A career in nursing Q&A: Ask me anything about being an NHS nurse

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LDstudentbuzz
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Nurses are central to delivering world class healthcare in the NHS. A nurse's work includes medical procedures, clinical research and education, and planning treatment for patients. They touch lives at times of basic human need, when care and compassion are what matter the most.

And there’s never been a better time to become a nurse; 94% of graduates get a job within six months of finishing their course and all nursing students receive annual payments of at least £5,000 to £8,000 to help fund their studies.

If you have a question about what a career in nursing is like, ask here and NHS nurses will answer.

And you can sign up for free expert advice on starting a career in nursing here.
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LDstudentbuzz
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(Original post by LDstudentbuzz)
Nurses are central to delivering world class healthcare in the NHS. A nurse's work includes medical procedures, clinical research and education, and planning treatment for patients. They touch lives at times of basic human need, when care and compassion are what matter the most.

And there’s never been a better time to become a nurse; 94% of graduates get a job within six months of finishing their course and all nursing students receive annual payments of at least £5,000 to £8,000 to help fund their studies.

If you have a question about what a career in nursing is like, ask here and NHS nurses will answer.

And you can sign up for free expert advice on starting a career in nursing here.
Hi Sian & Anna here.
We qualified as learning disability nurses in 2018. From qualifying Sian has worked in a locked rehab with men who have learning disabilities and/or mental health conditions. She is due to start a new job in December at a low secure forensic unit for men with learning disabilities and/or mental health conditons.

Once qualified Anna worked as a community childrens nurse with children who have life limiting/threatning conditions within their homes, schools and respite units. After a year Anna got a new job as a staff nurse at a challenging behaviour day service for adults with learning disabilities.

Out of the four fields of nursing, learning disability nursing seems to one of mystery. The role and existence of learning disability nurses is still questioned frequently and our specialist skills are often overlooked. We hope we can help shed light onto what learning disability nursing is and what we do.
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Connor Vout
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My name is Connor Vout and I am a Team Leader for Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust working on one of our forensic mental health wards in Prestwich. Men and women may enter our service when there are concerns about their mental health needs and levels of risk to others. Our aim is to care for service users in the least restrictive environment, provide a high level of therapeutic care to reduce their length of stay and to support service users to recover and be discharged back into their local community with support for our Forensic Assessment and Support Team.
I achieved my nursing degree from the University of Salford in 2016. My first role as a mental health nurse was on Buttermere ward, a medium secure, acute mental health, inpatient ward for female patients. On Buttermere ward I was able to work as part of a Multi-Disciplinary Team to complete care plans for patients with complex needs and challenging behaviours.

After working on Buttermere ward I moved to Hayeswater ward, which is a therapeutically enhanced medium secure, mental health, inpatient ward for patients with challenging behaviours and requiring a longer stay in hospital. After around two years with the female service, I moved to Eskdale ward, which is a male acute mental health, inpatient ward. After building on my nursing skills and adapting to working with male medium secure patients, I applied for the Band 6 Team Leader role. I got the job and then worked on a pre-discharge, inpatient ward working with male, mental health patients about to leave the service to go into supported accommodation. After working on the pre-discharge ward I returned to the male acute, mental health service on Rydal ward, which is where I currently work.

Any questions regarding Mental health Nursing and what its like being an RMN please reply
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tinygirl96
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why no physical disability nursing?
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LDstudentbuzz
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Physical disabilities are covered within the 4 fields of nursing.
Would you like to study nursing?
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Other_Owl
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Whats it like to work over Christmas, Boxing day, new years etc?
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LDstudentbuzz
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(Original post by Other_Owl)
Whats it like to work over Christmas, Boxing day, new years etc?
Hi Other_owl,
I personally really enjoy working during the Christmas period. It's great to help others get into the festive spirit especially when some patients don't have family that can visit. We usually work short shifts too so still time in the day to spend time with your family too.
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Sim1126
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(Original post by LDstudentbuzz)
Nurses are central to delivering world class healthcare in the NHS. A nurse's work includes medical procedures, clinical research and education, and planning treatment for patients. They touch lives at times of basic human need, when care and compassion are what matter the most.

And there’s never been a better time to become a nurse; 94% of graduates get a job within six months of finishing their course and all nursing students receive annual payments of at least £5,000 to £8,000 to help fund their studies.

If you have a question about what a career in nursing is like, ask here and NHS nurses will answer.

And you can sign up for free expert advice on starting a career in nursing here.
Hi, I’m applying for adult nursing and I was wondering if I can become a district nurse right after. I don’t seem to find many people working as a district nursing and I don’t know why, is it not a nice path to go towards?
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tinygirl96
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(Original post by LDstudentbuzz)
Physical disabilities are covered within the 4 fields of nursing.
Would you like to study nursing?
nah just curious
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moonkatt
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(Original post by Sim1126)
Hi, I’m applying for adult nursing and I was wondering if I can become a district nurse right after. I don’t seem to find many people working as a district nursing and I don’t know why, is it not a nice path to go towards?
Community and district nursing is a pretty big area of practice and it’s an area of nursing you’ll certainly have placements in as a student. Newly qualified nurses can and do go to work in the community on graduation.
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Sim1126
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(Original post by moonkatt)
Community and district nursing is a pretty big area of practice and it’s an area of nursing you’ll certainly have placements in as a student. Newly qualified nurses can and do go to work in the community on graduation.
Thank you for your reply. I’m just considering what areas I like, but I’d get if I change that as in placements you get lots of insight I guess. Thank you.
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moonkatt
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(Original post by Sim1126)
Thank you for your reply. I’m just considering what areas I like, but I’d get if I change that as in placements you get lots of insight I guess. Thank you.
You’re welcome

It most likely will change as you experience different environments. It’s always worthwhile to research areas that interest you though.
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Connor Vout
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(Original post by Other_Owl)
Whats it like to work over Christmas, Boxing day, new years etc?
hi Other_owl
Personally I've enjoyed working over the Christmas and new year period. The wards generally try to make the period festive and fun with activities. Working in mental health this period is important to give patients extra support specially with not being able to see family members at this current time. We also usually work short shifts too so still have time in the day to spend time with your family too.
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Connor Vout
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(Original post by LDstudentbuzz)
Nurses are central to delivering world class healthcare in the NHS. A nurse's work includes medical procedures, clinical research and education, and planning treatment for patients. They touch lives at times of basic human need, when care and compassion are what matter the most.

And there’s never been a better time to become a nurse; 94% of graduates get a job within six months of finishing their course and all nursing students receive annual payments of at least £5,000 to £8,000 to help fund their studies.

If you have a question about what a career in nursing is like, ask here and NHS nurses will answer.

And you can sign up for free expert advice on starting a career in nursing here.
Any questions regarding mental health nursing or questions about student nurse experiences please don't hesitate ask
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Frontleft
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how did you choose which field of nursing to go into?
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glassalice
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(Original post by Connor Vout)
My name is Connor Vout and I am a Team Leader for Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust working on one of our forensic mental health wards in Prestwich. Men and women may enter our service when there are concerns about their mental health needs and levels of risk to others. Our aim is to care for service users in the least restrictive environment, provide a high level of therapeutic care to reduce their length of stay and to support service users to recover and be discharged back into their local community with support for our Forensic Assessment and Support Team.
I achieved my nursing degree from the University of Salford in 2016. My first role as a mental health nurse was on Buttermere ward, a medium secure, acute mental health, inpatient ward for female patients. On Buttermere ward I was able to work as part of a Multi-Disciplinary Team to complete care plans for patients with complex needs and challenging behaviours.

After working on Buttermere ward I moved to Hayeswater ward, which is a therapeutically enhanced medium secure, mental health, inpatient ward for patients with challenging behaviours and requiring a longer stay in hospital. After around two years with the female service, I moved to Eskdale ward, which is a male acute mental health, inpatient ward. After building on my nursing skills and adapting to working with male medium secure patients, I applied for the Band 6 Team Leader role. I got the job and then worked on a pre-discharge, inpatient ward working with male, mental health patients about to leave the service to go into supported accommodation. After working on the pre-discharge ward I returned to the male acute, mental health service on Rydal ward, which is where I currently work.

Any questions regarding Mental health Nursing and what its like being an RMN please reply
What changes are the trust making in light of Rowan Thompsons death?
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Connor Vout
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(Original post by glassalice)
What changes are the trust making in light of Rowan Thompsons death?
Thanks for your question but I am not able to comment on this. For any further information please contact [email protected]
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LDstudentbuzz
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(Original post by Frontleft)
how did you choose which field of nursing to go into?
Personally for me (Anna) I orginally wanted to do childrens nursing and went to an open day. I got talking to a learning disability nurse lecturer and also went on one of the talks and realised this was something id be very interested in. I then got some experience with adults who have LD and applied the next year
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TS_15
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How diffiicult did you find the training...?

(Original post by Connor Vout)
Any questions regarding mental health nursing or questions about student nurse experiences please don't hesitate ask
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Final Fantasy
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What additional background checks did you have to undergo to work at these mental health facilities?
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