INeedHelp543
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i want to go to america for uni- ofc after the pandemic- but how hard is it for a british student to go to New York University-
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megascream
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It's a hard question to answer as we don't know anything about you.

But NYU is no where near the hardest ones in America to get into if you are not going to Stern. I once applied there for masters (which they do better than undergrad) I got their offer in two weeks without any interviews. Comparatively, I was rejected by UChicago and Berkeley and waited for months after interviews until hearing back from Columbia. NYU could be even easier for undergrad since LACs also attract some of the best students.

Also it's extremely hard to fund yourself. When I was applying the annual cost for tuition alone is around £40,000 (and their courses are longer) plus some international fees. You will also need more (usually, much more) than £10,000 to get a place to live. So my feeling is it's relatively easy to get a place to there, but quite hard to really be there with a healthy wallet.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by INeedHelp543)
i want to go to america for uni- ofc after the pandemic- but how hard is it for a british student to go to New York University-
NYU is competitive to get into, but not nearly as competitive as a lot of other colleges. We need to know more about you to give you advice and an indication of likeliness you may get in (though this is only an estimate - you can't guarantee anything as an international student applying to these kinds of schools).

Financially, it's expensive, but NYU offers financial aid to international students to help you fund it (presuming you're entering at undergrad level). Here's a link to their page: http://www.nyu.edu/admissions/underg...pplicants.html
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username2816962
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British equivalent of NYU would be along the lines of Bristol, Exeter, Manchester and other RG's.

So you can interpret that as 'competitive, but not unreasonably so, provided you meet the entry requirements.'

US unis provide an 'acceptance rate', however this is a very misleading figure. Unlike the UCAS system we have over here, American students can apply for 15 universities. This usually breaks down into 2-3 that are 'unlikely' (as in unlikely to be accepted), 2-3 'prefered' (as in likely to be accepted and are similar to our 'first choice') and 2-3 'safe' (pretty much 100% chance of acceptance).

This means there are far more people applying to a given US uni than a UK one. The UCAS 5 limit system acts as its own 'filter' in that people who are never going to get into Oxford will not even bother trying and wasting 1/5 of their allocations.

This is why Oxford has a pretty high acceptance rate, since the vast majority of people applying were always in with a pretty good chance of getting in anyway. The reason why places like Stanford in the US have a 4% acceptance rate is because there are thousands of students who apply who really shouldnt even bother and as such the uni has more rejects simply because it has more applications.

The same will go for somewhere like NYU, which is the most applied-to uni in the whole of the US, and is why it has a very low acceptance rate. However keep in mind that a good chunk of those applying have absolutely no chance of getting in.

US unis like and even encourage such a system, because they can boast about how 'selective' they are by pointing to their 10% acceptance rate. Many of the Ivy's and other well known unis in the US even send people to schools to encourage ALL students there to apply, knowing full well they may not even accept a single student from that school, but this increases their applications, which increases the number of rejects, which decreases their acceptance rate, which increases their 'selectivity' score.

I do not think that you are a very 'selective' institution simply because you don't accept people with a 2.3GPA (which would be around CDD at A level, but this system shows no sign of slowing or going away.

Moral of the story, don't get spooked by low acceptance rates, in fact, you should not pay them much attention at all. They are useful at giving a rough idea of how prestigious the school is, in the same way that looking at the height of a person gives a rough idea what their shoe size is, but you need far more info before you come to a conclusion.

But to answer how hard is it for British students to go, the answer is it is just as hard for any student from anywhere in the world. The REAL question is can you afford to go? It is very easy to graduate from a uni like NYU (located in one of the most expensive cities in the world) with debts of around $300,000 - $500,000, since tuition (and almost everything related to education,such as text books) in the US is far, far more expensive than the UK. THAT is what you should worry about first.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by bennyj901)
British equivalent of NYU would be along the lines of Bristol, Exeter, Manchester and other RG's.

So you can interpret that as 'competitive, but not unreasonably so, provided you meet the entry requirements.'

US unis provide an 'acceptance rate', however this is a very misleading figure. Unlike the UCAS system we have over here, American students can apply for 15 universities. This usually breaks down into 2-3 that are 'unlikely' (as in unlikely to be accepted), 2-3 'prefered' (as in likely to be accepted and are similar to our 'first choice') and 2-3 'safe' (pretty much 100% chance of acceptance).

This means there are far more people applying to a given US uni than a UK one. The UCAS 5 limit system acts as its own 'filter' in that people who are never going to get into Oxford will not even bother trying and wasting 1/5 of their allocations.

This is why Oxford has a pretty high acceptance rate, since the vast majority of people applying were always in with a pretty good chance of getting in anyway. The reason why places like Stanford in the US have a 4% acceptance rate is because there are thousands of students who apply who really shouldnt even bother and as such the uni has more rejects simply because it has more applications.

The same will go for somewhere like NYU, which is the most applied-to uni in the whole of the US, and is why it has a very low acceptance rate. However keep in mind that a good chunk of those applying have absolutely no chance of getting in.

US unis like and even encourage such a system, because they can boast about how 'selective' they are by pointing to their 10% acceptance rate. Many of the Ivy's and other well known unis in the US even send people to schools to encourage ALL students there to apply, knowing full well they may not even accept a single student from that school, but this increases their applications, which increases the number of rejects, which decreases their acceptance rate, which increases their 'selectivity' score.

I do not think that you are a very 'selective' institution simply because you don't accept people with a 2.3GPA (which would be around CDD at A level, but this system shows no sign of slowing or going away.

Moral of the story, don't get spooked by low acceptance rates, in fact, you should not pay them much attention at all. They are useful at giving a rough idea of how prestigious the school is, in the same way that looking at the height of a person gives a rough idea what their shoe size is, but you need far more info before you come to a conclusion.

But to answer how hard is it for British students to go, the answer is it is just as hard for any student from anywhere in the world. The REAL question is can you afford to go? It is very easy to graduate from a uni like NYU (located in one of the most expensive cities in the world) with debts of around $300,000 - $500,000, since tuition (and almost everything related to education,such as text books) in the US is far, far more expensive than the UK. THAT is what you should worry about first.
I definitely understand what you're saying here, but I don't know where you have got some of your information and figures from.

Firstly, yes. It is definitely true that the admission rates are lower because of more applicants, and not all of those applicants are qualified. But also consider this in relation to the population of the US (and this doesn't even consider international students!). There are literally millions more people in the US than the UK, so there will naturally be more applications, both on the more and less qualified side. Also, unfortunately, it is just a fact that US universities often have to turn away perfectly qualified applicants because there simply isn't space in the class. Additionally, more applicants just means a bigger pool you'll need to stand out in.

I'm not sure where you got the figure of 15 colleges from? There's technically no limit. You can apply to a maximum of 20 on CommomApp, with no limit outside (universities such as UCs, MIT, and others don't use CommonApp for their applications, meaning they don't count towards your 20).

NYU is not the most applied to university in the US. UCLA takes this title, and iirc, it has done for a few years now. NYU is still high though, ranking #6 in this metric (source: https://www.usnews.com/education/bes...re%20accepted.)

Your financial figures are also something I take a slight problem with. From NYU's website, their estimated cost of attendance for 2020-2021 is $78,742. Assuming this stays the same over 4 years, which it roughly will - don't expect any significant change - your total costs will be $314,968 (plus a few one-off costs such as flights and visa, and then your health insurance too). But even with this high cost, need-based financial aid is available to international students at NYU, as I mentioned in my previous post on this thread. Additionally, you'll have a very hard time graduating $300k-$500k in debt, since it will be almost impossible to find somebody who will loan you this much as an international student. You can't get federal loans. UK banks won't loan you this kind of money, as a student loan is already high risk, a student loan for a DIFFERENT COUNTRY is way too risky for them to do. And as for US-based banks and private loan companies? You'll need a US Citizen to co-sign, not exactly a viable option if you don't already have family in the US willing to take responsibility for that debt if you default.
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megascream
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
But even with this high cost, need-based financial aid is available to international students at NYU, as I mentioned in my previous post on this thread.
I wouldn't think too high about the need-based aid. The most approachable one needs to be applied through the US federal government and that's still quite brutal to get for UK students as international students from emerging economies would have more chances. Merit-based is mostly a dream. You have to be the top 1% or 2% for that. So finance is really a problem and is the most important reason that I never dare to choose US colleges for degree.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by megascream)
I wouldn't think too high about the need-based aid. The most approachable one needs to be applied through the US federal government and that's still quite brutal to get for UK students as international students from emerging economies would have more chances. Merit-based is mostly a dream. You have to be the top 1% or 2% for that. So finance is really a problem and is the most important reason that I never dare to choose US colleges for degree.
Need-based aid is institutional (meaning it is given by the college, not the federal government). International students can't get funding from the federal government.

A lot of colleges promise to meet 100% of demonstrated need. Need-based aid is a great thing - though I will concede it can affect your chances of admission at some need-aware schools. But even then, some need-aware schools are completely willing to take a student they'll have to give a lot of aid to if they really want them there.
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megascream
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
Need-based aid is institutional (meaning it is given by the college, not the federal government). International students can't get funding from the federal government.

A lot of colleges promise to meet 100% of demonstrated need. Need-based aid is a great thing - though I will concede it can affect your chances of admission at some need-aware schools. But even then, some need-aware schools are completely willing to take a student they'll have to give a lot of aid to if they really want them there.
When I was looking at the funding in the states I'm pretty sure all institutions direct me to fill a form from US federal government. Sorry I can't remember the name of that. Maybe something like federal aids... And in the end there were no funding anyway.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by megascream)
When I was looking at the funding in the states I'm pretty sure all institutions direct me to fill a form from US federal government. Sorry I can't remember the name of that. Maybe something like federal aids... And in the end there were no funding anyway.
The FAFSA? That's because you're not looking at the international student section of the website. Colleges use the CSS Profile, or the ISFAA in some cases, for international students. Funding is there at certain universities, and NYU is one of them.

Which institutions did you look at? If you were looking at any of the UCs (UCLA, Berkeley, etc.), they don't offer aid to international students.
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megascream
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
The FAFSA? That's because you're not looking at the international student section of the website. Colleges use the CSS Profile, or the ISFAA in some cases, for international students. Funding is there at certain universities, and NYU is one of them.

Which institutions did you look at? If you were looking at any of the UCs (UCLA, Berkeley, etc.), they don't offer aid to international students.
Yes, I applied Berkeley and got rejected, also rejected from UChicago. Offer from Columbia, NYU, Georgetown and UIUC. I was then suggested to apply funds after getting offers, but there were no available funding in the end and they were all extremely expensive.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by megascream)
Yes, I applied Berkeley and got rejected, also rejected from UChicago. Offer from Columbia, NYU, Georgetown and UIUC. I was then suggested to apply funds after getting offers, but there were no available funding in the end and they were all extremely expensive.
Columbia, NYU, and Georgetown all offer financial aid to international students, but as far as I know, you have to apply for aid at the time of applying for admission.

Columbia:

https://undergrad.admissions.columbia.edu/apply/intl_fa

"To be considered for financial aid, international applicants must indicate their intention to apply for financial aid at the time of their admission application. International students who were admitted with no request for Columbia financial aid may not subsequently change their status to apply for aid, even if their family financial circumstances change."

NYU:

https://www.nyu.edu/admissions/under...pplicants.html

"NYU is able to offer scholarships for non-U.S. Citizens or Permanent Residents applying as first-year students. Students qualify for need-based assistance based on the information presented in their CSS Profile. You must submit the CSS Profile successfully by the deadline to be considered for scholarships."

Georgetown:

https://uadmissions.georgetown.edu/financial-aid/

"Admitted students who have requested financial aid and are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents will be considered for a very limited number of need-based scholarships. To be considered for one of these scholarships, the student/applicant will need to indicate their intent to apply for financial aid on the Application for Undergraduate Admission and should submit a CSS/Financial Aid Profile online."

Interesting note: Georgetown actually appears to be need-blind, meaning that the amount of financial aid they’ll need to give you won’t affect your admissions decision
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mrcatsam
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(Original post by INeedHelp543)
i want to go to america for uni- ofc after the pandemic- but how hard is it for a british student to go to New York University-
NYU is a very good uni-don't get me wrong. However, it costs an exorbitant amount of money and there are other schools in New York that are far cheaper and just as good.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by mrcatsam)
NYU is a very good uni-don't get me wrong. However, it costs an exorbitant amount of money and there are other schools in New York that are far cheaper and just as good.
I.... if you read through the thread, they offer financial aid to help with the cost
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mrcatsam
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
I.... if you read through the thread, they offer financial aid to help with the cost
I'm aware, but it's important to be aware that the fees for international students are ~$80,000/year including all expenses, and financial aid is limited.
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titanic222
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NYU is not ideal for international students. Even though their site says they offer scholarships and all of that, in reality it's very very unlikely that you'll get funding as U.S. students are prioritised. There are tonnes of other universities in the U.S. that fund British international students. Perhaps take a look at some of the top liberal arts colleges for example.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by mrcatsam)
I'm aware, but it's important to be aware that the fees for international students are ~$80,000/year including all expenses, and financial aid is limited.
It's still possible to get full financial aid at these places though.
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mrcatsam
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
It's still possible to get full financial aid at these places though.
Yes, but NYU is the top choice for international students going to the US so the financial aid, as well as the admission, is not Ivy League calibre but still very competitive.
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