.2.0.0.3.
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999tigger
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(Original post by .2.0.0.3.)
There are alot of things like access programmes which allow students to get a contextual offer and often there are students who have higher predicted with an excellent personal statement and end up missing out on the same course. I personally think that everyone should get an equal opportunity, regardless of the area they study/live in. At the moment i feel like most of the opportunities at college have pretty much the same criteria as access programmes. I agree with the idea of access programmes but i feel like there also needs to be more opportunities for EVERYONE.

Do you think that students should get more equal support?

Are you sure your post makes sense? What are your points?
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.2.0.0.3.
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Are you sure your post makes sense? What are your points?
Sorry, i didnt think that it wouldnt make sense. In essence im just saying that people should get equal support. Throughout college i felt like there was alot of support for people who qualified for contextual offers through access programmes compared to other students. A levels are hard for everyone and I feel that everyone needs to be given the same chance at uni. Most unis give contextual offers which are 2 grades below the standard but would reject someone who is 1 grade below (not contextual). I just dont see how thats fair. Btw this is just my personal opinion...

Feel like i didnt explain my point clearly but i tried lol
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londonmyst
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No- I think that unis should be much more selective in terms of undergrad admissions.

I believe that uni selection should be based upon: the applicant's academic results/work history, career achievements, references, findings of mutual suitability between the course-uni-student and no red flags in terms of criminal history that could put safety on campus at risk.
With much greater resources available to those offered places in terms of uni financial support and corporate sponsorship offered to all high achieving UK citizen students.
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tinygirl96
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yes
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.2.0.0.3.
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(Original post by londonmyst)
No- I think that unis should be much more selective in terms of undergrad admissions.

I believe that uni selection should be based upon: the applicant's academic results/work history, career achievements, references, findings of mutual suitability between the course-uni-student and no red flags in terms of criminal history that could put safety on campus at risk.
With much greater resources available to those offered places in terms of uni financial support and corporate sponsorship offered to all high achieving UK citizen students.
Thats an interesting point of view. Thanks for replying!
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Blue_skies124
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Yes A levels are hard for everyone but some people are more privileged than others in the sense that they don’t come from a poor socioeconomic background , or don’t have divorced parents , live in a care home, are young carers and so on which prevent some students doing better than others so those contextual offers give people that are less privileged an opportunity
Last edited by Blue_skies124; 1 month ago
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999tigger
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(Original post by .2.0.0.3.)
Sorry, i didnt think that it wouldnt make sense. In essence im just saying that people should get equal support. Throughout college i felt like there was alot of support for people who qualified for contextual offers through access programmes compared to other students. A levels are hard for everyone and I feel that everyone needs to be given the same chance at uni. Most unis give contextual offers which are 2 grades below the standard but would reject someone who is 1 grade below (not contextual). I just dont see how thats fair. Btw this is just my personal opinion...

Feel like i didnt explain my point clearly but i tried lol
Do you mean Access to HE?
I hadnt realised contextual offers were based on which qualification you do and I thought whether you received a contextual offer was decided by the university?

Why didnt you qualify for a contextual offer?
What are the criteria?
School you go to?
Income? You mean you dont get free school meals?
Being in care? Have you ever been in care?
You arent the first to go to university?
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Mesopotamian.
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I personally don’t agree with contextual offers at all. Extenuating circumstances is one thing, but I don’t agree with contextuals. Controversial, I know.
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.2.0.0.3.
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(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
I personally don’t agree with contextual offers at all. Extenuating circumstances is one thing, but I don’t agree with contextuals. Controversial, I know.
Finally a person who shares my point. THANK YOU
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MadameRazz
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so... essentially you’re mad that poorer students get “more” support than other students? what?
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AstaYunoo
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They should increase them much much more regardless of background/grades/circumstances
The fact that an access programme gives students with another chance and hope means they don't give up on their dreams.
Contextual offers should not exist though imo
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AstaYunoo
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(Original post by Blue_skies124)
Yes A levels are hard for everyone but some people are more privileged than others in the sense that they don’t come from a poor socioeconomic backgrounds , or don’t have divorced parents , live in a care home, are young carers and so on which prevent some students doing better than others so those contextual offers give people that are less privileged an opportunity
Many contextual offers are falsified in an attempt to get X/Y to firm their university choice, contextual offers in general are very hit or miss as the individual may struggle immensely if they are let into a course where the normal grade requirements are much higher than their contextual offer
(eg AAA to ABB)
It also creates a sense that they don't need to work as hard/can lower their work ethic as to even apply to these courses, they needed to have the straight A's predicted
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1st superstar
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(Original post by Blue_skies124)
Yes A levels are hard for everyone but some people are more privileged than others in the sense that they don’t come from a poor socioeconomic background , or don’t have divorced parents , live in a care home, are young carers and so on which prevent some students doing better than others so those contextual offers give people that are less privileged an opportunity
Wouldn't say that someone with divoced parents is "less privileged" but other than that yeah.
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Tashax2
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(Original post by .2.0.0.3.)
Finally a person who shares my point. THANK YOU
Can I ask why ?
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Blue_skies124
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(Original post by 1st superstar)
Wouldn't say that someone with divoced parents is "less privileged" but other than that yeah.
Maybe not, but do go through a divorce especially whilst you’re studying is mentally difficult to go through but contextual offers aren’t based on that anyway.
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1st superstar
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(Original post by Blue_skies124)
Maybe not, but do go through a divorce especially whilst you’re studying is mentally difficult to go through but contextual offers aren’t based on that anyway.
Somewhat true.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by .2.0.0.3.)
There are alot of things like access programmes which allow students to get a contextual offer and often there are students who have higher predicted with an excellent personal statement and end up missing out on the same course. I personally think that everyone should get an equal opportunity, regardless of the area they study/live in. At the moment i feel like most of the opportunities at college have pretty much the same criteria as access programmes. I agree with the idea of access programmes but i feel like there also needs to be more opportunities for EVERYONE.

Do you think that students should get more equal support?
It seems a long and rambling way of saying you don't agree with contextual offers
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.2.0.0.3.
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(Original post by MadameRazz)
so... essentially you’re mad that poorer students get “more” support than other students? what?
This is kinda off topic. Absolutely not. For some students poverty really gives them a disadvantage and they do need that support so they get the same chance as everyone else. I dont know how you reached that conclusion tbh. I meant in some access programmes they take into account the area a person lives in and the area that the college is in. Personally i believe that your achievements arent determined by the area you live or the area your college is in. I think its such an irrelevant measure that gets taken into account.
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(Original post by harrysbar)
It seems a long and rambling way of saying you don't agree with contextual offers
I wouldnt say that i fully disagree with them. I think there should be more opportunites that benefit everyone. I get how some people are in need of more support than others but when youre all in the same class, all getting the exact same level of education why should some people be eligible for more opportunities than others? Some criteria for some access programmes includes things like youre only eligible if your parents didnt go to uni or if youre the first one in your family to go. How does that affect how people are gonna perform in their a levels? I know people who arent eligible for access programmes/contexual offers who struggle alot more than those who are eligible. Shouldnt these people who struggle also get some support? Do you see what i mean? Im not saying that they shouldnt completely scrap them, im saying they should weigh out the support they offer.
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