YR 13 ONLY - Help! Mock exams

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Ali-liyyah
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hey guys! I hope you are well. I’m a bit stressed out as we have our major mock exams coming up in January and I want to revise effectively. I’m doing A Level Spanish, Psychology and English Literature.

I’m currently trying to make a detailed revision schedule from now until the exams, but I’m not really sure how to start it. Could anyone give me some advice please ? I’ve made a list of most of the things I want to do and revise, but I’m struggling with actually putting it into a timetable. Any advice?

Also, how would you guys say is the best way to revise after taking notes? I’m definitely going to try to do some practice papers and questions and also make essay plans to go in my notes. Does anyone have anything else that they find effective that they wouldn’t mind sharing?

Also, what do you guys like to do after studying? I just wanted to ask as I only really watch TV or browse Pinterest 😂. Does anyone have any recommendations of things they do to relax?

Sorry that was so long. I really want to make sure I get the best grades I can, especially because we don’t know whether we’ll eventually have our exams cancelled or not. Thanks in advance for all your help x
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Medusa.D
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#2
Report 1 year ago
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Ok, so first of all good luck and don't drain/ stress yourself too much! A* A* A AA (Biology, Sociology, Government & Politics, Fine Art AS, EPQ, predicted)
- I highly recommend sticking with essay plans. I use them for politics and sociology and it's the only way to do well because if you truly make an essay plan for almost every possible question then you're sorted for the exam. Points in your essay plan also link to other questions so keep on going over them.
- As for the timetable, personally I don't use them, I never follow them, my days are also very unpredictable due to covid so not being able to follow the timetable would make me feel like crap. I think if you're going to make one be very realistic. As an alternative, everyday after school I make myself a list of things I want to get done today and stuff I want to get done by the end of the week, so a short term and a long term list which is very useful. The list is super specific (for example, organise enzyme notes, complete the bio worksheet, make a mind map about party leaders) and doesn't restrict me with a time frame which is what a timetable does and it stresses me out like school uno, as long as I get the work done then everything is fine.
- Once I've taken notes from class I condense them using the Cornell note taking method, I recommend you a watch a 5 minute youtube video about it, it helps organise your notes and it's very convenient. Since you're in year 13 there is no point in rewriting your notes again that's a waste of time, so make sure that the notes you have now are condensed and use the Cornell method for future notes.
- Choose a topic and do something called blurting. Grab a piece of paper and write down everything you know from the topic, don't time yourself for this. This is a form of active recall which basically forces your brain to dump information. Once you think you're done compare your 'blurting' sheet to your actual, textbook/ class notes and using a coloured pen note down any information you missed onto your blurting sheet. Using flashcards write down the information you missed, once again making sure it's condensed, this means that you have rewritten the information you missed out on twice, which could your jog memory on the topic. Now you will have a pile of information that you struggle to remember. Do some practice questions just on the 'missing information' because that's the best form of revision. It also saves time and really highlights your weakest points. A couple of days later do the blurting method again with the same topic and see what information you remember this time. For example, I study bio and let's say there's a topic about gas exchange, I will note down everything I know and then use my actual notes and textbook to write down the missing info in a coloured pen. I only do practice questions on the missing information.
- I enjoy reading a lot so I read books to relax myself before I go to bed whilst listening to twilight soundtracks or anime music lmao. Sometimes I do extra reading for my subjects such as politics because I enjoy it..but 80% of the time I will be reading a fantasy book, probably Harry Potter. Warm drinks are good to keep you calm and warm whilst revising. Also painting my nails, I usually take it off the next day but it's nice.
I hope this made sense, I'm not the best at explaining but I hope you understand and once again good luck
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Ali-liyyah
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#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
Hey! This was so helpful, thank you!

I have a really long list of everything I need to do already, but I just wanted to organise it in a way that I would know what I’d be doing each day. Does anyone have any recommendations for a way I could do this apart from a timetable, or if you use a timetable , how do you organise it in an effective way?

Thanks so much again for your help x
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