be honest...is law with french law only for native french speakers?

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juliesmith777
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#1
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#1
hi guys, so i'm choosing my a-level options right now. they're not set in stone but i've chosen english lit, history, french and spanish (i can drop one later if i want - would probably be one of the languages).
i've been thinking about possible uni courses i want to apply for, even though i know its a while away.
my strengths definitely lie in the essay based humanities and mfl, so i want to go into a course that plays to those strengths, but career prospects is a big thing for me too (which is why i was initially thinking of applying for an mfl degree course but now i've moved away from it). i thought law would be perfect for my a-level options, but i've always had a love for the languages and thought maybe combining french into my course could work for me (and the idea of a year abroad sounds amazing!!).
i know that law with french law isn't a french language degree, but instead just french law being taught in french. i also know they expect your french to be up to scratch, because law is hard enough and in a foreign language it's even harder.
so i was just wondering if someone could honestly tell me whether i stand a chance against the international students who speak fluent french whereas i would just be at a-level standard.
if you think i'm setting myself up for failure then just say, but i would be sad to leave behind my languages.
(just for reference, i'm looking to apply to some top unis like maybe oxford, ucl, kcl etc)
send help! thank you!!!!
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Compost
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#2
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#2
There's no requirement to be a native speaker. Of a year group of 11 I know who read Law with French Law at Nottingham, none of them was a native speaker.
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hootdoot04
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Could you do a degree in french then go on to train as an interpreter in the law field? Soz if this info ain’t 100% correct lol, my brains on two percent. Glad you love languages !!
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juliesmith777
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#4
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(Original post by Compost)
There's no requirement to be a native speaker. Of a year group of 11 I know who read Law with French Law at Nottingham, none of them was a native speaker.
ah okay thank you so much you’ve really reassured me! you don’t think that at more competitive unis it’s preferred, do you?
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juliesmith777
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#5
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#5
(Original post by hootdoot04)
Could you do a degree in french then go on to train as an interpreter in the law field? Soz if this info ain’t 100% correct lol, my brains on two percent. Glad you love languages !!
wow i’ve never thought of being an interpreter in the law field...thank you for suggesting it! i’ll have to look into it more, but you’ve got me interested now!!
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hootdoot04
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#6
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#6
(Original post by juliesmith777)
wow i’ve never thought of being an interpreter in the law field...thank you for suggesting it! i’ll have to look into it more, but you’ve got me interested now!!
Imho I think that languages would give you more opportunities in life than law...but it’s your life in the end! Glad to hear you’re interested
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chloenix
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#7
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#7
I'm applying to Law with French Law at several universities and I can assure you that you will be judged on the same level as non-native speakers. If you check the university requirements they usually ask for A minimum (some ask for B) in French, so this is what you should be aiming for.
Also, you learn French Law during your year abroad, if I remember correctly, and therefore they do prepare you for the level of language that will be required. Most of the other students will be in the same boat as you so don't stress!

The one thing I would recommend is asking yourself why you want to study Law with French Law! You say that you enjoy MFL but if that's the case maybe you'd prefer to study Law and French, which would include a year abroad too? You might want to do some research into the course and see what's involved, most people I know are applying to this course because A) they want to practice law in France, or B) they're interested in learning about two different legal systems. But anyway, good luck!
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