aque1408
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Why are more antibodies produced in the secondary immune response compared to the primary immune response? I get that it's faster because antibodies are recognised easier but what enables it to be stronger?
Last edited by aque1408; 1 month ago
0
reply
becausethenight
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
What level are you studying this at?
The "short answer" is basically: memory B cell clones are already present in the secondary lymphatic organs, so they can produce more antibody more quickly.
0
reply
roronoa
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by aque1408)
Why are more antibodies produced in the secondary immune response compared to the primary immune response? I get that its faster because antibodies are recognised easier but what enables it to be stronger?
the infection is recognised sooner because T-memory cells remember the antigens, so B-memory cell antibodies can be produced before the infection spreads or develops, so it's effectively easier to attack and get rid of because there's "less of it". we get taught it's more rapid, but i guess it's also stronger just because it's effective more quickly
0
reply
aque1408
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by roronoa)
the infection is recognised sooner because T-memory cells remember the antigens, so B-memory cell antibodies can be produced before the infection spreads or develops, so it's effectively easier to attack and get rid of because there's "less of it". we get taught it's more rapid, but i guess it's also stronger just because it's effective more quickly
Thanks for your reply. I get the logic with it being more effective but on graphs representing the relative production of antibodies in each response, there always seem to be more produced in the secondary response (e.g. https://microbiologynotes.com/differ...mune-response/). I understand why this is useful (as more antibodies = better response) but I'm wondering what sort of mechanism allows this to happen and why the same blood antibody concentration isn't replicated in the primary immune response (but would take longer to develop as clonal selection would need to occur)
0
reply
aque1408
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by becausethenight)
What level are you studying this at?
The "short answer" is basically: memory B cell clones are already present in the secondary lymphatic organs, so they can produce more antibody more quickly.
A-level but it's not for an exam question or anything, I'm just genuinely interested and the ambiguity in the textbook is annoying me. I've tried doing some research online with limited luck as it seems to just be a stated fact.

Side note: I'm applying for medicine this year and see you help out in loads of threads so just wanted to say thank you for everything you do!
Last edited by aque1408; 1 month ago
0
reply
roronoa
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by aque1408)
Thanks for your reply. I get the logic with it being more effective but on graphs representing the relative production of antibodies in each response, there always seem to be more produced in the secondary response (e.g. https://microbiologynotes.com/differ...mune-response/). I understand why this is useful (as more antibodies = better response) but I'm wondering what sort of mechanism allows this to happen and why the same blood antibody concentration isn't replicated in the primary immune response (but would take longer to develop as clonal selection would need to occur)
i think more are produced because the body knows what it's trying to produce. as though the blueprints are already there. that's all i can think of though, I'm not so sure myself. hope it helps!
0
reply
hiiiii1
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
The memory cells produced in the primary response divide by mitosis in secondary response. So, these can develop into plasma cells, so there would be more plasma cells in the secondary response. As a result, more cells can respond to antigen and therefore have a greater chance to find them. This forms an immunological memory since less time would need to be taken to produce the same number of plasma cells.
0
reply
aque1408
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by hiiiii1)
The memory cells produced in the primary response divide by mitosis in secondary response. So, these can develop into plasma cells, so there would be more plasma cells in the secondary response. As a result, more cells can respond to antigen and therefore have a greater chance to find them. This forms an immunological memory since less time would need to be taken to produce the same number of plasma cells.
Thank you for your reply!

I'm confused at the fact that just because less time is needed to produce the same number, why does that mean more are produced? In fact, I would expect there to be more antibodies produced overall in the primary immune response as it takes longer (due to clonal selection) so the pathogen would have more time to replicate = more antibodies need to be produced to 'deal' with them
0
reply
hiiiii1
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by aque1408)
Thank you for your reply!

I'm confused at the fact that just because less time is needed to produce the same number, why does that mean more are produced? In fact, I would expect there to be more antibodies produced overall in the primary immune response as it takes longer (due to clonal selection) so the pathogen would have more time to replicate = more antibodies need to be produced to 'deal' with them
You are right it does take more time in the primary response, hence the secondary response is stronger as the antigens can be recognised more quickly and easily. More antibodies are produced because of more plasma cells - they secrete the antibodies for them to recognise the antigens. B cells differentiate to form plasma cells.
0
reply
becausethenight
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by aque1408)
A-level but its not for an exam question or anything, I'm just genuinely interested and the ambiguity in the textbook is annoying me. I've tried doing some research online with limited luck as it seems to just be a stated fact.

Side note: I'm applying for medicine this year and see you help out in loads of threads so just wanted to say thank you for everything you do!
If you want to go crazy, we're studying this at the moment, so here's the relevant textbook chapter which will definitely be more in depth at least: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK27158/

Immunology is bloody complicated though, be warned

And :ta::heart: Good luck with your application - any chance you'll be an ICL fresher this time next year?
1
reply
aque1408
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by becausethenight)
If you want to go crazy, we're studying this at the moment, so here's the relevant textbook chapter which will definitely be more in depth at least: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK27158/

Immunology is bloody complicated though, be warned

And :ta::heart: Good luck with your application - any chance you'll be an ICL fresher this time next year?
Thank you, I'll definitely give it a read!
ICL and UCL are my dream schools and my BMAT came out ok so hopefully!
0
reply
becausethenight
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by aque1408)
Thank you, I'll definitely give it a read!
ICL and UCL are my dream schools and my BMAT came out ok so hopefully!
Hope you enjoy - let me know how you find it
Great, best of luck! Looking forward to seeing you on campus (or on the rival campus )
0
reply
aque1408
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by becausethenight)
Hope you enjoy - let me know how you find it
Great, best of luck! Looking forward to seeing you on campus (or on the rival campus )
Haha, Thanks!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (195)
58.38%
I don't have everything I need (139)
41.62%

Watched Threads

View All