DOOODARS
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Hi, I got my mock back recently and got a C, which is far lower than what I expected. As it turns out, our entire class did bad (highest was a B, half the class got D)

I wasn’t in the lesson when they were going through the exam paper (self isolating) but from what I’ve gathered, the teacher just slapped a markscheme on the desks and just got everyone to look through it and compare with their papers. What people mostly failed on was exam technique. For example, there was a 12 marker comparing two drills and it had a table with six different pieces of information (centre of mass, how it gets its power etc)

We all assumed that it would be comparing each point in the table to get all twelve marks, but apparently we have to mention twelve separate points to get the marks, which we were never taught.

Additionally in the maths questions, people lost marks because their working out was different to the markscheme despite still getting the correct answer. We all think this was the teacher being lazy but I wanted to check on here.

We’ve done most of the exam papers for the new specification, and the textbook isn’t exactly helpful. Does anyone know of any good resources online that can help teach exam technique as well as knowledge? Thanks
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hustlr
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(Original post by Himynameisdaisy)
Hi, I got my mock back recently and got a C, which is far lower than what I expected. As it turns out, our entire class did bad (highest was a B, half the class got D)

I wasn’t in the lesson when they were going through the exam paper (self isolating) but from what I’ve gathered, the teacher just slapped a markscheme on the desks and just got everyone to look through it and compare with their papers. What people mostly failed on was exam technique. For example, there was a 12 marker comparing two drills and it had a table with six different pieces of information (centre of mass, how it gets its power etc)

We all assumed that it would be comparing each point in the table to get all twelve marks, but apparently we have to mention twelve separate points to get the marks, which we were never taught.

Additionally in the maths questions, people lost marks because their working out was different to the markscheme despite still getting the correct answer. We all think this was the teacher being lazy but I wanted to check on here.

We’ve done most of the exam papers for the new specification, and the textbook isn’t exactly helpful. Does anyone know of any good resources online that can help teach exam technique as well as knowledge? Thanks
What exam board do you do
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DOOODARS
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(Original post by hustlr)
What exam board do you do
AQA
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hustlr
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(Original post by Himynameisdaisy)
AQA
To be quite honest for Alevel dt there’s very few resources, I’m not sure about your specific exam board but you need to do most of your theory learning through the book, making concise notes. Also look at the specification as well as examiner notes and past papers you can find on the website. For your NEA look at the assessment guidelines for that as well.
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tinygirl96
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Hello

A word of advice
Make notes. Use flashcards.
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CoolCavy
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Hi, I did AQA A-level DT and have some revision notes if that would be of help to you (if you choose some topics you are struggling on i will paste the stuff i have on that for you)

Unfortunately revision technique is just practice, I would see your teacher if possible about this as there are a lack of AQA papers since this is still quite a relatively new spec. They could perhaps write you a few practice questions and give you some tips on how to best structure your answers. One thing I will say is try to use the marks as a guide, for example 8 mark questions generally require 8 or more details to hit all of those marks. Something i found useful when answering questions was to imagine writing your answer as bullet points, this isnt to say your answer should be disjointed and incoherent but mentally try to imagine yourself ticking off those 8 or more points.

Another thing i found quite helpful was to just go around my life and daily activities really scrutinising the products around me, take anything in your room, kitchen etc and just ask yourself the following questions: What is it made out of? How has it been made? Why has it been made this way? What purpose is it trying to fill? What areas of its purpose is it fulfilling well? and finally but most importantly; How could it's design be improved?

These are the sorts of questions which will help your critically evaluate a product, material choice, manufacture process or design in a similar way to how you will be required to in a paper. Furthermore by asking yourself these questions and looking up the answers when you cant answer them (for example what material it is made of) you are building up that tool kit of knowledge which will hopefully allow you to see that product on the exam paper and feel familiar enough with it to be able to answer calmly and thoughtfully.

Some good passive revision methods are watching videos of manufacturing processes, again this is building up that knowledge toolkit and also helping you to visualise and memorise these processes. BBC's 'Inside the Factory' is good for this as are the youtube videos 'How it works'

Some good revision resources are: MrDT (basic knowledge), Technology Student (basic knowledge), Roymech (good resource for a-level) and globalspec (advanced, aimed towards university students really but you can still pick out some good information)

Hope that helps, any questions just ask
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DOOODARS
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
Hi, I did AQA A-level DT and have some revision notes if that would be of help to you (if you choose some topics you are struggling on i will paste the stuff i have on that for you)

Unfortunately revision technique is just practice, I would see your teacher if possible about this as there are a lack of AQA papers since this is still quite a relatively new spec. They could perhaps write you a few practice questions and give you some tips on how to best structure your answers. One thing I will say is try to use the marks as a guide, for example 8 mark questions generally require 8 or more details to hit all of those marks. Something i found useful when answering questions was to imagine writing your answer as bullet points, this isnt to say your answer should be disjointed and incoherent but mentally try to imagine yourself ticking off those 8 or more points.

Another thing i found quite helpful was to just go around my life and daily activities really scrutinising the products around me, take anything in your room, kitchen etc and just ask yourself the following questions: What is it made out of? How has it been made? Why has it been made this way? What purpose is it trying to fill? What areas of its purpose is it fulfilling well? and finally but most importantly; How could it's design be improved?

These are the sorts of questions which will help your critically evaluate a product, material choice, manufacture process or design in a similar way to how you will be required to in a paper. Furthermore by asking yourself these questions and looking up the answers when you cant answer them (for example what material it is made of) you are building up that tool kit of knowledge which will hopefully allow you to see that product on the exam paper and feel familiar enough with it to be able to answer calmly and thoughtfully.

Some good passive revision methods are watching videos of manufacturing processes, again this is building up that knowledge toolkit and also helping you to visualise and memorise these processes. BBC's 'Inside the Factory' is good for this as are the youtube videos 'How it works'

Some good revision resources are: MrDT (basic knowledge), Technology Student (basic knowledge), Roymech (good resource for a-level) and globalspec (advanced, aimed towards university students really but you can still pick out some good information)

Hope that helps, any questions just ask
Brilliant, tysm. We have these powerpoints the school brought from outside which are really good for notes, so I usually just copy them down.

Tbh, my theory teacher is a bit crap, she doesn’t really help us individually and hasn’t taught us exam technique (hence why we all did bad on our mock)

That’s definitely a good idea analysing thing around me more often, probably should have thought of that sooner lmao.

I’m mainly just focusing on the coursework so that I have a bit of a fallback incase the exam goes wrong, though I’d rather that not be the case since I’m aiming for A/A*
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