Chemisathtics
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Hi Everyone, I'm in a dilemma between studying Advanced Chemical Engineering or Computer Science.

I have graduated with a 1st class honours in Chemical Engineering from the university of Sheffield. I have really enjoyed programming modules such as Matlab and python, but I wouldn't say I have strong knowledge or adequate knowledge to study advanced computer science for my masters.

I have been offered a place from Cambridge for MPhil Advanced Chemical Engineering however it is not accredited. I've also been offered a place for for the MSc Advanced Chemical Engineering at Imperial which is accredited.

The computing programme offered at Imperial however is not accredited. I would like to get into the tech industry and so I'd like to have a masters ideally in Computer science. I'm just unsure about the importance of having a masters degree that's accredited.

Does anyone have any thoughts about this?
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Smack
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(Original post by Chemisathtics)
Hi Everyone, I'm in a dilemma between studying Advanced Chemical Engineering or Computer Science.

I have graduated with a 1st class honours in Chemical Engineering from the university of Sheffield. I have really enjoyed programming modules such as Matlab and python, but I wouldn't say I have strong knowledge or adequate knowledge to study advanced computer science for my masters.

I have been offered a place from Cambridge for MPhil Advanced Chemical Engineering however it is not accredited. I've also been offered a place for for the MSc Advanced Chemical Engineering at Imperial which is accredited.

The computing programme offered at Imperial however is not accredited. I would like to get into the tech industry and so I'd like to have a masters ideally in Computer science. I'm just unsure about the importance of having a masters degree that's accredited.

Does anyone have any thoughts about this?
If you want to get into the tech industry, then surely a masters in computer science would be far more useful? I don't see the purpose of doing a masters in chemical engineering unless you're specifically looking at engineering.
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Chemisathtics
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(Original post by Smack)
If you want to get into the tech industry, then surely a masters in computer science would be far more useful? I don't see the purpose of doing a masters in chemical engineering unless you're specifically looking at engineering.
You're right, but the masters for computer science is not accredited. I don't know if employers will accept this as a masters

https://www.imperial.ac.uk/computing...msc-computing/
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Compost
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Accredited degrees are mainly important if you want to get chartered. The simplest way to satisfy the academic requirements for chartered engineer are to have an accredited MEng or accredited BEng and MSc. However, even if you don't it's still possibly to get chartered -as there are other way of providing the evidence you have gained the necessary academic background.

I don't think the fact that the degree isn't accredited it significant, it sounds as though it's a conversion Masters for people who haven't taken a first degree in Comp Sci (rather than Advanced Comp Sci) and so wouldn't qualify a masters degree for accreditation - that doesn't stop it being an excellent course (I don't know either way).
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Chemisathtics
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(Original post by Compost)
Accredited degrees are mainly important if you want to get chartered. The simplest way to satisfy the academic requirements for chartered engineer are to have an accredited MEng or accredited BEng and MSc. However, even if you don't it's still possibly to get chartered -as there are other way of providing the evidence you have gained the necessary academic background.

I don't think the fact that the degree isn't accredited it significant, it sounds as though it's a conversion Masters for people who haven't taken a first degree in Comp Sci (rather than Advanced Comp Sci) and so wouldn't qualify a masters degree for accreditation - that doesn't stop it being an excellent course (I don't know either way).
Thank you for this, I appreciate it. I do want to be chartered eventually if I go into the tech industry. This year, I'll be undertaking independent courses on Udemi and see if I can apply for the advanced computer science. Either way, I most probably will accept the Imperial computing programme.
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Smack
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(Original post by Chemisathtics)
Thank you for this, I appreciate it. I do want to be chartered eventually if I go into the tech industry. This year, I'll be undertaking independent courses on Udemi and see if I can apply for the advanced computer science. Either way, I most probably will accept the Imperial computing programme.
Is chartership even a thing in tech?
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Compost
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(Original post by Smack)
Is chartership even a thing in tech?
Yes https://www.bcs.org/get-qualified/become-chartered/ but I don't think it has the same importance as for most engineering
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AndyChow
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ChemEng dead subject with no jobs
In CS, accreditation means close to absolutely nothing. It's so broad, if you apply for Java roles they will want OCP certificate not accreditation, if you apply for AWS roles they want AWS certificates.
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AndyChow
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(Original post by Chemisathtics)
Thank you for this, I appreciate it. I do want to be chartered eventually if I go into the tech industry. This year, I'll be undertaking independent courses on Udemi and see if I can apply for the advanced computer science. Either way, I most probably will accept the Imperial computing programme.
Imperial only lets you do 1 application a year.
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CaptainSkyston
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(Original post by AndyChow)
ChemEng dead subject with no jobs
With all due respect, I don't think you understand ChemEng
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AndyChow
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(Original post by CaptainSkyston)
With all due respect, I don't think you understand ChemEng
Ok then, because I know a really smart person who did chemeng at Cambridge and he converted to CS because no jobs.

if chemeng has a bright future I wonder why is so many of ChemEng graduates are converting to cs degree then? Because MPhil at Cambridge is more prestigious and highly regarded in comparison to a conversion degree
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CaptainSkyston
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(Original post by AndyChow)
Ok then, because I know a really smart person who did chemeng at Cambridge and he converted to CS because no jobs.

if chemeng has a bright future I wonder why are you doing a conversion cs degree then? Because MPhil at Cambridge is more prestigious and highly regarded in comparison to a conversion degree
I'm actually here during a key term search for Chem Eng. While the UK is poor on the jobs (As far as the UK goes, we all are), internationally Chem Eng is one of the most lucrative fields going. Since Chem Eng is industrialising new processes, there will never *not* be a demand for chem eng, it just depends where your priorities are.
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AndyChow
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(Original post by CaptainSkyston)
I'm actually here during a key term search for Chem Eng. While the UK is poor on the jobs (As far as the UK goes, we all are), internationally Chem Eng is one of the most lucrative fields going. Since Chem Eng is industrialising new processes, there will never *not* be a demand for chem eng, it just depends where your priorities are.
Looking at your comment history it seems like you are an A-Level student applying for MEng Chemical engineering 2021.
In which case I recommend you to finish your 4 year studies in 2025 and then we can discuss in further detail.
Because even though you may be correct, your limited life experience does not give your arguments any weight.
We both seems to be in consensus that ChemEng has no jobs, in the UK, which should settle any disagreements
I wish you the best of luck in your UCAS applications
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Chemisathtics
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(Original post by AndyChow)
Looking at your comment history it seems like you are an A-Level student applying for MEng Chemical engineering 2021.
In which case I recommend you to finish your 4 year studies in 2025 and then we can discuss in further detail.
Because even though you may be correct, your limited life experience does not give your arguments any weight.
We both seems to be in consensus that ChemEng has no jobs, in the UK, which should settle any disagreements
I wish you the best of luck in your UCAS applications
I strongly disagree with this. The prospects and job markets available for Chemical Engineers is huge. There will always be a requirement for chemical engineers for the environment, water treatment, pharmaceuticals, energy, nuclear, finance, investment banking (even though finance and banking isn't traditionally chemical engineering, both sects absolutely love chemical engineers), and many more. Everyone I know who has studied Chemical Engineering has found a job in process, pharmaceuticals, energy etc. I personally chose to lean towards technology because I enjoyed undertaking programming modules at university. Everyone is different. The only aspect of chemical engineering which is dying in the future is oil and gas, however this places a focus on chemical engineers to produce new and innovative forms of energy. The increase in population will require more and more energy, and it's chemical engineers who are traditionally required to meet those demands. Inevitably, there is and always will be a steady increase in demand for chemical engineers. The only edge computer science has over chemical engineering is a larger job market.
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AndyChow
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(Original post by Chemisathtics)
The only edge computer science has over chemical engineering is a larger job market.
/closed

I made a mistake calling it dead, it's just oversaturated and a lot of competition for the available jobs. It's a simple supply vs demand thing. Huge and growing demand for biomedicine too but the volume of undergrads has lead to heavy credentialism. Finance & investment banking, those are jobs every STEM (and non-STEM) student goes for when they can't find relevant jobs, ChemEng is not even that high up in the IB hierarchy.
Last edited by AndyChow; 4 days ago
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