Eccentric Goatie
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I m not getting into much details, as it can bias your answer. I can then comment on your answers but for now I just generally ask how to know, from your experience (yourself or what you see in fellows), if you re the right man to become a doctor, if you should indeed, if you can and if you naturally reunite the skills (some people may want but not be made for medicine in terms of skills and preferences internally)?
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Letournel
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(Original post by Eccentric Goatie)
I m not getting into much details, as it can bias your answer. I can then comment on your answers but for now I just generally ask how to know, from your experience (yourself or what you see in fellows), if you re the right man to become a doctor, if you should indeed, if you can and if you naturally reunite the skills (some people may want but not be made for medicine in terms of skills and preferences internally)?
Might come as a bit of a shock but they let women in too....

I wasn't made to be anything, i chose to do it.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Letournel)
Might come as a bit of a shock but they let women in too....

I wasn't made to be anything, i chose to do it.
These were my first two reactions too.
(Original post by Eccentric Goatie)
I m not getting into much details, as it can bias your answer. I can then comment on your answers but for now I just generally ask how to know, from your experience (yourself or what you see in fellows), if you re the right man to become a doctor, if you should indeed, if you can and if you naturally reunite the skills (some people may want but not be made for medicine in terms of skills and preferences internally)?
Erm, I can only assume English isn't your first language! A lot of this makes grammatical sense, but it doesn't really make sense sense. 'Reunite the skills'? 'Preferences internally'?
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Bexjw
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(Original post by Letournel)
Might come as a bit of a shock but they let women in too....

I wasn't made to be anything, i chose to do it.
Agreed!

A lot of hard work, work experience - academics and extracurricular and persistence come to mind (GEM).
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shak101
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Ask your parents what profession they had in mind for you when they were trying to conceive.
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Democracy
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OP's profile suggests English isn't his first language.

"some people may want but not be made for medicine in terms of skills and preferences internally"

Yes, it's important to be realistic.

I think a lot of the tropes and myths about medicine can be dispelled by work experience, reading, and asking on fora like TSR. You then need to do a bit of honest self-reflection and ask yourself if what you've seen and read suits your personality and interests.

After that, it's a risk like any other endeavour. You might be completely wrong in which case you can switch and do something else. It's not the end of the world. I'm sure Michael Rosen has made a far more significant impact on the world as a children's author than if he'd stuck to medicine.
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Eccentric Goatie
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(Original post by Letournel)
Might come as a bit of a shock but they let women in too....

I wasn't made to be anything, i chose to do it.
I never implied it was men-exclusive, I asked as a man as I could ve said “guy” instead of man... word man or guy has generally an extensive conception.

“Made to be” was also an expression that was adequate for the question as I was asking for criteria that made people in med schools decide they had the skills to thrive in such course.
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Eccentric Goatie
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(Original post by shak101)
Ask your parents what profession they had in mind for you when they were trying to conceive.
They d probably say Superman but I prefer to be Batman
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asif007
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There's no way of knowing if you're "made for" something but I think there are pre-requisites that everyone who wants to study Medicine must have. Such as interest in studying the human body, enjoyment of working with/helping people, approachable personality, good work ethic etc. Regardless if it's Medicine or not, any career you end up pursuing will need time, effort and hard work, not just the belief that you're made to be there.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Eccentric Goatie)
... extensive conception.
Yeah its probably that.
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Ramipril
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It sounded like an interesting career, I did work experience, I got into medical school. I worked in healthcare before so I'm not going to say it was just 'to help people and save lives' because there are plenty of career paths which allow this. But being a doctor specifically is the type of vocation I'd want to do for the rest of my life, offers plenty of flexibility, and is a stable career choice. In my eyes what I think I'll get out of it makes up for what the hardships are/will be. I'm not the kind of person who could do the same old 9-5 sit-down office job for the next 40 years and just be happy with that.
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becausethenight
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(Original post by Eccentric Goatie)
I m not getting into much details, as it can bias your answer. I can then comment on your answers but for now I just generally ask how to know, from your experience (yourself or what you see in fellows), if you re the right man to become a doctor, if you should indeed, if you can and if you naturally reunite the skills (some people may want but not be made for medicine in terms of skills and preferences internally)?
It's vocational but I definitely chose to do it.

A lot of the qualities of a "good doctor" can mostly be learnt - no one is born knowing how to learn loads of information, how to tell someone they're dying, or how to stay cheerful and calm ten hours into a shift!

When I started volunteering, I wasn't as good at talking to patients, I made mistakes, I struggled with the self-confidence needed to treat someone/teach them etc. I really wanted to improve, so I put the work in and went out of my comfort zone. The question is really "are you the type of person who cares enough about this to learn the skills, do the exams, go through interviews, go through med school...", I think, and that's going to come from some deep and complex layer of your subconscious probably Obviously some people might work really hard and not get anywhere or not improve, but I'd cautiously suggest that's the minority and most people would eventually get into med school or manage to develop the skills needed?
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tinygirl96
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This is too good a question not to answer. Food for thought for sure. A top notch sense of teamwork is a must. Also good communication skills and the amazing ability to not crack under pressure is required. You must be very resourceful and kind and smart. Consider if you have what it takes before applying. Part of working in medicine involves teamwork and excellent report writing and reading skills too. Hone up your skills first before looking at positions. Do not apply if you lack any of those attributes in question and growth mindset. A sense of honour is needed. Empathy is definitely required along with common sense and a dry sense of humour. A positive outlook is wanted.
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Letournel
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(Original post by tinygirl96)
This is too good a question not to answer. Food for thought for sure. A top notch sense of teamwork is a must. Also good communication skills and the amazing ability to not crack under pressure is required. You must be very resourceful and kind and smart. Consider if you have what it takes before applying. Part of working in medicine involves teamwork and excellent report writing and reading skills too. Hone up your skills first before looking at positions. Do not apply if you lack any of those attributes in question and growth mindset. A sense of honour is needed. Empathy is definitely required along with common sense and a dry sense of humour. A positive outlook is wanted.
Do you believe that none of the above skills can be taught and if so how would you screen for them specifically?

Also why report writing? Outside of academic interests i can't think of the last time i've had to write a report from a clinical view point outside of a couple of police statements (which are very prescribed).
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tinygirl96
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No they can be taught. However some people are too stupid. And medicine involves a lot of paperwork. ETA teamwork games and exercises. In tray exercises and tasks. Assignments etc. Oral communication skill evaluation as well. Another way to assess skills is to have the candidate complete a role play situation.
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Letournel
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(Original post by tinygirl96)
No they can be taught. However some people are too stupid. And medicine involves a lot of paperwork. ETA teamwork games and exercises. In tray exercises and tasks. Assignments etc. Oral communication skill evaluation as well. Another way to assess skills is to have the candidate complete a role play situation.
So they can be taught but based on your criteria if you don't already have them you shouldn't apply?

Medicine does contain a lot of paperwork yes, but that's very different to report writing. Again the structure of how to write in the notes is learnt on the job.
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tinygirl96
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Nah
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username5311976
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(Original post by Letournel)
So they can be taught but based on your criteria if you don't already have them you shouldn't apply?

Medicine does contain a lot of paperwork yes, but that's very different to report writing. Again the structure of how to write in the notes is learnt on the job.
No, I disagree with the way tinygirl96 has approached this. All the attributes they listed above are ones which can be developed as you go along, meaning it can be taught, through clinical rotations for example. So long as you enter the course of medicine with a growth-mindset and genuinely want to be a doctor for good reasons I say you should definitely apply. If you want to study medicine, good luck and don’t let anything hold you back !
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Letournel
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(Original post by Nealandmichael)
No, I disagree with the way tinygirl96 has approached this. All the attributes they listed above are ones which can be developed as you go along, meaning it can be taught, through clinical rotations for example. So long as you enter the course of medicine with a growth-mindset and genuinely want to be a doctor for good reasons I say you should definitely apply. If you want to study medicine, good luck and don’t let anything hold you back !
I'm mostly playing devils advocate though it seems they have disengaged. I do disagree with that part of their statement though and similarly know plenty of doctors who don't possess all of the listed qualities and are effective in their roles.
Med school has been and gone for me, i graduated four and a half years ago.
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