quickquestion805
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I asked this question recently but it got taken down for some reason. I want to apply to cs this year at ucl, kcl, etc. The thing is, I have little coding experience, cs related work exp and have attended no cs related events. Besides reading, I have almost nothing relevant to cs to write in my ps. Someone suggested I watch some cs lectures online, which I plan on doing soon, but would this be enough? would this put me at a disadvantage amongst other applicants? should I consider another degree? anyone else in a similar situation?
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abbieb04
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(Original post by userx805)
I asked this question recently but it got taken down for some reason. I want to apply to cs this year at ucl, kcl, etc. The thing is, I have little coding experience, cs related work exp and have attended no cs related events. Besides reading, I have almost nothing relevant to cs to write in my ps. Someone suggested I watch some cs lectures online, which I plan on doing soon, but would this be enough? would this put me at a disadvantage amongst other applicants? should I consider another degree? anyone else in a similar situation?
hi! i dont know much about computer science so i cant help with specific suggestions but thought i would comment anyway. I think that if you know that computer science is definitely what you want to do then you should stick with it, if you genuinely have a passion for the subject admissions tutors will see this regardless of the amount of experience you have. I don't think that you would be at a disadvantage having not done work experience (especially this year) as long as you have read around the subject as much as possible and attended online events etc. I would suggest googling something along the lines of "ucl computer science events" and it should lead you to a page with links to online events or links to recordings of past events and seminars. this works for pretty much any university. i think with personal statements it should be less about the amount of things you've done and more about how a few of the things you have done have lead you to want to pursue the subject further. hope this helps
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quickquestion805
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(Original post by abbieb04)
hi! i dont know much about computer science so i cant help with specific suggestions but thought i would comment anyway. I think that if you know that computer science is definitely what you want to do then you should stick with it, if you genuinely have a passion for the subject admissions tutors will see this regardless of the amount of experience you have. I don't think that you would be at a disadvantage having not done work experience (especially this year) as long as you have read around the subject as much as possible and attended online events etc. I would suggest googling something along the lines of "ucl computer science events" and it should lead you to a page with links to online events or links to recordings of past events and seminars. this works for pretty much any university. i think with personal statements it should be less about the amount of things you've done and more about how a few of the things you have done have lead you to want to pursue the subject further. hope this helps
I see, thank you very much for your help
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𝖙𝖍𝖗𝖔𝖜𝖆𝖜𝖆𝖞696969
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Hey man, I think if you are dedicated enough, you can pump out a few decent projects in the next couple of weeks (assuming ur applying on the 15th of January).

I highly suggest you implement some CS projects into your PS. For example you could do an A* pathfinding algorithm project or some web applications, working with external APIs etc..

The projects itself doesnt need to be extremely efficient it just needs to showcase ur passion and skills in the field

That's just my opinion tho,
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quickquestion805
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(Original post by 𝖙𝖍𝖗𝖔𝖜𝖆𝖜𝖆 𝖞696969)
Hey man, I think if you are dedicated enough, you can pump out a few decent projects in the next couple of weeks (assuming ur applying on the 15th of January).

I highly suggest you implement some CS projects into your PS. For example you could do an A* pathfinding algorithm project or some web applications, working with external APIs etc..

The projects itself doesnt need to be extremely efficient it just needs to showcase ur passion and skills in the field

That's just my opinion tho,
Thank you for your response, that sounds like a great idea. The only problem is I have very little coding experience, so I have no clue where to begin. I also don't attend a school (I'm self teaching), so it would be pretty difficult to find any help, which would be necessary given I'm a complete beginner. Learning a new programming language and producing anything beyond very basic, while also self teaching a levels would be pretty difficult I think. What do you think? Is it doable?
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𝖙𝖍𝖗𝖔𝖜𝖆𝖜𝖆𝖞696969
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100% If you spend a few hours every day learning Python, probably by mid december if you are dedicated enough you will be able to produce some impressive projects, dont be afraid to use Youtube and Stack Overflow to copy chunks of code, try learn from the code and understand the process.
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quickquestion805
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(Original post by 𝖙𝖍𝖗𝖔𝖜𝖆𝖜𝖆 𝖞696969)
100% If you spend a few hours every day learning Python, probably by mid december if you are dedicated enough you will be able to produce some impressive projects, dont be afraid to use Youtube and Stack Overflow to copy chunks of code, try learn from the code and understand the process.
I'll give it a shot. Thank you very much for the advice
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chill pill
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Hi, where are you thinking of applying to
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quickquestion805
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(Original post by chill pill)
Hi, where are you thinking of applying to
I'm considering ucl, kcl, warwick
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BlueEyedGirl_
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Might be worth looking up MOOCs/online courses - they’re a good way to learn more about your subject in quite a structured way. I did a couple of MOOCs on Future Learn so have a look on there to see if there’s anything relevant, or just google online courses and see what comes up!
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louisisntmafia
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i agree with the above suggestions about learning to code, and python is a great place to start as it is quite accessible. from experience in computer science GCSE it isn't too hard once you grasp the basics to produce useful code! think about what emerging topics in computer science you are interested in learning about at university and mention these. cs normally doesn't ask for cs a level because they dont expect you to come with computing knowledge, more the mindset and building blocks (such as algorithmic thinking) required to learn it. reflect on all your experiences in the last couple years and see how you can link these to your interest to study cs.
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quickquestion805
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(Original post by BlueEyedGirl_)
Might be worth looking up MOOCs/online courses - they’re a good way to learn more about your subject in quite a structured way. I did a couple of MOOCs on Future Learn so have a look on there to see if there’s anything relevant, or just google online courses and see what comes up!
That's a good idea, I'll check it out. Thank you very much.
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quickquestion805
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(Original post by louisisntmafia)
i agree with the above suggestions about learning to code, and python is a great place to start as it is quite accessible. from experience in computer science GCSE it isn't too hard once you grasp the basics to produce useful code! think about what emerging topics in computer science you are interested in learning about at university and mention these. cs normally doesn't ask for cs a level because they dont expect you to come with computing knowledge, more the mindset and building blocks (such as algorithmic thinking) required to learn it. reflect on all your experiences in the last couple years and see how you can link these to your interest to study cs.
I see, that makes sense. Thanks for your help
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