Madman11
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#1
Hi, I’m gonna be applying next month and I’m really undecided between these 2 degrees. I’m hoping for an A* in Maths, and if that happens, I’ll have got A*AB (Maths,Chem,Bio) in my A Levels - I retook for my Maths. I just wanted to know which degree u guys would recommend. I don’t know much about Finance and Economics, and I think I’m already gonna be at a huge disadvantage for not doing Eco, whereas with Accounting and Finance, I know a lot more about it. The only problem is I feel E and F is a slightly better degree than A and F, which is probably the thing really making me overthink this lmao.
0
reply
Ferrari08
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 months ago
#2
Wow we’re in the exact same boat. I sat maths in autumn too and hoping for an a star. If that happens I’ll have a*ac, sitting the c in summer. I would suggest you sitting the b in summer and you could apply to ucl for pure econ or any of their econ related course cos they require an A* which you will have. So to answer your q do econ and finance mate.
0
reply
ajj2000
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 6 months ago
#3
Have you looked at this course:

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...course-profile

It might have some specific advantages for you.
0
reply
Madman11
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#4
(Original post by ajj2000)
Have you looked at this course:

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...course-profile

It might have some specific advantages for you.
Yes mate, I was actually a bit confused with that one. Does the Baecon mean it has more economics incorporated into the course than a usual a and f degree ? If so, it definitely seems the most suitable for me, considering I’ve done AS Economics too.
0
reply
ajj2000
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#5
Report 6 months ago
#5
(Original post by Madman11)
Yes mate, I was actually a bit confused with that one. Does the Baecon mean it has more economics incorporated into the course than a usual a and f degree ? If so, it definitely seems the most suitable for me, considering I’ve done AS Economics too.
Hi - I'll have a look through the course details to make sure I'm up to date and then respond properly. Basically its a broader course than most so you can switch options easily as you discover your interests and strengths. I particularly like the course for those who like humanities but want to study A+F as it gives them broader options. I don't think that's your situation (?) but there are good routes to move to a proper finance degree rather than A+F if that takes your interest.
0
reply
ajj2000
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 6 months ago
#6
(Original post by Madman11)
Yes mate, I was actually a bit confused with that one. Does the Baecon mean it has more economics incorporated into the course than a usual a and f degree ? If so, it definitely seems the most suitable for me, considering I’ve done AS Economics too.
Ok - some assorted observations.

- the course does have more economics that most Acc Fin type degrees.
- If you are careful with courses in the first year you can easily transfer to an economics degree of finance/ econ + fin

That looks very attractive to me as you get to see what you like and are good at in a university setting.

Another point of interest - I think if you chose options carefully you can pick up a number of exemptions for professional accountancy qualifications with both the economics and finance routes. Looks far better in that regard than most similar degrees if accountancy is a route that you might want to go down in the future.
1
reply
lbenson88
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report 6 months ago
#7
(Original post by ajj2000)
Have you looked at this course:

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u...course-profile

It might have some specific advantages for you.
I did this course!

Although I did the econ and finance option, of the BAEcon course you can pretty much pick which modules suit you. To major in 2 specialisms (in any of them) you need to pick 50 credits in modules related to that topic in the final year. so I did 50 credits in econ and 50 credits in finance (and 20 credits are free choice) if you only have 1 specialism (ie econ) you need to do 80 credits in the subject(possibly70 credits?) (and you have more free choice)

But the selection of courses is pretty big depending on which you want to do but you need to think about what you want to do in earlier years as you need to do the courses in 2nd year to get into the 3 year courses for a a lot of subjects.

Basically manchester offers a normal accounting and finance degree in the business school or the Econ (accounting and finance) which has more econ module options.
1
reply
Madman11
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#8
(Original post by lbenson88)
I did this course!

Although I did the econ and finance option, of the BAEcon course you can pretty much pick which modules suit you. To major in 2 specialisms (in any of them) you need to pick 50 credits in modules related to that topic in the final year. so I did 50 credits in econ and 50 credits in finance (and 20 credits are free choice) if you only have 1 specialism (ie econ) you need to do 80 credits in the subject(possibly70 credits?) (and you have more free choice)

But the selection of courses is pretty big depending on which you want to do but you need to think about what you want to do in earlier years as you need to do the courses in 2nd year to get into the 3 year courses for a a lot of subjects.

Basically manchester offers a normal accounting and finance degree in the business school or the Econ (accounting and finance) which has more econ module options.
How was the econ mate ? I only studied eco upto AS Level, so do you reckon it’s possible for someone like me to also specialise in eco as well as finance ? Also, by doing this do you lower the number of exemptions you get, as you’re not specialising in accountancy too ? If you don’t mind me asking, how many total exemptions for CIMA did you get, since you specialised in eco and finance ?
0
reply
lbenson88
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 6 months ago
#9
(Original post by Madman11)
How was the econ mate ? I only studied eco upto AS Level, so do you reckon it’s possible for someone like me to also specialise in eco as well as finance ? Also, by doing this do you lower the number of exemptions you get, as you’re not specialising in accountancy too ? If you don’t mind me asking, how many total exemptions for CIMA did you get, since you specialised in eco and finance ?
So you don’t need to have done econ previously, obviously it helps but they split you into groups depending on what previous econ people have done. (And even in the classes for people who’ve done it before they go over it again)

Your exemptions depend on what modules you pick, if you did the straight the accountancy degree course then yes you’re going to have more exemption options by the end. But as there’s a wide range of course options, you can pick courses that give you exemptions if you want to. (It’s easy to google which courses give exemptions on the cima website)

Personally though I didn’t worry about exemptions when I was choosing modules. I picked the courses I was interested in.

Even if you get loads of exemptions though there’s no guarantee your employer will let you use them. I’m doing the ACA and my employer doesn’t allow us to use exemptions for some of the units. We all have to do them again, regardless of whether you did them at uni or not.
0
reply
lbenson88
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#10
Report 6 months ago
#10
I should add though-

Yes doing accounting at uni will give you exemptions for accounting qualifications after uni.

BUT... I found the econ part of my degree more useful when job hunting after uni. I was actively getting targeted by recruiters looking for people with Econ degrees for jobs they were hiring for (for non econ jobs!) plus there were jobs that needed you to have a ‘maths’ component, they accepted econ for those jobs, they didn’t accept business courses (ie accounting)

For accounting jobs you can apply with any degree, but for loads of other jobs they really seemed to like the econ degree.

Just my personal experience.
Last edited by lbenson88; 6 months ago
0
reply
Madman11
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 6 months ago
#11
(Original post by lbenson88)
I should add though-

Yes doing accounting at uni will give you exemptions for accounting qualifications after uni.

BUT... I found the econ part of my degree more useful when job hunting after uni. I was actively getting targeted by recruiters looking for people with Econ degrees for jobs they were hiring for (for non econ jobs!) plus there were jobs that needed you to have a ‘maths’ component, they accepted econ for those jobs, they didn’t accept business courses (ie accounting)

For accounting jobs you can apply with any degree, but for loads of other jobs they really seemed to like the econ degree.

Just my personal experience.
Thanks a lot for the insight mate, really helpful
Just wondering, if you do go down ur route, what would ur end degree be ? 😂 As in would it still be an accounting and finance degree, or would it now become an economics and finance degree ?
0
reply
lbenson88
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#12
Report 6 months ago
#12
So my degree was an economics and finance degree. But it was also a bachelors of economics( as opposed to a BA or a BSc degree.) not that that bit made much difference.

Its possible to do the bachelor of economics course and do the accounting and finance option, which is different to the straight accounting degree. The first is done by the school of social sciences, accounting is done by the business school. But you can still do just the normal econ degree and pick up accounting modules as you have free choice options. Also the finance modules have multiple accounting options to pick from. So you can get exemptions that way.

It’s kind of weird to explain as there’s so many similar but slightly different options. But if you did the BAEcon (Hons) Accounting and Finance, you could tell people you did an accounting degree, or finance degree, or both, or an econ degree. Technically they’re all correct.

But most people who do the econ degree want to do econ more than accounting. It’s rare for someone to take the econ degree but not have it as the final year specialism (or half) most people do econ or econ plus another option (or else why do an econ course?)
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How are you feeling about starting university this autumn?

Really excited (63)
22.5%
Excited but a bit nervous (126)
45%
Not bothered either way (36)
12.86%
I'm really nervous (55)
19.64%

Watched Threads

View All