jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
seen this thread that looked into how optom is a highly saturated and dying career, alot of cons with optometry which i agree with all of them. however, i really don't know what else to do if not optom...i really like science but don't want to work in a lab nor medicine as thats too much. ive already sent applications off through UCAS and im getting really scared that i havent made the right decision and i am unsure of what to do...
0
reply
McGinger
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
This suggests that there are many unfilled vacancies : https://jobs.opticianonline.net/jobs/optometrist/ - so I dont think you need to worry about job opportunities.
0
reply
Aisha197
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by jammypop101)
seen this thread that looked into how optom is a highly saturated and dying career, alot of cons with optometry which i agree with all of them. however, i really don't know what else to do if not optom...i really like science but don't want to work in a lab nor medicine as thats too much. ive already sent applications off through UCAS and im getting really scared that i havent made the right decision and i am unsure of what to do...
Hi! I don’t think it’s very saturated as if you look at the uni websites for optometry they have 100% employment rate for most unis so don’t worry! I’ve also applied for optom at Manchester, Bradford, Cardiff, UWE Bristol and aston. What unis have u applied to and have u heard back from Aston yet ?
1
reply
jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
Hey! I’ve applied to the same unis but city of london too. Which unis have you got offers from? Also which uni are you considering of going to?
0
reply
Aisha197
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by jammypop101)
Hey! I’ve applied to the same unis but city of london too. Which unis have you got offers from? Also which uni are you considering of going to?
I’ve gotten offers from Bradford + Cardiff, interview from Cardiff and a video/questionnaire type thing from UWE Bristol. What about u? Still waiting on Aston which is my first choice, what’s yours
0
reply
jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by Aisha197)
I’ve gotten offers from Bradford + Cardiff, interview from Cardiff and a video/questionnaire type thing from UWE Bristol. What about u? Still waiting on Aston which is my first choice, what’s yours
Aston’s gonna be my top choice, just struggling to choose between that or Manchester. What’s your insta lol (only because I don’t know anyone else going Aston and I’m lowkey nervous)
1
reply
Aisha197
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by jammypop101)
Aston’s gonna be my top choice, just struggling to choose between that or Manchester. What’s your insta lol (only because I don’t know anyone else going Aston and I’m lowkey nervous)
Yeah sure, I don’t know anyone else too 😬 @aisha_aqdis, where are you from anyway
0
reply
jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by Aisha197)
Yeah sure, I don’t know anyone else too 😬 @aisha_aqdis, where are you from anyway
I just requested you, I’ll send you a message too
0
reply
jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#9
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
Optometry is a highly saturated and dying career. It is the reason why I, as an optometrist, am in the process of leaving the profession. The problems I experienced which has driven me out of the profession:
- The commercial pressures applied by the large multiples is increasing year on year. Optometrists are judged by 'conversion rate' (i.e. the amount of patients they sell glasses to) and not by their clinical competence.
- Optometrist salaries are relatively poor. It was the worst hit profession during the 2009 financial crash.
- According to the Optical Workplace Survey, nearly 20% of the profession is considering leaving within the next 5 years.
- There has been a massive increase in the number of optometry schools to drive down salaries. Since I applied in 2008, the following schools and courses have opened: Plymouth, Portsmouth, UWE, Teeside, Huddersfield, Hertfordshire, UHI. The number of courses has literally doubled in a decade. There wasn't a shortage of Optometrists before these opened. This is going to mean that the employment rate is inevitably going to drop below 100%
- The Association of Optometrists, College of Optometrists and General Optical Council do not adequately support optometrists.

From my year alone, nearly 25% have left the profession already within 6 years of qualifying.

Optometry has a significant identity crisis. It is a healthcare profession which has been infected by commercial pressures. I would not recommend anyone to enter the profession.
So what are you going to do now? I’ve already submitted my applications for the degree...I really don’t know what else to do...
0
reply
jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
There are pro's and con's to Optometry. From my experience working in the profession:

Pro's:
- Professional respected field
- Stable employment
- Get to work with people
- Good work life balance

Con's:
- Little to no career progression
- Significant commercial pressures
- Stagnant/Declining salaries
- Gradually increasing clinical responsibility
- Limited remit

The way I see it, is that I do not want to spend the next 30 years of my life in a profession with no career progression, stagnant salaries, increasing commercial pressures, and increasing clinical responsibility. Which I why I have chosen to pursue medicine instead.

The profession is advertised as a healthcare clinically focused field. Unfortunately the reality for many is that they end up working day in day out for a big company selling glasses, and not doing much else. I have personally experienced a non-qualified (i.e not a healthcare practitioner) manager knocking on my door at lunch time telling me that I wasn't selling enough glasses. You would never have that at a dentist or pharmacy. So why optometry?

If I were you, I would be asking myself if I would be happy being in a guaranteed job post university, with a relatively low ceiling. Or do I go into another field where it may be a lot more competitive to get into a job post university, but the long term career prospects are better?
What do you think of orthoptics? The pay is lower than optom but a lot more varied and interesting as it’s more bio based than maths + physics which is optom based...?
0
reply
Ha loL
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
Orthoptists are almost exclusively based in the hospital setting, and are employed by the NHS. You won't experience the commercial pressures that you would in Optometry. Orthoptists generally work alongside the Ophthalmologists at the hospital.

You are correct in that the pay is lower than that of an Optometrist, but that is due to the fact that the responsibility, and expertise is less than that of an Optometrist. You are however not correct on the other aspects.

Optometry is substantially more varied than Orthoptics, and the courses would be more biology based than Orthoptics.

One benefit of studying Orthoptics however, is that I believe you are entitled to NHS funding and an NHS bursary.
Hey

I've also applied to Optometry at Aston didn't know it was such a bad career choice..
however I've also applied for diagnostic radiography, what are your thought on that as a future career?
0
reply
jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
Orthoptists are almost exclusively based in the hospital setting, and are employed by the NHS. You won't experience the commercial pressures that you would in Optometry. Orthoptists generally work alongside the Ophthalmologists at the hospital.

You are correct in that the pay is lower than that of an Optometrist, but that is due to the fact that the responsibility, and expertise is less than that of an Optometrist. You are however not correct on the other aspects.

Optometry is substantially more varied than Orthoptics, and the courses would be more biology based than Orthoptics.

One benefit of studying Orthoptics however, is that I believe you are entitled to NHS funding and an NHS bursary.
Optometrists are the ones that only do the eye tests..isn’t it the dispensing opticians that sell the glasses though?? Like the ones that work around in the store, they’re the ones that get the pressure for sales.... or is it because the manager wants you as an optometrist to make sure the patient ends up with glasses even if they don’t need it? (Which obviously you can’t do if they don’t need them)??
Last edited by jammypop101; 1 month ago
0
reply
jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
Optometrists don't 'only do the eye tests'. Optometrists can dispense in the same way that a Dispensing Optician (DO) can. We can also fit and assess contact lenses, assess binocular function (who do you think the Orthoptists get their patients from?), and most importantly perform ophthalmic examinations (who do you think refers to the Ophthalmologist?). There are Optometrists who perform intra-vitreal injections at the hospital, and those who are now independent prescribers, so have a prescription pad in the same was as a doctor so they can manage eye diseases like Glaucoma.

To over simplify things, an Optometrist can do everything that a Dispensing Optician (DO), Contact Lens Optician (CLO) & Orthoptist do, but these roles cannot do each others roles, and collectively do not cover all of the skills an Optometrist have.

The reason DO's are on the shop floor is that their remit does not extend to within the test room, so it makes sense that they are on the shop floor dealing with the glasses side of things. It makes financial sense as only the Optometrist can issue prescriptions for glasses, so why waste their time with people choosing glasses when they can get more people out ready to get glasses?

Optometrists get the biggest pressure for sales. Ultimately, as a healthcare practitioner, patients will trust your recommendations above that of any colleague on the shop floor.

Think about it, if a doctor said to you all was well, but the receptionist said you needed to get some medication, who would you trust?

Stores want Optometrists who are good salesmen, as ultimately, if they recommend glasses, people will buy them. A DO will also have sales pressure, but this will be to upgrade to designer frames, thinned down lenses, second pairs etc.
So are you a DO or an actual optometrist who would usually work within the eye test bit of a high street store?
0
reply
University of Sheffield Students
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
Orthoptists are almost exclusively based in the hospital setting, and are employed by the NHS. You won't experience the commercial pressures that you would in Optometry. Orthoptists generally work alongside the Ophthalmologists at the hospital.

You are correct in that the pay is lower than that of an Optometrist, but that is due to the fact that the responsibility, and expertise is less than that of an Optometrist. You are however not correct on the other aspects.

Optometry is substantially more varied than Orthoptics, and the courses would be more biology based than Orthoptics.

One benefit of studying Orthoptics however, is that I believe you are entitled to NHS funding and an NHS bursary.
(Original post by jammypop101)
seen this thread that looked into how optom is a highly saturated and dying career, alot of cons with optometry which i agree with all of them. however, i really don't know what else to do if not optom...i really like science but don't want to work in a lab nor medicine as thats too much. ive already sent applications off through UCAS and im getting really scared that i havent made the right decision and i am unsure of what to do...
Hi!

Current Orthoptics student here ! Thought I would pop in to let you know a bit more about Orthoptics as this may be a good alternative to consider. Orthoptists are in high demand at the moment and we are based in a hospital setting working in the eye clinics. The role of an Orthoptist is a lot more varied than that of an Optom and the level of expertise and responsibility is fairly similar across this multi-displinary team of eye specialists, so I do disagree with what has been said previously. An Orthoptist is an eye-care professional who treats people who experience problems or abnormalities with their vision, mostly concerned with eye movement. We are there to ensure your eyes are working properly together (binocular vision). A lot of our patients are young children who may have squints or lazy eye and our role is to correct the misallignment. Our role however also includes treating patients who have double vision, cataracts or eye diseases such as glaucoma. We also see a lot of people who have had strokes or who have neurological disorders and thus their vision is affected. We also carry out vision screening in primary schools on children. We make diagnoses and form management plans to treat patients as well as help with the prescribing of glasses alongside an Optom. Orthoptics is a very rewarding career to do, you get to make a significant impact on peoples lives and working for the NHS means there isn't the pressure of sales/commercialism, which is a main aspect of jobs I wanted to avoid. The pay is fairly similar, not much in it with the NHS pay rises and there are many opportunities to move up Bands within the role and hence increase your salary. An Orthoptists wage is usually slightly lower due to the fact you are working for the NHS, with Optoms you can work privately therefore the pay can be more, whereas Orthoptists don't work privately.

Also just to add an Optom 100% cannot do the role of an Orthoptist as I have seen mentioned above, to be an Orthoptist it is a separate degree requiring registration with the Health care professional council (HCPC) as a certified Orthoptist. The roles of an Orthoptist and Optom do overlap, there is parts of each profession which both of us do and enables us to refer between each role so the patients/customers receive the best care!

I personally love the course it is very Biology based but incorporates skills in physics and ethics plus a lot more !

I've linked a thread here where I have been sharing information and my experience as a student Orthoptist with other prospective students, I would recommend taking a look

Hope I have helped you out a bit, the main thing to remember is to do the course you are most interested in, don't let others opinions on a course put you off as everyone's experience is different!

Feel free to ask anymore questions!

Alisha
2nd Year
BMedSci Orthoptics
Last edited by University of Sheffield Students; 1 month ago
0
reply
University of Sheffield Students
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
Friendly question here, in what way is the role of an Orthoptist a lot more varied than that of an Optom? I have heard this banded around several times before, but no one has ever explained why this is the case!
Hi !

Thank you for your question. Obviously this is down to personal experience but has been mentioned many times by clinicians and lecturers when students are deciding between the two courses. This would also depend if an Optom is treating patients privately or for the NHS, as an NHS Optom is more similar to an Orthoptist as they work as a team. An Orthoptists role is more varied in the sense that patients who come to the clinic are being referred for a multitude of conditions all of which can have a multitude of aeitiologies. I think I have already covered this question in my previous response I will quote here and expand for you.

'An Orthoptist is an eye-care professional who treats people who experience problems or abnormalities with their vision, mostly concerned with eye movement. We are there to ensure your eyes are working properly together (binocular vision). A lot of our patients are young children who may have squints or lazy eye and our role is to correct the misallignment. Our role however also includes treating patients who have double vision, cataracts or eye diseases such as glaucoma. We also see a lot of people who have had strokes or who have neurological disorders and thus their vision is affected. We also carry out vision screening in primary schools on children. We make diagnoses and form management plans to treat patients as well as help with the prescribing of glasses alongside an Optom'

Orthoptists work on a more healthcare basis and in this profession no case is the same! I would say a privatised Optom has a more repeatable job everyday as the primary focus is the prescribing of glasses along with a brief assessment of visual health. An Orthoptist delves into this further and we get to make our own diagnosis for patients and provide management/treatment plans specific to their needs which all vary substantially!

Both careers are essential to form a competent and skilled multi-disciplinary team, the roles just vary in the type of people you will meet and treat. And it always comes down to personal preference also, certain roles are more suited to different individuals and it is essential to have this diversity

Hope this clarifies for you, as always if you have anymore questions feel free to ask!

Alisha
2nd Year
BMedSci Orthoptics
Last edited by University of Sheffield Students; 1 month ago
0
reply
jammypop101
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#16
Report Thread starter 2 weeks ago
#16
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
Hello Alisha,

Thank you for the well written response. So just wanted to respond to a few things really:

"Obviously this (Orthoptics being more varied than Optometry) is down to personal experience but has been mentioned many times by clinicians and lecturers when students are deciding between the two courses"

I find this to be curious, as I recall the exact same thing being mentioned by lecturers and clinicians when I attended open days! The only exception of course being that they said Optometry was more varied than Orthoptics. Both cannot be true, and I would accept that each would be biased (after all, if you want students to apply for your course, you would never say a similar course is better elsewhere!).

In my experience as an Optometrist (Private, Hospital and in Academia), I have generally observed that Optometry is more varied than Orthoptics, plainly due to the breadth of responsibilities. There is significant crossover between both professions.

"An Orthoptists role is more varied in the sense that patients who come to the clinic are being referred for a multitude of conditions all of which can have a multitude of aeitiologies"

These patients don't solely exist in secondary care, and more often than not are referred to secondary care from Optometrists.

In regards to your original quote (which itself was from the British and Irish Orthoptic Society's own website), I would point you towards another quote from the same page regarding Optometrists:

"Optometrists are trained to examine the eyes to detect defects in vision, signs of injury, ocular diseases or abnormality. They also identify the signs of problems with general health, such as diabetes of high blood pressure. All Optometrists are able to offer clinical advice, prescribe glasses or contact lenses and refer patients for further treatment. They typically work in high street opticians, carrying out eye examinations, but some also work in hospitals or community clinics.

Whereas an Orthoptist is concerned with how the eyes work together and interact with the brain to create vision, Optometrists are primarily focused on the examination of the eye itself."


We are legally obliged to perform an Ophthalmic examination. For example with myself, in a 30 minute appointment at least 20 minutes will be spent examining the eye. Not what I would call a 'brief assessment of visual health'.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Orthoptists play a crucial role in secondary care, especially with complex BV issues and visual rehabilitation. I have no doubt that any reasonably competent Orthoptist has a greater knowledge of treating and managing BV issues than most Optometrists. But Orthoptics is inherently less varied as a profession than Optometry, through specialising in BV and working in secondary care. We have the same patient base after all, what we do with them is different.

As an Optometrist I can choose to manage BV issues in house without referring into secondary care. I can prescribe glasses, prisms, patching therapy and convergence exercises. I can assess fusional reserves, ocular motility, saccades, stereopsis, depth of suppression etc. In fact I quite regularly do. There will be times of course that I refer into Orthoptics for their expertise regarding a BV anomaly beyond my competence.

As an Optometrist, in addition to my legal requirements to prescribe and perform ocular examinations, I can undertake further accreditations (in low vision/paediatrics/medical retina/glaucoma), provide emergency eye care examinations, contact lens fitting, perform domiciliary work, administer intra-vitreal injections and become an independent prescriber. Most of these I currently do, or have done previously.

As an Optometrist, I can choose to work in a high street practice, a smaller independent practice, a hospital, and university. Currently I work in three.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Which really brings me back to my original over simplification that an Optometrist can do what Orthoptists, Dispensing Opticians and Contact Lens Opticians can. For the most part we can, as it is within our remit and training. The breadth of our remit does not however allow us to have that depth which the other fields have, much like a GP compared to other specialities.

Which is why both careers are essential to form a competent and skilled multi-disciplinary team. If we did the same thing, there wouldn't be the need for both fields!
You said “can prescribe glasses, prisms, patching therapy and convergence exercises. I can assess fusional reserves, ocular motility, saccades, stereopsis, depth of suppression etc. In fact I quite regularly do.” Could you tell me more about this? It sounds so interesting about all the things you can assess as an optometrist! Also could you tell me more about “ further accreditations (in low vision/paediatrics/medical retina/glaucoma), provide emergency eye care examinations, contact lens fitting, perform domiciliary work, administer intra-vitreal injections.” It all sounds so interesting, I’d love to know more in detail!
0
reply
University of Sheffield Students
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#17
Report 2 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by brawnybalboa)
Hello Alisha,

Thank you for the well written response. So just wanted to respond to a few things really:

"Obviously this (Orthoptics being more varied than Optometry) is down to personal experience but has been mentioned many times by clinicians and lecturers when students are deciding between the two courses"

I find this to be curious, as I recall the exact same thing being mentioned by lecturers and clinicians when I attended open days! The only exception of course being that they said Optometry was more varied than Orthoptics. Both cannot be true, and I would accept that each would be biased (after all, if you want students to apply for your course, you would never say a similar course is better elsewhere!).

In my experience as an Optometrist (Private, Hospital and in Academia), I have generally observed that Optometry is more varied than Orthoptics, plainly due to the breadth of responsibilities. There is significant crossover between both professions.

"An Orthoptists role is more varied in the sense that patients who come to the clinic are being referred for a multitude of conditions all of which can have a multitude of aeitiologies"

These patients don't solely exist in secondary care, and more often than not are referred to secondary care from Optometrists.

In regards to your original quote (which itself was from the British and Irish Orthoptic Society's own website), I would point you towards another quote from the same page regarding Optometrists:

"Optometrists are trained to examine the eyes to detect defects in vision, signs of injury, ocular diseases or abnormality. They also identify the signs of problems with general health, such as diabetes of high blood pressure. All Optometrists are able to offer clinical advice, prescribe glasses or contact lenses and refer patients for further treatment. They typically work in high street opticians, carrying out eye examinations, but some also work in hospitals or community clinics.

Whereas an Orthoptist is concerned with how the eyes work together and interact with the brain to create vision, Optometrists are primarily focused on the examination of the eye itself."


We are legally obliged to perform an Ophthalmic examination. For example with myself, in a 30 minute appointment at least 20 minutes will be spent examining the eye. Not what I would call a 'brief assessment of visual health'.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Orthoptists play a crucial role in secondary care, especially with complex BV issues and visual rehabilitation. I have no doubt that any reasonably competent Orthoptist has a greater knowledge of treating and managing BV issues than most Optometrists. But Orthoptics is inherently less varied as a profession than Optometry, through specialising in BV and working in secondary care. We have the same patient base after all, what we do with them is different.

As an Optometrist I can choose to manage BV issues in house without referring into secondary care. I can prescribe glasses, prisms, patching therapy and convergence exercises. I can assess fusional reserves, ocular motility, saccades, stereopsis, depth of suppression etc. In fact I quite regularly do. There will be times of course that I refer into Orthoptics for their expertise regarding a BV anomaly beyond my competence.

As an Optometrist, in addition to my legal requirements to prescribe and perform ocular examinations, I can undertake further accreditations (in low vision/paediatrics/medical retina/glaucoma), provide emergency eye care examinations, contact lens fitting, perform domiciliary work, administer intra-vitreal injections and become an independent prescriber. Most of these I currently do, or have done previously.

As an Optometrist, I can choose to work in a high street practice, a smaller independent practice, a hospital, and university. Currently I work in three.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Which really brings me back to my original over simplification that an Optometrist can do what Orthoptists, Dispensing Opticians and Contact Lens Opticians can. For the most part we can, as it is within our remit and training. The breadth of our remit does not however allow us to have that depth which the other fields have, much like a GP compared to other specialities.

Which is why both careers are essential to form a competent and skilled multi-disciplinary team. If we did the same thing, there wouldn't be the need for both fields!
Hey!

Thank you for your response. As it seems from this we all have our bias' within the professions, what is shared by me is purely my experience of shadowing the professionals in the work environment and discussing their opinions on their own work which is supported with information from websites BIOS and my peers/lecturers. I think a lot of what you have said is mainly fulled by this bias as there is a lot of misconceptions and inaccuracies in what you have said. I think this is important to clarify for individuals interested in studying for these careers. There is a reason there are separate professions in this department of health, because different clinicians have different responsibilities and specialise in different aspects of care. I would like to repeat again an Optometrist cannot do the role of an Orthoptist or Dispensing Optician or any other role for that matter, there are overlaps like with anything in a health care career. By saying:

'As an Optometrist I can choose to manage BV (BSV) issues in house without referring into secondary care. I can prescribe glasses, prisms, patching therapy and convergence exercises. I can assess fusional reserves, ocular motility, saccades, stereopsis, depth of suppression etc. In fact I quite regularly do. There will be times of course that I refer into Orthoptics for their expertise regarding a BV (BSV) anomaly beyond my competence.'

It would be like me saying an Orthoptist can do the role of an Optometrist because we can assess vision and prescribe glasses, this barely touches the surface of what we manage and diagnose as Orthoptists as I am sure this would be for you if I were to say about Optometrists. Each profession is needed as they specialise and it would be arrogant for any profession to undermine the importance of another profession. The degrees are different and the roles are different as each are needed in the role of management of a patient.

I seem to think we will disagree on this based on our own experiences but Orthoptics for me is a much varied career from being in the hospital treating secondary care patients mainly. Most Optometrists do work privately and the career privately does not see secondary care patients on a daily basis if at all.

I'd like to point out this what you said:

'But Orthoptics is inherently less varied as a profession than Optometry, through specialising in BV and working in secondary care. We have the same patient base after all, what we do with them is different.'

The patient base is very similar in terms of a hospital Optom, but as you also mentioned earlier Optometrists refer to Orthoptists, in a hospital, where we work on further management of these patients which is beyond the whelms of an Optometrists eye examination.

I also see you have mentioned this previously in the thread, which doesn't coincide with what you have just mentioned:

' Optometry is a highly saturated and dying career. It is the reason why I, as an optometrist, am in the process of leaving the profession. The problems I experienced which has driven me out of the profession:
- The commercial pressures applied by the large multiples is increasing year on year. Optometrists are judged by 'conversion rate' (i.e. the amount of patients they sell glasses to) and not by their clinical competence.
- Optometrist salaries are relatively poor. It was the worst hit profession during the 2009 financial crash.
- According to the Optical Workplace Survey, nearly 20% of the profession is considering leaving within the next 5 years.
- There has been a massive increase in the number of optometry schools to drive down salaries. Since I applied in 2008, the following schools and courses have opened: Plymouth, Portsmouth, UWE, Teeside, Huddersfield, Hertfordshire, UHI. The number of courses has literally doubled in a decade. There wasn't a shortage of Optometrists before these opened. This is going to mean that the employment rate is inevitably going to drop below 100%
- The Association of Optometrists, College of Optometrists and General Optical Council do not adequately support optometrists.'

Which doesn't correlate exactly with what you have mentioned previously about how Optometry is varied.

What can be deduced from this is that there is a clear overlap between the professions, which I am sure we were both aware of prior to this discussion. But neither profession can complete the role of the other so by saying ' Which really brings me back to my original over simplification that an Optometrist can do what Orthoptists, Dispensing Opticians and Contact Lens Opticians can.' is inaccurate and undermines the importance of these professions so please think before saying something like this on a public platform in future.

Best wishes,

Alisha
2nd Year
BMedSci Orthoptics
Last edited by University of Sheffield Students; 1 week ago
0
reply
University of Sheffield Students
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#18
Report 2 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by jammypop101)
You said “can prescribe glasses, prisms, patching therapy and convergence exercises. I can assess fusional reserves, ocular motility, saccades, stereopsis, depth of suppression etc. In fact I quite regularly do.” Could you tell me more about this? It sounds so interesting about all the things you can assess as an optometrist! Also could you tell me more about “ further accreditations (in low vision/paediatrics/medical retina/glaucoma), provide emergency eye care examinations, contact lens fitting, perform domiciliary work, administer intra-vitreal injections.” It all sounds so interesting, I’d love to know more in detail!
Hey

Glad to hear you are interested in this aspect of visual health! This line of work mainly coincides with the work of an Orthoptist! I am not sure if you are interested in hearing about this in terms of from an Orthoptics point of view or if you are interested in Optometry? Orthoptists go into a lot more depth in this area of visual assessment and management than an Optometrist would. On a daily basis an Optometrist wouldn't do this, as privately they would refer to an Orthoptist to do this or if in the hospital the Orthoptist would complete this before referring to the Optom for their contributions to the management of the patient. Let me know if you would like to know more about this and I would love to help you out

Alisha
2nd Year
BMedSci Orthoptics
0
reply
Ha loL
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#19
Report 2 weeks ago
#19
What is the pay gap between a job within orphotics compared to an optometrist?
0
reply
University of Sheffield Students
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 week ago
#20
(Original post by Ha loL)
What is the pay gap between a job within orphotics compared to an optometrist?
Hi!

This would depend mainly on where you work. Orthoptist work for the NHS and therefore are payed following the 'Agenda for change' pay bands. A qualified Orthoptist typically starts on Band 5 (sometimes 6) and can progress into band 6 after 1 year of working. An Optometrist working in a hosptial would also follow this same pay scale although they often start on Band 6 of the pay scale. The NHS payscale allows for progression in careers and gives opportunies to work up in the NHS and obtain higher roles as you work for longer

There is information here on the type of pay you can expect as an Orthoptist or as an Hospital Optometrist :
(https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/wor...ange-pay-rates)

As for private Optometrists I am afraid I do not know much about their pay, I assume they will be more than working for the NHS as it is privatised but I would recommend looking into this yourself if it's an area you are interested in!

To summarise working for the NHS the pay is fairly similar as in both professions you can move up pay bands the more you work! When it comes to making the decision between them I would focus more on the degree/work which you find the most interesting as I personally found this the most important factor

Hope this helps you out! If you have anymore questions I am more than happy to answer

Alisha
2nd Year
BMedSci
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (195)
58.38%
I don't have everything I need (139)
41.62%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise