Reenaa2020
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Hi guys, currently doing Alevels. Was wondering how’s the workload and content wise( is it like difficult to understand?) in Medicine compared to Alevels!? Like how do you keep up, and make notes(I heard that there are also many slides so how do you decide if a particular content is worth including in your notes?) Anyone here can answer this plss) Feel free to leave tips here too thankiew🤪
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ecolier
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(Original post by Reenaa2020)
Hi guys, currently doing Alevels. Was wondering how’s the workload and content wise( is it like difficult to understand?) in Medicine compared to Alevels!?
Different from med school to med school - remember that university curriculum are not standardised.

What is a core topic in first year at one med school (e.g. anatomy of the head and neck) may be learnt at second or even third year at another.

As a rule of thumb, the pre-clinical years are pretty quiet (in my personal experience and my experience now as a lecturer), and you'd usually have plenty of time to revise and study.

Where I studied, the lectures in first and second years were half day with one half day a week when we go to the hospital - so in a week it's 4 half days and one full day. Easy enough so that when I got back to the halls of residence, I got to revise for 2-3 hours per day, go to the gym for an hour and still have loads of time to socialise

Like how do you keep up, and make notes(I heard that there are also many slides so how do you decide if a particular content is worth including in your notes?) Anyone here can answer this plss) Feel free to leave tips here too thankiew🤪
That depends person-to-person. Remember that plenty of people don't go from A-Levels to medical school.

They may have done gap years, some will have moved from Medicine with a Foundation Year / Gateway Year courses, others will have done a degree (which may or may not be science-related), a few will come from Access Courses - having not done any purely academic study for years!

I personally read the lectures / books, then write down notes from what I remember and challenge myself to recall them at a later time but this will vary - my method may well not work for 90% of other students. Learning methods are very individual and one will not work for all.

Hopefully, by virtue of the fact that you're thinking of applying to medical school means that you've had a pretty good solid foundation in terms of studying - so surely you'd have your own successful revision method. I would suggest just continuing with that.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Reenaa2020)
Hi guys, currently doing Alevels. Was wondering how’s the workload and content wise( is it like difficult to understand?) in Medicine compared to Alevels!? Like how do you keep up, and make notes(I heard that there are also many slides so how do you decide if a particular content is worth including in your notes?) Anyone here can answer this plss) Feel free to leave tips here too thankiew🤪
Yeah see for me, pre-clinical was by far more intense. Starting clinical where you only had to attend the wards, no 3x weekly essays to be critiqued, was a dream. But I definitely know of med students at multiple other med schools who didn't report being worked very hard at all.

Difficult to understand... a little sometimes I guess? Certainly understanding was more important than memorising. But again depends on the topic and the med school. For example for us anatomy was in essay form, and mainly about linking form to function and how and why things evolved that way. We didn't even have to actually know muscle names. Whereas other places its literally about memorising the name, nerve, blood supply, attachments etc for each muscle.

Overall I think the most important, and predictable factors are 1) How hard you worked for A-level. If you worked hard then you will probably work really hard at med school. And 2) whether you still care about being top of the class or not. If you're gunning for a distinction you're going to put yourself under a lot more pressure than if you're ok being 9th decile.
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Reenaa2020
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Thank you for your input
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Anonymous778
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(Original post by nexttime)
Yeah see for me, pre-clinical was by far more intense. Starting clinical where you only had to attend the wards, no 3x weekly essays to be critiqued, was a dream. But I definitely know of med students at multiple other med schools who didn't report being worked very hard at all.

Difficult to understand... a little sometimes I guess? Certainly understanding was more important than memorising. But again depends on the topic and the med school. For example for us anatomy was in essay form, and mainly about linking form to function and how and why things evolved that way. We didn't even have to actually know muscle names. Whereas other places its literally about memorising the name, nerve, blood supply, attachments etc for each muscle.

Overall I think the most important, and predictable factors are 1) How hard you worked for A-level. If you worked hard then you will probably work really hard at med school. And 2) whether you still care about being top of the class or not. If you're gunning for a distinction you're going to put yourself under a lot more pressure than if you're ok being 9th decile.
3 essays a week😱, which medical school was this? If you don’t mind saying of course.
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(Original post by Anonymous778)
3 essays a week😱, which medical school was this? If you don’t mind saying of course.
Oxford. It varied by college, and if I'm honest it was more like 2-3 essays per week for the 3-4 tutorials per week.

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