kongDerf
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hey guys, how are you all revising for the theory exam? i know myrevisionnotes released their revision guide and i find it quite useful
just a little stuck as i chose to do product design for a level, despite not doing DT for gcse ;-; wasnt a smart move but i was accepted, i do well in tests(as i’ve tried my best to catch up, which has helped) and in the coursework, however i am put off at the theory :/ what are your best techniques?
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CoolCavy
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Sorry you havent received any replies to this :console:

One of the best methods of revision i found were to look at the every day objects around me and ask myself the following questions; what is it made of? Why is it made from this material? How has it been made? What is working well with this design? and What could be improved?

Once you start asking yourself these questions and looking up the answers for things you arent sure of you are building up that questioning mindset and broadening your knowledge of manufacturing processes

Exam practice is obviously important but what works best for you in terms of if flash cards etc are helpful will be individual to how you best learn

Good revision resources include roymech, technologystudent and globalspec

If you want some easy passive revision then watch videos like inside the factory and how its made

Dont be put off by not doing it for GCSE, the actual content at alevel is very similar in terms of things like material properties and manufacturing processes (these things dont really change from GCSE > Alevel). I would say the main difference is how you apply that knowledege. At gcse you are generally asked to recall knowledge from memory whereas at alevel you are required to think more critically and evaluate a product in terms of form function and aesthetic. You are also less likely to be told the method of manufacture and the material in the question itself - which is why going around your house asking yourself about materials etc is good practice for this
Also be aware that in some of these things there is no absolute answer, a variety of different plastic types could be appropriate for the same product. Providing you can justify why you have chosen this material or manufacture process and its not a totally random wild choice then you should be all good
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kongDerf
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Sorry you havent received any replies to this :console:

One of the best methods of revision i found were to look at the every day objects around me and ask myself the following questions; what is it made of? Why is it made from this material? How has it been made? What is working well with this design? and What could be improved?

Once you start asking yourself these questions and looking up the answers for things you arent sure of you are building up that questioning mindset and broadening your knowledge of manufacturing processes

Exam practice is obviously important but what works best for you in terms of if flash cards etc are helpful will be individual to how you best learn

Good revision resources include roymech, technologystudent and globalspec

If you want some easy passive revision then watch videos like inside the factory and how its made

Dont be put off by not doing it for GCSE, the actual content at alevel is very similar in terms of things like material properties and manufacturing processes (these things dont really change from GCSE > Alevel). I would say the main difference is how you apply that knowledege. At gcse you are generally asked to recall knowledge from memory whereas at alevel you are required to think more critically and evaluate a product in terms of form function and aesthetic. You are also less likely to be told the method of manufacture and the material in the question itself - which is why going around your house asking yourself about materials etc is good practice for this
Also be aware that in some of these things there is no absolute answer, a variety of different plastic types could be appropriate for the same product. Providing you can justify why you have chosen this material or manufacture process and its not a totally random wild choice then you should be all good
Thank you so much for this (: Not feeling too low about it now and doing the theory in my lessons now, but these words have really cheered me up - thank you again (:
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