Dont know what to do at uni

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Qwert007
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
I was going to apply to medicine or dentistry bit didn’t get the grades i needed. I’m thinking if applying to study:
• nutrition to become a dietitian
• pharmacy
•nursing
• a science
Which one of these is better to study in terms of the future? If I apply to pharmacy or nutrition i would need another 2-3 courses to apply to but I probably wouldn’t be able to apply to one of these courses asy personal statement won’t habing anything to do with the other course im applying to. I’m really confused at the moment and don’t know what to do. I’ll like a course but then I’ll start thinking about it’s downfalls and other courses. I’ve just been in this same cycle since I got my exam results. I’m trying to get into Uni instead of doing a gap year bc i dont know what to do in it and feel like i will just waste it. Im also scared that I might not get into Uni after taking a gap year.
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McGinger
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#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
Maybe you need to take some time out and just 'work in a hospital/care role' until you have a clearer idea of what you want to do.
NHS Jobs : https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/
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moosec
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#3
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#3
My best friend studied to become a Dietitian, she’s always advised to look for courses that include Dietetics in the title (her course was ‘Nutrition & Dietetics’) as some standalone Nutrition courses won’t allow you to register as a Dietician (as Nutritionists and Dieticians are two different roles.)

I’m a student nurse, so I can maybe help with some info about Nursing.
Nursing degrees are accredited by the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) so it will allow you to register and work as a nurse as soon as you qualify. There are 4 fields to choose from: Adult, Child, Mental Health and Learning Disabilities (and of course once you qualify in your field you can specialise even further.) Its an intense degree... it’s an NMC requirement to have 2,300hours of theory and 2,300hours of practice placement... so basically 50% of your course is spent at university and 50% is out in various settings in the NHS (and private sector) getting practical experience.
In terms of the future, there’s a major staff shortage in the NHS right now & they’re crying out for Nurses (my uni has a 100% employment rate for Nursing after graduation.) The fact that you spend half your time out in practice is helpful as well, oftentimes you’ll get a job in an area that you’ve had placement in.
Progression is alright as well, you’re able to move up to roles such as Clinical Team Leader, Ward Manager/Sister, Nurse Prescriber, Advanced Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Consultant etc.
I’ll be totally transparent about the intensity of the course, and the fact that sometimes you’ll see some truly saddening things, but at the same time its such a rewarding career & you change lives every day
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Coventry University Student Ambassadors
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#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Qwert007)
I was going to apply to medicine or dentistry bit didn’t get the grades i needed. I’m thinking if applying to study:
• nutrition to become a dietitian
• pharmacy
•nursing
• a science
Which one of these is better to study in terms of the future? If I apply to pharmacy or nutrition i would need another 2-3 courses to apply to but I probably wouldn’t be able to apply to one of these courses asy personal statement won’t habing anything to do with the other course im applying to. I’m really confused at the moment and don’t know what to do. I’ll like a course but then I’ll start thinking about it’s downfalls and other courses. I’ve just been in this same cycle since I got my exam results. I’m trying to get into Uni instead of doing a gap year bc i dont know what to do in it and feel like i will just waste it. Im also scared that I might not get into Uni after taking a gap year.
Hey!

I hope you're well and looking after yourself

I'm a current student studying Dietetics so I could try to answer some questions if you have any regarding Nutrition and Dietetics.
If you're interested in Nutrition to become a Dietitian, it's advisable for you to do a Dietetics degree as oppose to a Nutrition degree as the profession is protected and regulated by the law and only those who practice Dietetics can call themselves Dietitians after completing a degree, and are able to work in both clinical and community settings. This ensures that Dietitians are always working at the highest standard when working. Whereas a Nutrition degree, you cannot but you would be registered with the Nutrition Association. However, you are able to work in a variety of settings to your interest.

Becoming a Dietitian means you become a registered dietitian, following 3 or 4 years of studying at uni with a registration from the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Depending on the length of your course, you may do a placement as part of your course or do a year in placement where you will cover almost all areas of conditions impacted by nutrition and learn how nutrition relates to health and be able to apply that to case studies, assignments and placement.
Admittedly, it's an intense course. There is a LOT to learn as you are expected to learn all you need to in preparation for placement and do a certain amount of hours on placement to become a dietitian.
However, saying this, the course is rewarding, and becoming a dietitian means helping people improve their lives and that is what I'm interested in. It's also important to take care of yourself during the course due to the intensity so having a support network is crucial.
If you're interested in food, science, an interest in helping others maybe this is something you can look into or ask more about!

In terms of reality and the current climate, there is a shortage of dietitians and more are needed because there is vital work that needs to be done to help the patients. It's quite often that Dietitians are misunderstood and people claim Dietitians tell people what to eat. When, in fact, Dietitians only want the best and for people to recognise the consequences of what is happening. Dietitians are an expert in managing nutrition and health and have a strong desire to help people improve theirs by making adjustable changes that don't involve eating salad every day.

For future careers, you can also become a Nutritionist or you can explore other avenues to see what's available. You don't necessarily have to work as a Dietitian in the NHS if that isn't where you want to end up. There is a multitude of different areas to work in such as industry, private companies, freelancing, private etc.

If you have any questions to ask, I'm happy to answer

I hope this helps!

Veronica
BSc Dietetics Student
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Qwert007
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#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by moosec)
My best friend studied to become a Dietitian, she’s always advised to look for courses that include Dietetics in the title (her course was ‘Nutrition & Dietetics’) as some standalone Nutrition courses won’t allow you to register as a Dietician (as Nutritionists and Dieticians are two different roles.)

I’m a student nurse, so I can maybe help with some info about Nursing.
Nursing degrees are accredited by the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) so it will allow you to register and work as a nurse as soon as you qualify. There are 4 fields to choose from: Adult, Child, Mental Health and Learning Disabilities (and of course once you qualify in your field you can specialise even further.) Its an intense degree... it’s an NMC requirement to have 2,300hours of theory and 2,300hours of practice placement... so basically 50% of your course is spent at university and 50% is out in various settings in the NHS (and private sector) getting practical experience.
In terms of the future, there’s a major staff shortage in the NHS right now & they’re crying out for Nurses (my uni has a 100% employment rate for Nursing after graduation.) The fact that you spend half your time out in practice is helpful as well, oftentimes you’ll get a job in an area that you’ve had placement in.
Progression is alright as well, you’re able to move up to roles such as Clinical Team Leader, Ward Manager/Sister, Nurse Prescriber, Advanced Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Consultant etc.
I’ll be totally transparent about the intensity of the course, and the fact that sometimes you’ll see some truly saddening things, but at the same time its such a rewarding career & you change lives every day
Hi,

Are nurses treated righ? Because I’ve heard so many stories where nurses are getting overworked and don’t get breaks and end up becoming burnt out. Also is this a good career for someone with anxiety? I also get overwhelmed pretty quickly.

Thankyou
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Ramipril
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#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
Get a healthcare job which doesn't require a degree and go forwards from there. You don't need to go to university right now. There are also nursing courses where you start out as an HCA and then go down the nursing pathway and you get paid whilst studying since you'll be working.
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Ramipril
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#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by Qwert007)
Hi,

Are nurses treated righ? Because I’ve heard so many stories where nurses are getting overworked and don’t get breaks and end up becoming burnt out. Also is this a good career for someone with anxiety? I also get overwhelmed pretty quickly.

Thankyou
Are they treated right? Well depends where you're working and who you ask. There are plenty of nurses who deal with all that and still don't want to quit.
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Qwert007
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#8
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Coventry University Student Ambassadors)
Hey!

I hope you're well and looking after yourself

I'm a current student studying Dietetics so I could try to answer some questions if you have any regarding Nutrition and Dietetics.
If you're interested in Nutrition to become a Dietitian, it's advisable for you to do a Dietetics degree as oppose to a Nutrition degree as the profession is protected and regulated by the law and only those who practice Dietetics can call themselves Dietitians after completing a degree, and are able to work in both clinical and community settings. This ensures that Dietitians are always working at the highest standard when working. Whereas a Nutrition degree, you cannot but you would be registered with the Nutrition Association. However, you are able to work in a variety of settings to your interest.

Becoming a Dietitian means you become a registered dietitian, following 3 or 4 years of studying at uni with a registration from the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Depending on the length of your course, you may do a placement as part of your course or do a year in placement where you will cover almost all areas of conditions impacted by nutrition and learn how nutrition relates to health and be able to apply that to case studies, assignments and placement.
Admittedly, it's an intense course. There is a LOT to learn as you are expected to learn all you need to in preparation for placement and do a certain amount of hours on placement to become a dietitian.
However, saying this, the course is rewarding, and becoming a dietitian means helping people improve their lives and that is what I'm interested in. It's also important to take care of yourself during the course due to the intensity so having a support network is crucial.
If you're interested in food, science, an interest in helping others maybe this is something you can look into or ask more about!

In terms of reality and the current climate, there is a shortage of dietitians and more are needed because there is vital work that needs to be done to help the patients. It's quite often that Dietitians are misunderstood and people claim Dietitians tell people what to eat. When, in fact, Dietitians only want the best and for people to recognise the consequences of what is happening. Dietitians are an expert in managing nutrition and health and have a strong desire to help people improve theirs by making adjustable changes that don't involve eating salad every day.

For future careers, you can also become a Nutritionist or you can explore other avenues to see what's available. You don't necessarily have to work as a Dietitian in the NHS if that isn't where you want to end up. There is a multitude of different areas to work in such as industry, private companies, freelancing, private etc.

If you have any questions to ask, I'm happy to answer

I hope this helps!

Veronica
BSc Dietetics Student
Hi,

Yes I know that you need a degree that’s accredited that’s why I said that I can only apply to 2 University- theres only two unis near me that are registered with HCPC and I cant study anywhere else.
Do you know what other courses I can apply to along with Nutrition? I’m worried that my personal statement will be too vague If I try to write it in a way to be able to apply to more than one course and that I wont get in if i apply for a course with a personal statement about dietics.
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moosec
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#9
Report 1 year ago
#9
(Original post by Qwert007)
Hi,

Are nurses treated righ? Because I’ve heard so many stories where nurses are getting overworked and don’t get breaks and end up becoming burnt out. Also is this a good career for someone with anxiety? I also get overwhelmed pretty quickly.

Thankyou
Honestly it depends on the Trust, field of nursing, type of service you’re in etc. I’m on placement in Community Mental Health and although we’re busy (especially rn due to covid) we still manage our lunch breaks and there’s staff support in place to try reduce any burnout. I know this might not be true for all settings though, so it’s worth looking into fields/ areas you might be interested in so you can learn more about the types of services involved, the shift patterns you might face etc.

Honestly only you can answer that, as I don’t know the severity of your anxiety or triggers etc. I will say, however, that there are many people with mental health diagnoses on my course - and we all receive really good support from placement areas and the university.
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Coventry University Student Ambassadors
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#10
Report 1 year ago
#10
(Original post by Qwert007)
Hi,

Yes I know that you need a degree that’s accredited that’s why I said that I can only apply to 2 University- theres only two unis near me that are registered with HCPC and I cant study anywhere else.
Do you know what other courses I can apply to along with Nutrition? I’m worried that my personal statement will be too vague If I try to write it in a way to be able to apply to more than one course and that I wont get in if i apply for a course with a personal statement about dietics.
Hey,

Thank you for getting back to me! Apologies for repeating what you already know.

Courses along with Nutrition... are you still looking for an accredited Nutrition degree? Have you had a chance to look on the Accreditation for Nutrition website to look at the courses and unis available? From what I can see, there are Nutrition and Health (Cork Institue of Technology), Food, Nutrition and Health (Abertay University), Nutrition and Health Science (Athlone Institute Technology), Nutrition and Health (Edge Hill University), Nutrition (Exercise and Health) (Kingston University), Nutrition, Food and Health (Leeds Trinity) and Food and Nutrition - community Nutrition based (Liverpool John Moores).

Since the courses you listed are all health-based, all the professions relate to each other in some way shape, or form, so explaining why you're interested in health and being in that kind of setting is always a good start.

Do you have anymore questions concerning Dietetics and Nutrition?

Veronica
BSc Dietetics Student
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artful_lounger
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#11
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#11
As oft said by ecolier, if medicine is your end goal it is much better to take the year out, resit whatever exams you need to, and judiciously select the medical schools you are going to apply to based on which will accept those resits and that your application profile best fits to maximise your chances of getting an offer. Doing medicine as a graduate not only takes longer to eventually begin working as a FY1, and is much more expensive in particular requiring you to pay at least some and potentially a lot costs out of pocket for the course, but for the accelerated GEM courses specifically they are also much more competitive than standard entry medicine anyway.

You have literally nothing to lose and everything to gain by taking a year out, resitting your exams, and making the most of things to get onto the course you actual want to do. Also less practically, in my opinion it is quite disingenuous to pursue an AHP course if you don't have any commitment to that profession and are just using it as a platform to go into another profession, and you know that from the get-go.

Of course the above supposes you do have a strong commitment to medicine, which I'm not sure is the case since you stated you were planning to do "medicine or dentistry" before considering a slew of AHP and other courses as an alternative. I think it would be much better then to take the gap year to actually get the appropriate work experience for those different courses in the different professions, to get some idea of what you actually want to do.

Speaking from experience of not having done what I am suggesting (not in terms of medicine or any healthcare related courses but generally), it is much better, less stressful, and cheaper to take a year, or two or three, out after school to figure out what you want to do in life and then make the necessary preparations to pursue what you do decide to do wholeheartedly, than the alternative. Forcing yourself to go to university, doing some course chosen for fairly arbitrary reasons and milling around without really being committed to it, maybe changing course (maybe a few times) or withdrawing before finishing, or getting a mediocre degree result due to that, and only then after all that figuring out what you want to do is extremely stressful, takes up a much larger chunk of your life than you are "losing" due to taking one (or more) gap year, and with potentially very major long term financial ramifications.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 year ago
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