What is the employability like for people with bachelors in each of the 3 sciences?

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MindMax2000
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I was watching a video based on getting bachelors degrees and getting work in the US.

Apparently, you cannot get a lot of jobs with just a bachelor's in Biology, since there is limited application unless you go into postgrad.
Although Chemistry is a more favoured subject, there aren't that many jobs for Chemists. You might get something in oil refinery, but not a lot. This information kind of made me wonder about it.
You get the most career prospects with Physics, but the jobs aren't really there for Physicists. Most of the work is in computer programming or the financial sector. In the US, the prospects of getting work as engineers with a Physics degree is also limited.
The most in demand STEM degree would be engineering, but in one of the 4 or 5 branches: civil, mechanical, electrical, computer, and possibly chemical. The other branches are not as popular or can be substituted with one of the 5 (usually mechanical).

How does the above compare for the UK or other countries in Europe?
From what I know, the UK is a bit more lenient with people going into engineering with Physic degrees, considering the demand for the job.
I haven't seen that much promotion for Chemists. Is there a reason why this is the case? I'd thought Chemists would be popular considering how widespread the use of chemistry is in our lives as well as in important work like in pharmaceuticals, cleaning products, and healthcare.

If you have a science degree and work in a STEM related field in either Europe of the UK, can I have your thoughts on this?
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Student-95
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It's not too different. Engineering will open more doors but I wouldn't recommend studying it unless you actually want to go into engineering. With each subject you listed, most graduates don't get jobs in the field they studied because there is a large oversupply of graduates.
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Student-95)
It's not too different. Engineering will open more doors but I wouldn't recommend studying it unless you actually want to go into engineering. With each subject you listed, most graduates don't get jobs in the field they studied because there is a large oversupply of graduates.
Thanks for replying.

Do you have any thoughts on doing engineering or physics for research in engineering or physics? I'm currently considering going into research in physical sciences or engineering.

When I spoke to my tutor about the choice, he essentially said that physical scientists are essentially engineers in practice, so there isn't much difference between them for research purposes. However, when I came on TSR, most of the comments specify that there is a clear distinction, and you can't go into the other discipline for research.
Considering a lot of unis allow people studying physical sciences to go into engineering, and vice versa, I was wondering how strong the differences are and whether they are really that material.
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