Franco28
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Hello✨ i hope you can help me!
Im getting straight As and A* on my A Levels and Im really getting really high grades on Spanish as I love languages (the only one I dont like is French which is hard for me). I was thinking maybe I should do a Law Degree and Languages Degree? Would this be okay? Im looking into be a solicitor or a barrister. But also what type of degree should i do if i decide this? Major and Minor Degree? Joint Degree? Is there more types of degrees? Or should I only focus on Law? Also how do I apply for this degrees?

Thank you so much!
0
reply
litstudent30
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Firstly, to be a lawyer, you do NOT need to have a law degree. You could simply study modern language, and then do a 1-year conversion course.

Many universities do Law with Modern Languages - Leicester Uni offers this course: https://le.ac.uk/courses/law-with-a-...guage-llb/2021
0
reply
Kyramoore1
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Franco28)
Hello✨ i hope you can help me!
Im getting straight As and A* on my A Levels and Im really getting really high grades on Spanish as I love languages (the only one I dont like is French which is hard for me). I was thinking maybe I should do a Law Degree and Languages Degree? Would this be okay? Im looking into be a solicitor or a barrister. But also what type of degree should i do if i decide this? Major and Minor Degree? Joint Degree? Is there more types of degrees? Or should I only focus on Law? Also how do I apply for this degrees?

Thank you so much!
Like the person said above, you don’t have to do a law degree. Most unis offer law with a language, or you could do a language degree by itself.
0
reply
Franco28
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by litstudent30)
Firstly, to be a lawyer, you do NOT need to have a law degree. You could simply study modern language, and then do a 1-year conversion course.

Many universities do Law with Modern Languages - Leicester Uni offers this course: https://le.ac.uk/courses/law-with-a-...guage-llb/2021
Yes I know that, but I think doing a Law Degree will help me choose which type of law I wanna follow as I will be going through a lot of types of law such as criminal Law and Land Law and more so it would help me choose what I want to do when it comes to a legal career. Also, how does a convertion work? And which ones does workplaces prefer? A Law Degree and a Modern Language Degree? A Modern Degree with a convertion? Or only focus on Law Degree?
0
reply
Catherine1973
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
My uni does law with French, it’s llb and 4 years with last 2 years a in a French university so that’s an option!
0
reply
Franco28
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by Catherine1973)
My uni does law with French, it’s llb and 4 years with last 2 years a in a French university so that’s an option!
Which uni do you go to?✨
0
reply
Franco28
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Kyramoore1)
Like the person said above, you don’t have to do a law degree. Most unis offer law with a language, or you could do a language degree by itself.
But how do you do a convertion into law?
0
reply
Kyramoore1
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by Franco28)
But how do you do a convertion into law?
You don’t need to do a conversion anymore, the SQE is open to any degree.
0
reply
Kyramoore1
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by Franco28)
Yes I know that, but I think doing a Law Degree will help me choose which type of law I wanna follow as I will be going through a lot of types of law such as criminal Law and Land Law and more so it would help me choose what I want to do when it comes to a legal career. Also, how does a convertion work? And which ones does workplaces prefer? A Law Degree and a Modern Language Degree? A Modern Degree with a convertion? Or only focus on Law Degree?
I’m not 100% sure but I would think that firms would like someone who can speak another language.
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by Franco28)
Hello✨ i hope you can help me!
Im getting straight As and A* on my A Levels and Im really getting really high grades on Spanish as I love languages (the only one I dont like is French which is hard for me).
Law with Spanish is available at lots of good unis. Having high level language skills in addition to a law degree can only be a good thing.

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/undergra...panish-law-llb

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...Spanish-Law-BA

https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/unde...w-and-spanish/

https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/g947/law...spanic-law-llb

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/study/und...w-hispanic-law
0
reply
17Student17
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
If you do languages instead of law you have then to study for the SQE1 (probably doing an SQE1 course) and then take the SQE1 exams. I f you read law then you can probably do SQE1 the same summer as you graduate or earlier with no SQE1 preparation course so law will probably save you time and money and I adored my law degree so am a bit biased. You will qualify quicker and probably have less debt. however loads of people including my lawyer daughters did a different degree first and then did law after. Half of the trainee solicitors read law and half not and it makes no different whether you do or don't.
I had one law interview when the interviewer then started the whole thing in German (I have German A level) which went fine actually but illustrates how for some firms languages are very useful. I havee found my French ( O level, now GCSE) useful too at times as a lawyer
0
reply
Franco28
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by 17Student17)
If you do languages instead of law you have then to study for the SQE1 (probably doing an SQE1 course) and then take the SQE1 exams. I f you read law then you can probably do SQE1 the same summer as you graduate or earlier with no SQE1 preparation course so law will probably save you time and money and I adored my law degree so am a bit biased. You will qualify quicker and probably have less debt. however loads of people including my lawyer daughters did a different degree first and then did law after. Half of the trainee solicitors read law and half not and it makes no different whether you do or don't.
I had one law interview when the interviewer then started the whole thing in German (I have German A level) which went fine actually but illustrates how for some firms languages are very useful. I havee found my French ( O level, now GCSE) useful too at times as a lawyer
I actually decided to do a Law Degree and follow my plan A (which was just to do the Law Degree). It os true it can take longer and I actually prefer to have a law degree rather than a year long law course. I understand that it won’t make much a difference but I will feel proud to have the degree. Im doing A Level Spanish and Im really killing it so there’s where the idea of doing Languages Degree came from. The thing im kinda worried about is the LNAT i have to sit this September-October. Im just so stressed. And also about my law interview as idk what stuff i must know.
0
reply
Franco28
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#13
Thank you✨ i’ll check them
0
reply
Franco28
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by Kyramoore1)
I’m not 100% sure but I would think that firms would like someone who can speak another language.
Do you think maybe I could something related to languages? like higher education in languages even if i do Law or a one year course in languages?
0
reply
harrysbar
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by Franco28)
I actually decided to do a Law Degree and follow my plan A (which was just to do the Law Degree). It os true it can take longer and I actually prefer to have a law degree rather than a year long law course. I understand that it won’t make much a difference but I will feel proud to have the degree. Im doing A Level Spanish and Im really killing it so there’s where the idea of doing Languages Degree came from. The thing im kinda worried about is the LNAT i have to sit this September-October. Im just so stressed. And also about my law interview as idk what stuff i must know.
There won't be an interview if you are applying for straight Law rather than Law with Languages. Most unis don't interview for the LLB apart from York and Oxbridge.
0
reply
Catherine1973
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
My uni in a non covid year had a language centre which would also do classes for non language students. So various levels of skills and a few different languages. Ran Wednesday afternoon all year. Around £250 I think? So you can still work on a language without studying it at degree level.
1
reply
Kyramoore1
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
(Original post by Franco28)
Do you think maybe I could something related to languages? like higher education in languages even if i do Law or a one year course in languages?
Yeah I think having any qualification in a language would be sufficient, even if it was GCSE.
0
reply
Franco28
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#18
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by Kyramoore1)
Yeah I think having any qualification in a language would be sufficient, even if it was GCSE.
Yeah i had an A* (9) on Spanish GCSE and still having A* on Spanish A Level
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#19
Report 1 month ago
#19
Doi more research.
Get into the best uni you can that also meets your other criteria.
Have a look at Law with Spanish or even Law with Spanish Law as that might involve a year aborad, if Spain is your passion.
1
reply
Dr_Fronk123
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 month ago
#20
If you are serious about going into a career in law, then I would say either find a Law/Languages joint course of some kind or just do straight LLB Law and study languages as a short course on the side/as a hobby.

There seem to be a few simplifications on this thread, so let me clear a few things up. I recently went to a virtual law fair so there were a lot of questions about the transition to SQE and what it would entail (I am a non-law grad considering becoming a solicitor myself), so here are a few things to keep in mind:

1. By the time you graduate, GDL will not be an option (unless you want to become a Barrister). You want to be a solicitor in the UK, the SQE will be the only way to do it.

2. It is very tempting to think, "oh, as long as I work hard for the SQE, I can do whatever undergrad degree I want". One advisor selling a SQE prep course was saying that studying around 10 hours a week would be sufficient, and that I could do a full-time job alongside it. This seems like total crap, considering how much knowledge you had to cram for the previous GDL course.

Please bear in mind, the SQE is cheaper, yes, but it is around £1,800 for each attempt for each part of the SQE (SQE1 and 2). I've spoken to several law firms as well who are doubting non-law grads whose only basis in legal knowledge is the SQE prep course- 40 weeks part-time prep just doesn't seem enough. Even if you do make it through the SQE, sure, you have the same qualification, but unless you fully commit and go above what's expected (and can demonstrate this) on the learning side of it, you won't have the same educational backbone. Hiring managers at law firms are not idiots and they will be considering this in many cases.

Bottom line is this: if you want to be a solicitor without doing any sort of Law at undergrad level, then you either have to go far above what's recommended for you on the SQE prep courses (and to keep committing yourself to learning after that) or do a full-time Masters/Postgrad prep course that will give you the skills for both parts of the SQE (I know that several unis are adjusting their postgraduate courses to account for this).
Last edited by Dr_Fronk123; 1 month ago
2
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you experienced financial difficulties as a student due to Covid-19?

Yes, I have really struggled financially (23)
13.61%
I have experienced some financial difficulties (48)
28.4%
I haven't experienced any financial difficulties and things have stayed the same (69)
40.83%
I have had better financial opportunities as a result of the pandemic (24)
14.2%
I've had another experience (let us know in the thread!) (5)
2.96%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise