Electrical Engineering circuits..how many (essential) nodes here?

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sarah630
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#1
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#1
How many essential nodes are here? I thought it was one node because both are joining the same branches together (if not please correct me) and I've seen from other circuits we usually avoid the nodes that are like a repetition. Please can someone explain? Thank you!
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LuigiMario
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congrats on the drawing, it nearly works - one clarification, do you really show 5 resistors?

----/\/\/\/\/\/\/\-- this is one resistor whilst --/\/\/\----/\/\/\- is two resistors

it could be just haste in drawing?,

so you have at least the node where all three resistors meet, and the 'ground' node where the commons meet, = 2 nodes

and if you do have 5 resistors, not 3, then you have nodes inbetween the resistors too.... then maybe four nodes
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sarah630
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
congrats on the drawing, it nearly works - one clarification, do you really show 5 resistors?

----/\/\/\/\/\/\/\-- this is one resistor whilst --/\/\/\----/\/\/\- is two resistors

it could be just haste in drawing?,

so you have at least the node where all three resistors meet, and the 'ground' node where the commons meet, = 2 nodes

and if you do have 5 resistors, not 3, then you have nodes inbetween the resistors too.... then maybe four nodes
Thank you so much!!!
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Edward Johnson
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only one node
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uberteknik
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(Original post by sarah630)
How many essential nodes are here? I thought it was one node because both are joining the same branches together (if not please correct me) and I've seen from other circuits we usually avoid the nodes that are like a repetition. Please can someone explain? Thank you!
(Original post by LuigiMario)
congrats on the drawing, it nearly works - one clarification, do you really show 5 resistors?

----/\/\/\/\/\/\/\-- this is one resistor whilst --/\/\/\----/\/\/\- is two resistors

it could be just haste in drawing?,

so you have at least the node where all three resistors meet, and the 'ground' node where the commons meet, = 2 nodes

and if you do have 5 resistors, not 3, then you have nodes inbetween the resistors too.... then maybe four nodes
(Original post by Edward Johnson)
only one node
It's ONE ESSENTIAL NODE. The OP is missing several nodes. There are actually six nodes following LuigiMario's logic but only ONE is 'essential' following Edwards correct answer.

When dealing with Branches, Nodes and Loops, the convention is to refer to them using the collective nouns 'Network Topology' and 'Circuit Elements' rather than simply circuits.

Use these rules:

1) NETWORK: In network topology, we study the properties relating to the placement of elements in the network and the geometric configuration of the network. It’s all about circuit elements such as branches, nodes, and loops.

2) BRANCH: A branch represents a single element such as a voltage source or a resistor. In other words, a branch represents any two-terminal element.

3) NODE: A node is the point of connection between two or more branches.

4) ESSENTIAL NODE: is a node joining three or more elements.

5) LOOP: A loop is any closed path in a circuit.

6) SERIES: Two or more elements are in series if they exclusively share a single node and consequently carry the same current.

7) PARALLEL: Two or more elements are in parallel if they are connected to the same two nodes and consequently have the same voltage across.them.

Following these rules the network provided by the OP has ONE 'essential nodes'.

Nodes:

a) At the +ve terminal of the voltage source;

b) at the junction between the top most series resistors;

c) At the branch where the three resistors meet (top centre of OP's diagram);

d) At the junction between the second set of two series resistors;

e) At the junction of the two loops connecting the two lower resistors

f) At the -ve terminal of the voltage source.

Essential Node:

i) At the junction of the three resistors.

http://www.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Projects/...nto%20account.

https://electrical-engineering-porta...branches-loops
Last edited by uberteknik; 1 year ago
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Edward Johnson
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#6
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there is only one node, and one reference node at the bottom. IF you apply nodal analysis, you will realize that many nodes you think about from the diagram are repeated. SUch that you will only be required to find only one nodal voltage, which is in between the 3 resistors that meet up.
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Edward Johnson
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based on your interpretation, we have one essential (also called non-reference node) and 1referebce node at the bottom.
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uberteknik
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(Original post by Edward Johnson)
there is only one node, and one reference node at the bottom. IF you apply nodal analysis, you will realize that many nodes you think about from the diagram are repeated. SUch that you will only be required to find only one nodal voltage, which is in between the 3 resistors that meet up.
Yes. My bad. Corrected post accordingly.
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Edward Johnson
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no worries. if you need more help, one on one for that matter you may inbox me on the same and any other electrical and electronics courses
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Edward Johnson
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(Original post by uberteknik)
Yes. My bad. Corrected post accordingly.
no worries. if you need more help, one on one for that matter you may inbox me on the same and any other electrical and electronics courses
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sarah630
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#11
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(Original post by uberteknik)
It's ONE ESSENTIAL NODE. The OP is missing several nodes. There are actually six nodes following LuigiMario's logic but only ONE is 'essential' following Edwards correct answer.

When dealing with Branches, Nodes and Loops, the convention is to refer to them using the collective nouns 'Network Topology' and 'Circuit Elements' rather than simply circuits.

Use these rules:

1) NETWORK: In network topology, we study the properties relating to the placement of elements in the network and the geometric configuration of the network. It’s all about circuit elements such as branches, nodes, and loops.

2) BRANCH: A branch represents a single element such as a voltage source or a resistor. In other words, a branch represents any two-terminal element.

3) NODE: A node is the point of connection between two or more branches.

4) ESSENTIAL NODE: is a node joining three or more elements.

5) LOOP: A loop is any closed path in a circuit.

6) SERIES: Two or more elements are in series if they exclusively share a single node and consequently carry the same current.

7) PARALLEL: Two or more elements are in parallel if they are connected to the same two nodes and consequently have the same voltage across.them.

Following these rules the network provided by the OP has ONE 'essential nodes'.

Nodes:

a) At the +ve terminal of the voltage source;

b) at the junction between the top most series resistors;

c) At the branch where the three resistors meet (top centre of OP's diagram);

d) At the junction between the second set of two series resistors;

e) At the junction of the two loops connecting the two lower resistors

f) At the -ve terminal of the voltage source.

Essential Node:

i) At the junction of the three resistors.

http://www.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Projects/...nto%20account.

https://electrical-engineering-porta...branches-loops
THANK YOU VERY MUCH for your help!😀👍👍
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