Shadow~
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Came across an article on Quora which claimed that we only coincidentally see examples of the Golden Ratio in nature and that it has no real significance. What do you think?
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SHADOW_SCRIPT
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well, it's more of something that describes something else, so its relative like time, which we can't see. Since its relative, it's not a noun, therefore it can not be seen.
Yeah, enjoy your waffle
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mqb2766
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(Original post by Shadow~)
Came across an article on Quora which claimed that we only coincidentally see examples of the Golden Ratio in nature and that it has no real significance. What do you think?
Many examples in art / architecture are probably a "close but no cigar" match with no real significance. It's role in things like fibonacci, regular pentagons, continued fractions etc is certainly real enough as it's a solution to simple equations.
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Shadow~
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(Original post by SHADOW_SCRIPT)
well, it's more of something that describes something else, so its relative like time, which we can't see. Since its relative, it's not a noun, therefore it can not be seen.
Yeah, enjoy your waffle
bro idk, high thoughts or whatever

(Original post by mqb2766)
Many examples in art / architecture are probably a "close but no cigar" match with no real significance. It's role in things like fibonacci, regular pentagons, continued fractions etc is certainly real enough as it's a solution to simple equations.
yeahh, I agree, I guess those people who claim that to have a beautiful face your proportions must align with the golden ratio just had a clever marketing ploy
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mqb2766
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(Original post by Shadow~)
yeahh, I agree, I guess those people who claim that to have a beautiful face your proportions must align with the golden ratio just had a clever marketing ploy
The only real way that it could be justified is to show that things were designed to the golden ratio, rather than observing they're close to it after the event. You can construct it (golden ratio rectangle) easily from a square, so who knows if people did this regularly, but not knowing is very different from citing things as examples. For me, the continued fraction representation is enough to justify its place in cool things about maths (whatever they are) and it's the first question in Siklos step book so ...
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DFranklin
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(Original post by mqb2766)
The only real way that it could be justified is to show that things were designed to the golden ratio, rather than observing they're close to it after the event. You can construct it (golden ratio rectangle) easily from a square, so who knows if people did this regularly, but not knowing is very different from citing things as examples. For me, the continued fraction representation is enough to justify its place in cool things about maths (whatever they are) and it's the first question in Siklos step book so ...
As you probably know, the continued fraction representation implies that "\phi is the most irrational number" (for a very particular interpretation of what that means).

You can argue that a natural process that wishes to avoid regularity (e.g. a plant that wants new branches to overshadow existing ones as little as possible) would evolve to have growth/branching factors close to the golden ratio.

I think it's easy to fit numbers to observations spuriously, however.
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Gregorius
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(Original post by DFranklin)
I think it's easy to fit numbers to observations spuriously, however.
We statisticians make a living doing this!
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mqb2766
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(Original post by DFranklin)
As you probably know, the continued fraction representation implies that "\phi is the most irrational number" (for a very particular interpretation of what that means)
I always think of it as the least irrational because of its trivial repeating pattern (but yes, I know what you mean and my interpretation is dodgy).
http://extremelearning.com.au/going-...-golden-ratio/
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