Student_256
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Okay, in my GCSEs I am aiming for six 9s and two 8s - the eights being in English language and literature. I am on track to achieve all of them... except English literature. My problem is, I completely despise literature with a passion and would rather stand in the middle of a motorway than read Macbeth. I know it sounds like the solution is to just revise it but my problem is that I can't. Give me any other subject and I'll happily revise it for hours on end but the second you hand me a literature textbook I'll suddenly feel no motivation to do anything. When I start reading any of that 18th-century rubbish I feel as though I am wasting my time and get a sudden urge to solve maths problems. Does anybody have any tips for how I can motivate myself to do it?

Thanks in advance.

(p.s. I have a literature mock exam tomorrow where I am predicted to get 4 grades below target.)
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cassielle
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I generally viewed every single GCSE subject as an annoyance, but I never passionately disliked any of them lol
You could either just force yourself through it (ask a family member or friend to just sit there, take away your other subject's revision materials, and make you study English for half an hour) although I doubt how efficient that'll be, but there really is no getting out of revising, even if you hate the subject, if you're going to take the exam
I'm not sure how efficient this will be for other people, but personally, I watching film adaptations or just generally reading the stories without thinking about having to write essays on them helped a lot. Once you start getting familiar with and enjoying the characters, the authors, and the story, it gets a lot easier to remember and think about the more exam-based parts. (I also ended up discovering the dark academia aesthetic and it did wonders for my motivation) Generally, finding different ways to absorb and understand the material you're studying might help with your dislike of it.
On the other hand, you can tell yourself that once you take the GCSE, you can burn all your literature books and never pick up Shakespeare again. Again, not sure how motivating or effective this'll be, but some people might be able to study like that ...?

(This probably wasn't helpful at all, sorry ><)
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cassielle
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(Original post by Student_256)
Okay, in my GCSEs I am aiming for six 9s and two 8s - the eights being in English language and literature. I am on track to achieve all of them... except English literature. My problem is, I completely despise literature with a passion and would rather stand in the middle of a motorway than read Macbeth. I know it sounds like the solution is to just revise it but my problem is that I can't. Give me any other subject and I'll happily revise it for hours on end but the second you hand me a literature textbook I'll suddenly feel no motivation to do anything. When I start reading any of that 18th-century rubbish I feel as though I am wasting my time and get a sudden urge to solve maths problems. Does anybody have any tips for how I can motivate myself to do it?

Thanks in advance.

(p.s. I have a literature mock exam tomorrow where I am predicted to get 4 grades below target.)
I generally viewed every single GCSE subject as an annoyance, but I never passionately disliked any of them lol

You could either just force yourself through it (ask a family member or friend to just sit there, take away your other subject's revision materials, and make you study English for half an hour) although I doubt how efficient that'll be, but there really is no getting out of revising, even if you hate the subject, if you're going to take the exam

I'm not sure how efficient this will be for other people, but personally, I watching film adaptations or just generally reading the stories without thinking about having to write essays on them helped a lot. Once you start getting familiar with and enjoying the characters, the authors, and the story, it gets a lot easier to remember and think about the more exam-based parts. (I also ended up discovering the dark academia aesthetic and it did wonders for my motivation) Generally, finding different ways to absorb and understand the material you're studying might help with your dislike of it.

On the other hand, you can tell yourself that once you take the GCSE, you can burn all your literature books and never pick up Shakespeare again. Again, not sure how motivating or effective this'll be, but some people might be able to study like that ...?



(This probably wasn't helpful at all, sorry ><
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crusty kebab
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memorise a few quotes for each character/theme and write an essay plan for every possible question. Write out a few full answers and get a teacher to mark it.
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tinygirl96
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For English I did lots of old question papers. Try to use plain flashcards and note making too. Analyse your written answers for level of quality and learn about the content as well. Pick out some fancy words that impress you etc. Understand a set text completely from head to toe. Prepare a list of themes to look at.
Focus on what really makes a good top notch answer. Hone your revision technique and exam skills in addition. When answering old exam questions try to make a mental note of the number of marks for each question. Read beyond the lines of the text set in class. Jot down ideas on paper.
Pull out all the stops when revising. Do not stick to one single revision method but mix it up. Try out some others. Buy and then use some recommended revision guides as well for extra substance. Use teacher feedback to make any improvements and corrections. Discuss your texts.
Make sure that you know what to do for the highest marks. Avoid repetition or one word answers here as far as possible. Your answers do need to make sense. The number of marks can form the basis of your written answers.
Use them as brain fodder in other words. Try to remain calm. This is only a exam not a death sentence. Get sleep and exercise. Revise properly. If something fails try another technique instead.
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