes to studying, so don’t.

Ill make a list of how I study If you’d like? We can always help one another out )
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Qxi.xli
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(Original post by Knav)
I say “make your flash cards” lightly but what I really want to say is don’t 🤣
The resources on Quizlet are AMPLE. There are more than enough to cover all the notes on your syllabus.
Contrary to the popular believe, making notes/copying information out is the biggest waste of time when it comes to studying, so don’t.

Ill make a list of how I study If you’d like? We can always help one another out )
ahh ok thanks

yes pls that would be great
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Shafxx
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
but even typing them all up on quizlet takes like an hour for one topic


OP i literally hv the same problem as u ):
I've literally done next to nothing in terms of making things I can revise from later and it's really annoying me because idek where to start either
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Knav
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
ahh ok thanks

yes pls that would be great
I’m doing Bio, Chem, Geo and English Lit

What you need to do is get folders for EVERY subject. Yes lol, get folders. Organise all your materials chronologically in your exam board syllabus. For example, the heart>DNA>cells>ecosystem.
This will help your brain recognise content within a topic so you can tailor the questions and answers exactly to the mark schemes.

Quizlet, SnapRevise, calculation questions and past papers are all the resources you need for Bio and Chem.
You can even create word documents, copy and paste info from quizlet in it and print them out by topics

Biology:
Simple enough, watch SnapRevise videos, they’re free on YouTube. Quizlet is pretty much everything you need content wise to pass the exams. Just do them in topics.

Psychology: I don’t do this subject but I would probably go about it the same way as bio because they’re memorisation games.

Chemistry:
Trickier, but doable. Watch Mr Elliot Rintoul on YouTube, free as well, he’s amazing and it will help you more than any lessons in school. Quizlet sadly won’t be enough here, but helpful with definitions eg atomic structure and principles. you need to do practice questions religiously. Luckily there’s only so many formats the exam board can give. If you’re fluent in mole calculation, constant gas equation, titration, drawing mechanism you’re ok for AS. In A2 it’s more complicated but no more than GCSE higher maths. The key is PRACTICE. I’ll talk you through this in a bit.

TECHNIQUES:
Perhaps I owe my grades to the most effective revision technique of all : ACTIVE RECALL.
Don’t just read or make notes, it won’t work. Every time after you read a concept/ideas/data in Bio or Geo especially, you need to put the book away, cover the Quizlet and try to recite it back in your head. Do it until you get it right and it will stay there for a long time. I promise you it works wonder, takes more efforts but you need to do this, most A* candidates use this technique.

PAST PAPERS:
I cannot stress how important these are. Available online everywhere, type your exam board and the topics then print them out and try to do them. They are your saving grace, they will be the ones to really make your grades improve. So now you have the content, great. But you don’t know how to structure the answer to get full marks. That’s why mark schemes are so important. MEMORISE the answers in mark schemes because they are interchangeable for questions of the same topics. Before my Bio mock I did 6 past paper from 2012-2018 and I got 78/90. I revised 2 days before the exam. Now you see lots of students don’t utilise past papers instead focusing on making long pretty notes, that’s their downfall. There’s no point in knowing longer sentences when snappy short sentences will get you those marks.

DIAGRAMS:
Goes without saying, draw out processes in bio and geography with step1>step2>step3. Simplify the steps, don’t be writhing full sentences with “then, because, therefore”. Just the keywords to get you those marks > see mark schemes. For processes like mitosis, atherosclerosis, transcription translation etc diagrams are the most effective ways. Then learn them using ACTIVE RECALL.
For chemistry, watch the videos, past paper and continuous calculation practice will get you top grade. Use active recall for wordy stuff like La Chatelier’s principle, Hess’s Law and Equations.

TIMING: One topic a day is good but I really don’t recommend jumping 1 hour of Bio to 1 hour of Chem to 1 hour of Geo. Unless you have both exams on the same day, focus on ONLY 1 SUBJECT IN A DAY. Why? Because your brain is on the zone of that subject. If you’re doing Cell structure, your brain is gonna be much happier progressing on to viruses, bacteria and the immune system than let’s say Organic Chem. It’s all about efficiency and how much you can learn in a set amount of time.

REVISION STYLE: I personally love the Poromodo technique. Make notes/ active recall/ watch video, whatever you do, in the span of 25-30 mins max. Then have 5 minutes break. Repeat this 4 times. That comes to about 2 hours. Then have a long 20-30 mins break.
This is to keep your attention span at their peak, no human can grind without rest, and our attention span dwindles after 30 mins. You want to make sure your brain is in top form when active recalling and absorbing info.

Make sure you are not shying away from asking your teachers in lessons when you don’t understand something immediately, it’s much better to dissect the problem with an expert then by yourself I promise!

Good luck! 😊🤞🏼
Last edited by Knav; 3 months ago
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Qxi.xli
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(Original post by Knav)
I’m doing Bio, Chem, Geo and English Lit

What you need to do is get folders for EVERY subject. Yes lol, get folders. Organise all your materials chronologically in your exam board syllabus. For example, the heart>DNA>cells>ecosystem.
This will help your brain recognise content within a topic so you can tailor the questions and answers exactly to the mark schemes.

Quizlet, SnapRevise, calculation questions and past papers are all the resources you need for Bio and Chem.
You can even create word documents, copy and paste info from quizlet in it and print them out by topics

Biology:
Simple enough, watch SnapRevise videos, they’re free on YouTube. Quizlet is pretty much everything you need content wise to pass the exams. Just do them in topics.

Psychology: I don’t do this subject but I would probably go about it the same way as bio because they’re memorisation games.

Chemistry:
Trickier, but doable. Watch Mr Elliot Rintoul on YouTube, free as well, he’s amazing and it will help you more than any lessons in school. Quizlet sadly won’t be enough here, but helpful with definitions eg atomic structure and principles. you need to do practice questions religiously. Luckily there’s only so many formats the exam board can give. If you’re fluent in mole calculation, constant gas equation, titration, drawing mechanism you’re ok for AS. In A2 it’s more complicated but no more than GCSE higher maths. The key is PRACTICE. I’ll talk you through this in a bit.

TECHNIQUES:
Perhaps I owe my grades to the most effective revision technique of all : ACTIVE RECALL.
Don’t just read or make notes, it won’t work. Every time after you read a concept/ideas/data in Bio or Geo especially, you need to put the book away, cover the Quizlet and try to recite it back in your head. Do it until you get it right and it will stay there for a long time. I promise you it works wonder, takes more efforts but you need to do this, most A* candidates use this technique.

PAST PAPERS:
I cannot stress how important these are. Available online everywhere, type your exam board and the topics then print them out and try to do them. They are your saving grace, they will be the ones to really make your grades improve. So now you have the content, great. But you don’t know how to structure the answer to get full marks. That’s why mark schemes are so important. MEMORISE the answers in mark schemes because they are interchangeable for questions of the same topics. Before my Bio mock I did 6 past paper from 2012-2018 and I got 78/90. I revised 2 days before the exam. Now you see lots of students don’t utilise past papers instead focusing on making long pretty notes, that’s their downfall. There’s no point in knowing longer sentences when snappy short sentences will get you those marks.

DIAGRAMS:
Goes without saying, draw out processes in bio and geography with step1>step2>step3. Simplify the steps, don’t be writhing full sentences with “then, because, therefore”. Just the keywords to get you those marks > see mark schemes. For processes like mitosis, atherosclerosis, transcription translation etc diagrams are the most effective ways. Then learn them using ACTIVE RECALL.
For chemistry, watch the videos, past paper and continuous calculation practice will get you top grade. Use active recall for wordy stuff like La Chatelier’s principle, Hess’s Law and Equations.

TIMING: One topic a day is good but I really don’t recommend jumping 1 hour of Bio to 1 hour of Chem to 1 hour of Geo. Unless you have both exams on the same day, focus on ONLY 1 SUBJECT IN A DAY. Why? Because your brain is on the zone of that subject. If you’re doing Cell structure, your brain is gonna be much happier progressing on to viruses, bacteria and the immune system than let’s say Organic Chem. It’s all about efficiency and how much you can learn in a set amount of time.

REVISION STYLE: I personally love the Poromodo technique. Make notes/ active recall/ watch video, whatever you do, in the span of 25-30 mins max. Then have 5 minutes break. Repeat this 4 times. That comes to about 2 hours. Then have a long 20-30 mins break.
This is to keep your attention span at their peak, no human can grind without rest, and our attention span dwindles after 30 mins. You want to make sure your brain is in top form when active recalling and absorbing info.

Make sure you are not shying away from asking your teachers in lessons when you don’t understand something immediately, it’s much better to dissect the problem with an expert then by yourself I promise!

Good luck! 😊🤞🏼
PRSOM

thanks sooo much

hv a good rest of ur day x
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mr8
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What does it mean when you have a score of top third of students? Is this good or bad
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Knav
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(Original post by mr8)
What does it mean when you have a score of top third of students? Is this good or bad
Top third means you’re above average. Very good
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samirxarif
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(Original post by Knav)
I’m doing Bio, Chem, Geo and English Lit

What you need to do is get folders for EVERY subject. Yes lol, get folders. Organise all your materials chronologically in your exam board syllabus. For example, the heart>DNA>cells>ecosystem.
This will help your brain recognise content within a topic so you can tailor the questions and answers exactly to the mark schemes.

Quizlet, SnapRevise, calculation questions and past papers are all the resources you need for Bio and Chem.
You can even create word documents, copy and paste info from quizlet in it and print them out by topics

Biology:
Simple enough, watch SnapRevise videos, they’re free on YouTube. Quizlet is pretty much everything you need content wise to pass the exams. Just do them in topics.

Psychology: I don’t do this subject but I would probably go about it the same way as bio because they’re memorisation games.

Chemistry:
Trickier, but doable. Watch Mr Elliot Rintoul on YouTube, free as well, he’s amazing and it will help you more than any lessons in school. Quizlet sadly won’t be enough here, but helpful with definitions eg atomic structure and principles. you need to do practice questions religiously. Luckily there’s only so many formats the exam board can give. If you’re fluent in mole calculation, constant gas equation, titration, drawing mechanism you’re ok for AS. In A2 it’s more complicated but no more than GCSE higher maths. The key is PRACTICE. I’ll talk you through this in a bit.

TECHNIQUES:
Perhaps I owe my grades to the most effective revision technique of all : ACTIVE RECALL.
Don’t just read or make notes, it won’t work. Every time after you read a concept/ideas/data in Bio or Geo especially, you need to put the book away, cover the Quizlet and try to recite it back in your head. Do it until you get it right and it will stay there for a long time. I promise you it works wonder, takes more efforts but you need to do this, most A* candidates use this technique.

PAST PAPERS:
I cannot stress how important these are. Available online everywhere, type your exam board and the topics then print them out and try to do them. They are your saving grace, they will be the ones to really make your grades improve. So now you have the content, great. But you don’t know how to structure the answer to get full marks. That’s why mark schemes are so important. MEMORISE the answers in mark schemes because they are interchangeable for questions of the same topics. Before my Bio mock I did 6 past paper from 2012-2018 and I got 78/90. I revised 2 days before the exam. Now you see lots of students don’t utilise past papers instead focusing on making long pretty notes, that’s their downfall. There’s no point in knowing longer sentences when snappy short sentences will get you those marks.

DIAGRAMS:
Goes without saying, draw out processes in bio and geography with step1>step2>step3. Simplify the steps, don’t be writhing full sentences with “then, because, therefore”. Just the keywords to get you those marks > see mark schemes. For processes like mitosis, atherosclerosis, transcription translation etc diagrams are the most effective ways. Then learn them using ACTIVE RECALL.
For chemistry, watch the videos, past paper and continuous calculation practice will get you top grade. Use active recall for wordy stuff like La Chatelier’s principle, Hess’s Law and Equations.

TIMING: One topic a day is good but I really don’t recommend jumping 1 hour of Bio to 1 hour of Chem to 1 hour of Geo. Unless you have both exams on the same day, focus on ONLY 1 SUBJECT IN A DAY. Why? Because your brain is on the zone of that subject. If you’re doing Cell structure, your brain is gonna be much happier progressing on to viruses, bacteria and the immune system than let’s say Organic Chem. It’s all about efficiency and how much you can learn in a set amount of time.

REVISION STYLE: I personally love the Poromodo technique. Make notes/ active recall/ watch video, whatever you do, in the span of 25-30 mins max. Then have 5 minutes break. Repeat this 4 times. That comes to about 2 hours. Then have a long 20-30 mins break.
This is to keep your attention span at their peak, no human can grind without rest, and our attention span dwindles after 30 mins. You want to make sure your brain is in top form when active recalling and absorbing info.

Make sure you are not shying away from asking your teachers in lessons when you don’t understand something immediately, it’s much better to dissect the problem with an expert then by yourself I promise!

Good luck! 😊🤞🏼
This was really helpful, thank you very much!
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Shafxx
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#12
(Original post by Knav)
I’m doing Bio, Chem, Geo and English Lit

What you need to do is get folders for EVERY subject. Yes lol, get folders. Organise all your materials chronologically in your exam board syllabus. For example, the heart>DNA>cells>ecosystem.
This will help your brain recognise content within a topic so you can tailor the questions and answers exactly to the mark schemes.

Quizlet, SnapRevise, calculation questions and past papers are all the resources you need for Bio and Chem.
You can even create word documents, copy and paste info from quizlet in it and print them out by topics

Biology:
Simple enough, watch SnapRevise videos, they’re free on YouTube. Quizlet is pretty much everything you need content wise to pass the exams. Just do them in topics.

Psychology: I don’t do this subject but I would probably go about it the same way as bio because they’re memorisation games.

Chemistry:
Trickier, but doable. Watch Mr Elliot Rintoul on YouTube, free as well, he’s amazing and it will help you more than any lessons in school. Quizlet sadly won’t be enough here, but helpful with definitions eg atomic structure and principles. you need to do practice questions religiously. Luckily there’s only so many formats the exam board can give. If you’re fluent in mole calculation, constant gas equation, titration, drawing mechanism you’re ok for AS. In A2 it’s more complicated but no more than GCSE higher maths. The key is PRACTICE. I’ll talk you through this in a bit.

TECHNIQUES:
Perhaps I owe my grades to the most effective revision technique of all : ACTIVE RECALL.
Don’t just read or make notes, it won’t work. Every time after you read a concept/ideas/data in Bio or Geo especially, you need to put the book away, cover the Quizlet and try to recite it back in your head. Do it until you get it right and it will stay there for a long time. I promise you it works wonder, takes more efforts but you need to do this, most A* candidates use this technique.

PAST PAPERS:
I cannot stress how important these are. Available online everywhere, type your exam board and the topics then print them out and try to do them. They are your saving grace, they will be the ones to really make your grades improve. So now you have the content, great. But you don’t know how to structure the answer to get full marks. That’s why mark schemes are so important. MEMORISE the answers in mark schemes because they are interchangeable for questions of the same topics. Before my Bio mock I did 6 past paper from 2012-2018 and I got 78/90. I revised 2 days before the exam. Now you see lots of students don’t utilise past papers instead focusing on making long pretty notes, that’s their downfall. There’s no point in knowing longer sentences when snappy short sentences will get you those marks.

DIAGRAMS:
Goes without saying, draw out processes in bio and geography with step1>step2>step3. Simplify the steps, don’t be writhing full sentences with “then, because, therefore”. Just the keywords to get you those marks > see mark schemes. For processes like mitosis, atherosclerosis, transcription translation etc diagrams are the most effective ways. Then learn them using ACTIVE RECALL.
For chemistry, watch the videos, past paper and continuous calculation practice will get you top grade. Use active recall for wordy stuff like La Chatelier’s principle, Hess’s Law and Equations.

TIMING: One topic a day is good but I really don’t recommend jumping 1 hour of Bio to 1 hour of Chem to 1 hour of Geo. Unless you have both exams on the same day, focus on ONLY 1 SUBJECT IN A DAY. Why? Because your brain is on the zone of that subject. If you’re doing Cell structure, your brain is gonna be much happier progressing on to viruses, bacteria and the immune system than let’s say Organic Chem. It’s all about efficiency and how much you can learn in a set amount of time.

REVISION STYLE: I personally love the Poromodo technique. Make notes/ active recall/ watch video, whatever you do, in the span of 25-30 mins max. Then have 5 minutes break. Repeat this 4 times. That comes to about 2 hours. Then have a long 20-30 mins break.
This is to keep your attention span at their peak, no human can grind without rest, and our attention span dwindles after 30 mins. You want to make sure your brain is in top form when active recalling and absorbing info.

Make sure you are not shying away from asking your teachers in lessons when you don’t understand something immediately, it’s much better to dissect the problem with an expert then by yourself I promise!

Good luck! 😊🤞🏼
I've literally just seen this now thank you! In terms of organizing your folders for bio and chem do you make mindmaps etc. because I want to keep them organized but not so much that I'm unnecessarily wasting time
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Knav
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(Original post by Shafxx)
I've literally just seen this now thank you! In terms of organizing your folders for bio and chem do you make mindmaps etc. because I want to keep them organized but not so much that I'm unnecessarily wasting time
Literally I go on my exam board syllabus, look through the topics, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 etc and sort my paper/resources in those topics and put them in chronological order. It’s really easy and quick, seemed daunting at first for me but only took more than an hour for all 4 subjects haha and it’s there for life, any new materials can be added towards the end of the folder or slot them into the topics 😁
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eviecc
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(Original post by Knav)
I’m doing Bio, Chem, Geo and English Lit

What you need to do is get folders for EVERY subject. Yes lol, get folders. Organise all your materials chronologically in your exam board syllabus. For example, the heart>DNA>cells>ecosystem.
This will help your brain recognise content within a topic so you can tailor the questions and answers exactly to the mark schemes.

Quizlet, SnapRevise, calculation questions and past papers are all the resources you need for Bio and Chem.
You can even create word documents, copy and paste info from quizlet in it and print them out by topics

Biology:
Simple enough, watch SnapRevise videos, they’re free on YouTube. Quizlet is pretty much everything you need content wise to pass the exams. Just do them in topics.

Psychology: I don’t do this subject but I would probably go about it the same way as bio because they’re memorisation games.

Chemistry:
Trickier, but doable. Watch Mr Elliot Rintoul on YouTube, free as well, he’s amazing and it will help you more than any lessons in school. Quizlet sadly won’t be enough here, but helpful with definitions eg atomic structure and principles. you need to do practice questions religiously. Luckily there’s only so many formats the exam board can give. If you’re fluent in mole calculation, constant gas equation, titration, drawing mechanism you’re ok for AS. In A2 it’s more complicated but no more than GCSE higher maths. The key is PRACTICE. I’ll talk you through this in a bit.

TECHNIQUES:
Perhaps I owe my grades to the most effective revision technique of all : ACTIVE RECALL.
Don’t just read or make notes, it won’t work. Every time after you read a concept/ideas/data in Bio or Geo especially, you need to put the book away, cover the Quizlet and try to recite it back in your head. Do it until you get it right and it will stay there for a long time. I promise you it works wonder, takes more efforts but you need to do this, most A* candidates use this technique.

PAST PAPERS:
I cannot stress how important these are. Available online everywhere, type your exam board and the topics then print them out and try to do them. They are your saving grace, they will be the ones to really make your grades improve. So now you have the content, great. But you don’t know how to structure the answer to get full marks. That’s why mark schemes are so important. MEMORISE the answers in mark schemes because they are interchangeable for questions of the same topics. Before my Bio mock I did 6 past paper from 2012-2018 and I got 78/90. I revised 2 days before the exam. Now you see lots of students don’t utilise past papers instead focusing on making long pretty notes, that’s their downfall. There’s no point in knowing longer sentences when snappy short sentences will get you those marks.

DIAGRAMS:
Goes without saying, draw out processes in bio and geography with step1>step2>step3. Simplify the steps, don’t be writhing full sentences with “then, because, therefore”. Just the keywords to get you those marks > see mark schemes. For processes like mitosis, atherosclerosis, transcription translation etc diagrams are the most effective ways. Then learn them using ACTIVE RECALL.
For chemistry, watch the videos, past paper and continuous calculation practice will get you top grade. Use active recall for wordy stuff like La Chatelier’s principle, Hess’s Law and Equations.

TIMING: One topic a day is good but I really don’t recommend jumping 1 hour of Bio to 1 hour of Chem to 1 hour of Geo. Unless you have both exams on the same day, focus on ONLY 1 SUBJECT IN A DAY. Why? Because your brain is on the zone of that subject. If you’re doing Cell structure, your brain is gonna be much happier progressing on to viruses, bacteria and the immune system than let’s say Organic Chem. It’s all about efficiency and how much you can learn in a set amount of time.

REVISION STYLE: I personally love the Poromodo technique. Make notes/ active recall/ watch video, whatever you do, in the span of 25-30 mins max. Then have 5 minutes break. Repeat this 4 times. That comes to about 2 hours. Then have a long 20-30 mins break.
This is to keep your attention span at their peak, no human can grind without rest, and our attention span dwindles after 30 mins. You want to make sure your brain is in top form when active recalling and absorbing info.

Make sure you are not shying away from asking your teachers in lessons when you don’t understand something immediately, it’s much better to dissect the problem with an expert then by yourself I promise!

Good luck! 😊🤞🏼
This is super informative and helpful, thank you!! What board is your English Lit? And do you use quizlet too to help study for it?
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