Ava_Watson
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Why blockage at point C has greater consequences than point A and BName:  1605411222177.jpg
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Napp
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I would suggest, with respect, that if you havent been able to figure out that this forum is for news and not your homework then you have a deeper issue than not being able to figure out why your heart is blowing up.
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Ramipril
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Well follow the artery route of C, how much and which parts of the heart it supplies, and go from there.
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Ramipril
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(Original post by Napp)
I would suggest, with respect, that if you havent been able to figure out that this forum is for news and not your homework then you have a deeper issue than not being able to figure out why your heart is blowing up.
News? Pffft I come for the trolls (well I did :cry2: )
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Ava_Watson
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Well dose anyone have a model answer
I have an answer but it probably is one mark only but 3 marks are needed
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Ava_Watson
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(Original post by Napp)
I would suggest, with respect, that if you havent been able to figure out that this forum is for news and not your homework then you have a deeper issue than not being able to figure out why your heart is blowing up.
OK and so it doesn't seem like you have an answer thanks much appreciated
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Ava_Watson
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So my initial answer was because point C supplies blood to main wall of heart if it's blocked cardiac arrest could occur
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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(Original post by Ava_Watson)
So my initial answer was because point C supplies blood to main wall of heart if it's blocked cardiac arrest could occur
Hi Ava (?),
Sorry that you have not had any useful help, but rather even one sarcastic-sounding [?] comment, when all you are looking for is some guidance.

Let me assist you.
You cannot be expected to know the detailed anatomy of the left and right coronary arteries at A level, but if you follow a logical/rational approach, you will be able to work it out.

In this diagram, the two coronary arteries are originating from the first part of the aorta, very soon after its exit from the left ventricle, yeah? [this is near the top of the pic, where you will recognize the aorta as a large vessel like an upside-down "U" shape called the arch of the aorta], still with me?

Both the left and the right coronary arteries travel downwards [the left quite leftwards, too - remember this is like looking at a patient facing you, so the left artery is the one on your right [the patient's left i.e. with the blockages at B and C]. Blockage A is on a branch of the right coronary artery.

As the arteries branch, each branch is narrower and supplies a smaller part of the myocardium [Greek myo = muscle; cardios = heart so heart muscle, yeah?] as you might guess; therefore, the vessel at C [the main trunk of the left coronary artery] supplies a greater part of the myocardium than the smaller branches, with me.

So the answers you need for the marks are:-
a) C is a bigger artery
b) C supplies more muscle tissue
c) So more muscle dies if C is blocked
d) More serious lack of oxygen
e) (more severe heart attack/chest pain)

If you are aiming for A* or for synoptic essay Q,
--- this type of info can be provided by injecting a dye (called a contrast medium) into a blood vessel, and this will be carried to the heart, then a special X-ray [called a coronary angiogram] will show up the blocked arteries as in the pic. If you would like to see an example of such an X-ray, please PM me.
--- at B, the bigger branch [the one going vertically downwards] of the left coronary artery [the one on our right in your pic] is called the left anterior descending [LAD] artery [dw if you can't remember this - outside syllabus].

Good night & be safe!
M [specialist biology tutor]
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Ava_Watson
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Hi Ava (?),
Sorry that you have not had any useful help, but rather even one sarcastic-sounding [?] comment, when all you are looking for is some guidance.

Let me assist you.
You cannot be expected to know the detailed anatomy of the left and right coronary arteries at A level, but if you follow a logical/rational approach, you will be able to work it out.

In this diagram, the two coronary arteries are originating from the first part of the aorta, very soon after its exit from the left ventricle, yeah? [this is near the top of the pic, where you will recognize the aorta as a large vessel like an upside-down "U" shape called the arch of the aorta], still with me?

Both the left and the right coronary arteries travel downwards [the left quite leftwards, too - remember this is like looking at a patient facing you, so the left artery is the one on your right [the patient's left i.e. with the blockages at B and C]. Blockage A is on a branch of the right coronary artery.

As the arteries branch, each branch is narrower and supplies a smaller part of the myocardium [Greek myo = muscle; cardios = heart so heart muscle, yeah?] as you might guess; therefore, the vessel at C [the main trunk of the left coronary artery] supplies a greater part of the myocardium than the smaller branches, with me.

So the answers you need for the marks are:-
a) C is a bigger artery
b) C supplies more muscle tissue
c) So more muscle dies if C is blocked
d) More serious lack of oxygen
e) (more severe heart attack/chest pain)

If you are aiming for A* or for synoptic essay Q,
--- this type of info can be provided by injecting a dye (called a contrast medium) into a blood vessel, and this will be carried to the heart, then a special X-ray [called a coronary angiogram] will show up the blocked arteries as in the pic. If you would like to see an example of such an X-ray, please PM me.
--- at B, the bigger branch [the one going vertically downwards] of the left coronary artery [the one on our right in your pic] is called the left anterior descending [LAD] artery [dw if you can't remember this - outside syllabus].

Good night & be safe!
M [specialist biology tutor]
Thankyou this was very insightful and helpful indeed 😊
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