seam88
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I am in year 13 applying to uni for 2022 entry after a gap year.

I was originally looking to apply for medicine, but decided nursing would be a better option as there would be less academic stress.

Is there any post graduates who could tell me a bit about their degree?

I am hoping to also do masters to get to more senior roles and learn a little about the medicine behind nursing, without doing a full medicine degree.

Would you suggest there are options to this with a Nursing degree? Also, which unis would you recommend are best for this? I was looking at Exeter and Cardiff so let me know your thoughts
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Emily_B
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Ultimately, you need an NMC registration to practice as a nurse. The "best" uni to study nursing is any one which offers an NMC accredited course - there's no other way of ending up registered, and when it comes to work places are only worried about whether you passed your nursing degree and are registered.
You need to figure out 1) which course appeals to you 2) where do you see yourself studying 3) how far from home do you want to be studying AND on placement for most of the year? (just bear in mind that student nurses don't get anywhere near as many holidays as other students).
I would also suggest you look at nursing related masters courses as well - although you won't know which direction you really want to end up going down until after qualifying.

As a student nurse, things I studied included:
- A&P. This was nowhere near in the same depth as medical school. these modules also included pharmacology
- holistic care
- multidisciplinary team working
- public health

Placements I had included:
- school immunisations. All about childhood immunisations. Mostly watching groups of children and teenagers getting their immunisations.
- Elderly medicine. Lots of basic personal care. How do you deal with someone from a nursing/residential home with dementia AND a UTI? How do you stop their skin breaking down because they can't mobilise and are doubly incontinent (and YOU have to keep cleaning them up)?
- Day surgery. Got to go to theatre to watch operations a few times, but mostly admitting patients, observing them post op, and then discharging.
- Coronary Care Unit. Personal care, observations, and watching monitors.
- A&E. Obs, ECG, bloods, triage to the relevant ward.
- nursing home. Personal care, feeding, activities to keep them occupied, how do you get a GP out then how do you get hold of their brand new prescription at 630pm on Friday for something starting tonight?
- Stroke unit. How to deal with stroke symptoms, patients deteriorating with these symptoms, and rehab.
- Orthopaedics. Broken bones, as on the tin... and a lot of elderly people with fractured hips. Some sort of having to sort out care packages and short term assistance at home once discharged from hospital (a bit like elderly medicine).
- Vascular. Mostly attempting to prevent people losing a leg. When you don't save a leg... there's a lot of personal care involved. Also a lot of post op observations like with day surgery and ortho.
Other placements people in my cohort had included district nurses, intermediate care, health visitors, school nurses, all sorts of medical and surgical wards, operating theatres and ICU.

I suppose that what I'm trying to highlight is the amount of personal care that's involved in nursing. There's also a lot of wound medication rounds, wound dressing, and continual assessment. Doctors are basically trained to diagnose people and nurses to look after them. There is the option of training as an ANP, but despite the ability to prescribe it's not quite like being a doctor.
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seam88
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(Original post by Emily_B)
Ultimately, you need an NMC registration to practice as a nurse. The "best" uni to study nursing is any one which offers an NMC accredited course - there's no other way of ending up registered, and when it comes to work places are only worried about whether you passed your nursing degree and are registered.
You need to figure out 1) which course appeals to you 2) where do you see yourself studying 3) how far from home do you want to be studying AND on placement for most of the year? (just bear in mind that student nurses don't get anywhere near as many holidays as other students).
I would also suggest you look at nursing related masters courses as well - although you won't know which direction you really want to end up going down until after qualifying.

As a student nurse, things I studied included:
- A&P. This was nowhere near in the same depth as medical school. these modules also included pharmacology
- holistic care
- multidisciplinary team working
- public health

Placements I had included:
- school immunisations. All about childhood immunisations. Mostly watching groups of children and teenagers getting their immunisations.
- Elderly medicine. Lots of basic personal care. How do you deal with someone from a nursing/residential home with dementia AND a UTI? How do you stop their skin breaking down because they can't mobilise and are doubly incontinent (and YOU have to keep cleaning them up)?
- Day surgery. Got to go to theatre to watch operations a few times, but mostly admitting patients, observing them post op, and then discharging.
- Coronary Care Unit. Personal care, observations, and watching monitors.
- A&E. Obs, ECG, bloods, triage to the relevant ward.
- nursing home. Personal care, feeding, activities to keep them occupied, how do you get a GP out then how do you get hold of their brand new prescription at 630pm on Friday for something starting tonight?
- Stroke unit. How to deal with stroke symptoms, patients deteriorating with these symptoms, and rehab.
- Orthopaedics. Broken bones, as on the tin... and a lot of elderly people with fractured hips. Some sort of having to sort out care packages and short term assistance at home once discharged from hospital (a bit like elderly medicine).
- Vascular. Mostly attempting to prevent people losing a leg. When you don't save a leg... there's a lot of personal care involved. Also a lot of post op observations like with day surgery and ortho.
Other placements people in my cohort had included district nurses, intermediate care, health visitors, school nurses, all sorts of medical and surgical wards, operating theatres and ICU.

I suppose that what I'm trying to highlight is the amount of personal care that's involved in nursing. There's also a lot of wound medication rounds, wound dressing, and continual assessment. Doctors are basically trained to diagnose people and nurses to look after them. There is the option of training as an ANP, but despite the ability to prescribe it's not quite like being a doctor.
Thankyou! That was really insightful
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