Unknownx444
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The Woman in Black
Can someone help write question 4 with this extract😭 (20 marks)

Focus this part of your answer on the second part of the source, from line 14 to the end.
A student, having read this section of the text, said: “This part of the text, where Arthur Kipps searches for the source of the noise, shows how nervous he feels being in the house all alone. I felt anxious about what might happen to him.”

To what extent do you agree? In your response, you could:

● Consider your own impressions of Arthur Kipps’ situation
● Evaluate how the writer creates a sense of mystery and tension
● Support your opinions with quotations from the text

(Insert)
At first, all seemed very quiet, very still, and I wondered why I had awoken. Then, with a missed heart-beat, I realized that Spider was up and standing at the door. Every hair of her body was on end, her ears were pricked, her tail erect, the whole of her tense, as if ready to spring. And she was emitting a soft, low growl from deep in her throat. I sat up paralysed, frozen, in the bed, conscious only of the dog and of the prickling of my own skin and of what suddenly seemed a different kind of silence, ominous and dreadful. And then, from somewhere within the depths of the house—but somewhere not very far from the room in which I was—I heard a noise. It was a faint noise, and, strain my ears as I might, I could not make out exactly what it was. It was a sound like a regular yet intermittent bump or rumble. Nothing else happened. There were no footsteps, no creaking floorboards, the air was absolutely still, the wind did not moan through the casement. Only the muffled noise went on and the dog continued to stand, bristling at the door, now putting her nose to the gap at the bottom and snuffling along, now taking a pace backwards, head cocked and, like me, listening, listening. And, every so often, she growled again.
In the end, I suppose because nothing else happened and because I did have the dog to take with me, I managed to get out of bed, though I was shaken and my heart beat uncomfortably fast within me. But it took some time for me to find sufficient reserves of courage to enable me to open the bedroom door and stand out in the dark corridor. The moment I did so, Spider shot ahead and I heard her padding about, sniffing intently at every closed door, still growling and grumbling down in her throat.
After a while, I heard the odd sound again. It seemed to be coming from along the passage to my left, at the very far end. But it was still quite impossible to identify. Very cautiously, listening, hardly breathing, I ventured a few steps in that direction. Spider went ahead of me, the passage led only to three other bedrooms on either side and, one by one, regaining my nerve as I went, I opened them and looked inside each one. Nothing, only heavy old furniture and empty unmade beds and, in the rooms at the back of the house, moonlight. Down below me on the ground floor of the house, silence, a seething, blanketing, almost tangible silence, and a musty darkness, thick as felt.
And then I reached the door at the very end of the passage. Spider was there before me and her body, as she sniffed beneath it, went rigid, her growling grew louder. I put my hand on her collar, stroked the rough, short hair, as much for my own reassurance as for hers. I could feel the tension in her limbs and body and it answered to my own.
2

This was the door without a keyhole, which I had been unable to open on my first visit to Eel Marsh House. I had no idea what was beyond it. Except the sound. It was coming from within that room, not very loud but just to hand, on the other side of that single wooden partition. It was a sound of something bumping gently on the floor, in a rhythmic sort of way, a familiar sound and yet one I still could not exactly place, a sound that seemed to belong to my past, to waken old, half- forgotten memories and associations deep within me, a sound that, in any other place, would not have made me afraid but would, I thought, have been curiously comforting, friendly.
But at my feet, the dog Spider began to whine, a thin, pitiful, frightened moan, and to back away from the door a little and press against my legs. My throat felt constricted and dry and I had begun to shiver. There was something in that room and I could not get to it, nor would I dare to, if I were able. I told myself it was a rat or a trapped bird, fallen down the chimney into the hearth and unable to get out again. But the sound was not that of some small, panic-stricken creature. Bump bump. Pause. Bump bump. Pause. Bump bump. Bump bump. Bump bump.
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tinygirl96
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This is what you need to do. Go over the text and highlight any quotes.
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Samira Miah
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(Original post by Unknownx444)
The Woman in Black
Can someone help write question 4 with this extract😭 (20 marks)

Focus this part of your answer on the second part of the source, from line 14 to the end.
A student, having read this section of the text, said: “This part of the text, where Arthur Kipps searches for the source of the noise, shows how nervous he feels being in the house all alone. I felt anxious about what might happen to him.”

To what extent do you agree? In your response, you could:

● Consider your own impressions of Arthur Kipps’ situation
● Evaluate how the writer creates a sense of mystery and tension
● Support your opinions with quotations from the text

(Insert)
At first, all seemed very quiet, very still, and I wondered why I had awoken. Then, with a missed heart-beat, I realized that Spider was up and standing at the door. Every hair of her body was on end, her ears were pricked, her tail erect, the whole of her tense, as if ready to spring. And she was emitting a soft, low growl from deep in her throat. I sat up paralysed, frozen, in the bed, conscious only of the dog and of the prickling of my own skin and of what suddenly seemed a different kind of silence, ominous and dreadful. And then, from somewhere within the depths of the house—but somewhere not very far from the room in which I was—I heard a noise. It was a faint noise, and, strain my ears as I might, I could not make out exactly what it was. It was a sound like a regular yet intermittent bump or rumble. Nothing else happened. There were no footsteps, no creaking floorboards, the air was absolutely still, the wind did not moan through the casement. Only the muffled noise went on and the dog continued to stand, bristling at the door, now putting her nose to the gap at the bottom and snuffling along, now taking a pace backwards, head cocked and, like me, listening, listening. And, every so often, she growled again.
In the end, I suppose because nothing else happened and because I did have the dog to take with me, I managed to get out of bed, though I was shaken and my heart beat uncomfortably fast within me. But it took some time for me to find sufficient reserves of courage to enable me to open the bedroom door and stand out in the dark corridor. The moment I did so, Spider shot ahead and I heard her padding about, sniffing intently at every closed door, still growling and grumbling down in her throat.
After a while, I heard the odd sound again. It seemed to be coming from along the passage to my left, at the very far end. But it was still quite impossible to identify. Very cautiously, listening, hardly breathing, I ventured a few steps in that direction. Spider went ahead of me, the passage led only to three other bedrooms on either side and, one by one, regaining my nerve as I went, I opened them and looked inside each one. Nothing, only heavy old furniture and empty unmade beds and, in the rooms at the back of the house, moonlight. Down below me on the ground floor of the house, silence, a seething, blanketing, almost tangible silence, and a musty darkness, thick as felt.
And then I reached the door at the very end of the passage. Spider was there before me and her body, as she sniffed beneath it, went rigid, her growling grew louder. I put my hand on her collar, stroked the rough, short hair, as much for my own reassurance as for hers. I could feel the tension in her limbs and body and it answered to my own.
2

This was the door without a keyhole, which I had been unable to open on my first visit to Eel Marsh House. I had no idea what was beyond it. Except the sound. It was coming from within that room, not very loud but just to hand, on the other side of that single wooden partition. It was a sound of something bumping gently on the floor, in a rhythmic sort of way, a familiar sound and yet one I still could not exactly place, a sound that seemed to belong to my past, to waken old, half- forgotten memories and associations deep within me, a sound that, in any other place, would not have made me afraid but would, I thought, have been curiously comforting, friendly.
But at my feet, the dog Spider began to whine, a thin, pitiful, frightened moan, and to back away from the door a little and press against my legs. My throat felt constricted and dry and I had begun to shiver. There was something in that room and I could not get to it, nor would I dare to, if I were able. I told myself it was a rat or a trapped bird, fallen down the chimney into the hearth and unable to get out again. But the sound was not that of some small, panic-stricken creature. Bump bump. Pause. Bump bump. Pause. Bump bump. Bump bump. Bump bump.
Where is line 14 lol?

Update: Never mind, it's from 'After a while,...' isn't it?

Update: I agree that in this part of the text that where Arthur Kipps searches for the source of the noise shows how nervous he feels all around the house all alone as the writer says he continuously is 'regaining [his] nerve' which shows how out of control he feels within his own home, and that the atmosphere feels more different around him when he is alone. The fact he is repetitively regaining it 'as [he] went' shows that his moments of being brave quickly withers away with every step he takes amplifying the nervousness while he 'ventures' around his home searching for the noise.

Naturally the writer creates a very mysterious atmosphere as he describes the silence with premodifiers such as 'seething, blanketing, almost tangible' personifying the silence as some mythological and supernatural creature capable of juxtaposing the whole concept of silence by stating that even silence can make a noise. In addition to this, the fact that the protagonist claims he can hear a noise shows a sense of paranoia which fully supports the statement that Arthur Kipps feels the nerve when he wanders the house alone. It is also exemplified when the writer uses onomatopoeia- 'Bump bump. Pause...'- to create that effect of tension within the extract and make the readers feel the anxiety that Arthur is facing too.

My brain needs a little rest now! xD Hope this helps! (P.S let me know what grades you get, I'd be quite interested to see how it went).
Last edited by Samira Miah; 1 month ago
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Unknownx444
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Report Thread starter 1 month ago
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(Original post by samira miah)
where is line 14 lol?

Update: Never mind, it's from 'after a while,...' isn't it?

Update: I agree that in this part of the text that where arthur kipps searches for the source of the noise shows how nervous he feels all around the house all alone as the writer says he continuously is 'regaining [his] nerve' which shows how out of control he feels within his own home, and that the atmosphere feels more different around him when he is alone. The fact he is repetitively regaining it 'as [he] went' shows that his moments of being brave quickly withers away with every step he takes amplifying the nervousness while he 'ventures' around his home searching for the noise.

Naturally the writer creates a very mysterious atmosphere as he describes the silence with premodifiers such as 'seething, blanketing, almost tangible' personifying the silence as some mythological and supernatural creature capable of juxtaposing the whole concept of silence by stating that even silence can make a noise. In addition to this, the fact that the protagonist claims he can hear a noise shows a sense of paranoia which fully supports the statement that arthur kipps feels the nerve when he wanders the house alone. It is also exemplified when the writer uses onomatopoeia- 'bump bump. Pause...'- to create that effect of tension within the extract and make the readers feel the anxiety that arthur is facing too.

My brain needs a little rest now! Xd hope this helps! (p.s let me know what grades you get, i'd be quite interested to see how it went).
omggggg ur actually a lifesaver i love you smmm thankyouu again!!😭😭❤️
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