Nubling_Lottie
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Hi all. I was wondering if what others think on this topic.

So I applied for a bachelor in child nursing at 5 unis. Had three interviews and got two more this week. One uni has given me a unconditional, another I'm waiting on a reply, and the third offered me a place of the Masters pre reg as I am currently studying my Ba(Hons) in Childhood Studies (at a 2:1 level).

The reason I applied for the bachelors was, in my understanding, I was required to have clinical hours, but this uni said my community and education experiences with children (and a unrelated part time job) was enough work experience with my course.

From my understanding, I'm entitled to full SFE funding on either degree as it's a exemption course (I asked them). I also believe from my research, there is little benefit (other than qualifying faster and a year loans less debt) to doing it as a master pre reg, and it will probably be a similar amount of work cramped into less time. This concerns me as I have some health issues, that while treated, may suffer if I'm overly stressed.

The flip side is, the uni said they feel I'd probably be bored due to lack of intellectual stimulation as the content would be easier in the bachelor. I can see their point, but it's a different subject so I'd still be learning new content, researching and practicing in a career field I love which would be probably be very stimulating

Anyone got a opinion or advice for this? Especially if you have had similar choice/experience, or took the PGdiploma or Master pre reg. I feel a little confused cos a part of me feels it would be more beneficial to consolidate and really master my skills in the bachelors, and another part is tempted by the faster way to qualify.
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Emily_B
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(Original post by Nubling_Lottie)
The reason I applied for the bachelors was, in my understanding, I was required to have clinical hours, but this uni said my community and education experiences with children (and a unrelated part time job) was enough work experience with my course.
This is sometimes the case - universities have ways of classing some work as part of the 2300 hours clinical experience required, and ways of making this up will be written into course details somewhere and approved by the NMC.

(Original post by Nubling_Lottie)
From my understanding, I'm entitled to full SFE funding on either degree as it's a exemption course (I asked them).
Yep... you'll probably never pay it all back and it'll just feel like an extra little bit of tax every month.

(Original post by Nubling_Lottie)
I also believe from my research, there is little benefit (other than qualifying faster and a year loans less debt) to doing it as a master pre reg, and it will probably be a similar amount of work cramped into less time. This concerns me as I have some health issues, that while treated, may suffer if I'm overly stressed.

The flip side is, the uni said they feel I'd probably be bored due to lack of intellectual stimulation as the content would be easier in the bachelor. I can see their point, but it's a different subject so I'd still be learning new content, researching and practicing in a career field I love which would be probably be very stimulating
Masters is also level 7 work not level 6. You'll get paid bottom of band 5 when you qualify regardless of whether you did bachelor or master course.
I did a BA(hons) German & History, got a 2:1, spent 2.5 years working as a HCA, went back to do my BN adult nursing and am so glad I did bachelor standard - 1st year theory I found reasonably easy, I really didn't get the point of one of the 3rd year modules, didn't have to worry about masters standard theory side, and was still learning.

What you've said suggests that you're not overly convinced by the masters. I appreciate that my response probably sounds more positive towards bachelors - but it's your decision. It depends on whether you feel ready to do a masters. If you do, go for it and do the masters in nursing. If not... don't worry. Do the BSc/BN and do a masters in something nursing related later in your career if you want to.
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moosec
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As you’ve said, there’s little benefit to doing a masters over a bachelors other than time - all newly qualified nurses start at the same point in the pay band etc regardless of what degree level they’ve achieved.

Also, I’m not sure about content being easier in the bachelor route. You need to meet the NMC’s educational requirements in both courses, meaning the content is very very similar, if not the same. The only difference is that on the bachelors it’s slightly more digestible as there’s an extra year to fit it all in & more time for placements.
I chose a bachelor over a masters for these reasons (I also have another degree prior to Nursing). But with that being said, if your uni is willing to accept your current experience as Recognition of Prior Learning, that’s good! It’s an option worth considering! It’s entirely dependent on what you’d prefer - either route you’ll learn the same competencies
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Nubling_Lottie
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(Original post by Emily_B)
This is sometimes the case - universities have ways of classing some work as part of the 2300 hours clinical experience required, and ways of making this up will be written into course details somewhere and approved by the NMC.



Yep... you'll probably never pay it all back and it'll just feel like an extra little bit of tax every month.



Masters is also level 7 work not level 6. You'll get paid bottom of band 5 when you qualify regardless of whether you did bachelor or master course.
I did a BA(hons) German & History, got a 2:1, spent 2.5 years working as a HCA, went back to do my BN adult nursing and am so glad I did bachelor standard - 1st year theory I found reasonably easy, I really didn't get the point of one of the 3rd year modules, didn't have to worry about masters standard theory side, and was still learning.

What you've said suggests that you're not overly convinced by the masters. I appreciate that my response probably sounds more positive towards bachelors - but it's your decision. It depends on whether you feel ready to do a masters. If you do, go for it and do the masters in nursing. If not... don't worry. Do the BSc/BN and do a masters in something nursing related later in your career if you want to.
Thank you for your response.

This was what I thinking of, that perhaps the bachelor is more useful even though I am pretty sure I want a masters in the future. I personally think a masters that i do post qualification and is more specific to the field I work in would a lot more valuable in terms of employment

A small part of like the idea of the masters, but I think the course makes more sense as a bachelor, since it already meant to be a content heavy course anyways.

Can I just confirm since you did your degree as a second bachelors, did you receive maintanence loans or just tuition? From what I have been told be SFE, it's both but, people online seem to debate this a lot and it would be nice to know from someone who's been in this position before
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Nubling_Lottie
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(Original post by moosec)
As you’ve said, there’s little benefit to doing a masters over a bachelors other than time - all newly qualified nurses start at the same point in the pay band etc regardless of what degree level they’ve achieved.

Also, I’m not sure about content being easier in the bachelor route. You need to meet the NMC’s educational requirements in both courses, meaning the content is very very similar, if not the same. The only difference is that on the bachelors it’s slightly more digestible as there’s an extra year to fit it all in & more time for placements.
I chose a bachelor over a masters for these reasons (I also have another degree prior to Nursing). But with that being said, if your uni is willing to accept your current experience as Recognition of Prior Learning, that’s good! It’s an option worth considering! It’s entirely dependent on what you’d prefer - either route you’ll learn the same competencies
Thank you for your response

I wasn't sure when they said it was easy as a bachelor. Yes year 1 of a masters is level 6 and year 2 is a level 7, but the content has to be similar to be creditated as a nurse surely. I feel like it will just be a matter of more academic skills/writing emphasis over the actual professional and clinical skills of a nurse - I know as a employer, I'd prefer the practice skills over a academic grade

The main factor for me, as someone with a existing heart issue (medicated, don't worry I'm healthy enough to train) is that if I was having my placements squashed in during a masters, I'd be more likely to get overtired when is when I get flare ups with my health. I think atm, I'm airing more to the bachelors for the reasons above but I felt very flattered and happy to receive the offer of a masters either way, so I thought I should research and ask for others opinions
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Emily_B
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(Original post by Nubling_Lottie)
Thank you for your response.

This was what I thinking of, that perhaps the bachelor is more useful even though I am pretty sure I want a masters in the future. I personally think a masters that i do post qualification and is more specific to the field I work in would a lot more valuable in terms of employment

A small part of like the idea of the masters, but I think the course makes more sense as a bachelor, since it already meant to be a content heavy course anyways.

Can I just confirm since you did your degree as a second bachelors, did you receive maintanence loans or just tuition? From what I have been told be SFE, it's both but, people online seem to debate this a lot and it would be nice to know from someone who's been in this position before
(Original post by Nubling_Lottie)
Thank you for your response

I wasn't sure when they said it was easy as a bachelor. Yes year 1 of a masters is level 6 and year 2 is a level 7, but the content has to be similar to be creditated as a nurse surely. I feel like it will just be a matter of more academic skills/writing emphasis over the actual professional and clinical skills of a nurse - I know as a employer, I'd prefer the practice skills over a academic grade

The main factor for me, as someone with a existing heart issue (medicated, don't worry I'm healthy enough to train) is that if I was having my placements squashed in during a masters, I'd be more likely to get overtired when is when I get flare ups with my health. I think atm, I'm airing more to the bachelors for the reasons above but I felt very flattered and happy to receive the offer of a masters either way, so I thought I should research and ask for others opinions
At job interview, I wasn't asked about my (predicted) degree grade. My husband a nd brother in law are also both nurses and, in the various jobs they've both done, neither has ever been asked about their degree grade. All employers have been after from the 3 of us have been a copy of degree certificate to prove we've got the qualification and proof of NMC registration.

I think that nowadays you get both loans regardless. Not entirely sure. I was fully financed by the "old" bursary scheme so didn't have to worry about any of that - although could get a small amount of maintenance loan if I wanted to apply (but didn't) so that's probably where the confusion is.
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Nubling_Lottie
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That's what I believed would be likely, since there's regulations meaning all nurses must met certain skills. The only real edge, I imagine is if applying for further postgrad study later.

(Original post by Emily_B)
At job interview, I wasn't asked about my (predicted) degree grade. My husband a nd brother in law are also both nurses and, in the various jobs they've both done, neither has ever been asked about their degree grade. All employers have been after from the 3 of us have been a copy of degree certificate to prove we've got the qualification and proof of NMC registration.

I think that nowadays you get both loans regardless. Not entirely sure. I was fully financed by the "old" bursary scheme so didn't have to worry about any of that - although could get a small amount of maintenance loan if I wanted to apply (but didn't) so that's probably where the confusion is.
Oh okay thank you for answering regardless I'm like 99% sure I am entitled to maintenance, but I guess I'll just see. I have some savings to support me if not yeah I had seen some people arguing over the change of bursary to SFE funding and the nhs grant, so it's prob very confusing for most people not employed by unis or SFE with the exact regulations available to them
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