UserName734
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I am applying to Cambridge next year, I want to do physical natural sciences
does anyone have any advice or anything that might improve my chances of getting accepted, I am completely committed and willing to do basically anything,
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Typhoon23
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I would suggest to start revising for admissions assements as soon as you can, the exams are usually the first week in October and are very challenging so the more practice you can get in the better. Just make sure you leave some practice papers for nearer the time.
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Emily~3695
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I’m applying next year as well, do u have any idea which college you might apply to?
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UserName734
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(Original post by Emily~3695)
I’m applying next year as well, do u have any idea which college you might apply to?
I am not sure yet ,but people from my school have gone to Jesus Collage in past years so I might try there, I am also thinking maybe Churchill Collage, I had a look at there website and it looks good. What about You?
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ShootForTheStars
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Just be aware Churchill ask for a A* in Further Maths if taken.
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UserName734
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(Original post by ShootForTheStars)
Just be aware Churchill ask for a A* in Further Maths if taken
Wow thanks for letting me know, I was expecting 4 A level offer but I don't want to count on more than an A at further Maths because at that point I think it becomes too much of a risk, for me least
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CambridgeMama
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(Original post by UserName734)
I am applying to Cambridge next year, I want to do physical natural sciences
does anyone have any advice or anything that might improve my chances of getting accepted, I am completely committed and willing to do basically anything,
Hi there, my kid got a place on the PhysNatsci course. His primary interest was in physics, but he has now got really into chemistry since he started it. This is what I advise: First of all, sign up for the Isaac Physics Mentoring Scheme here: https://isaacphysics.org/pages/isaac_mentor. Also, once you are registered on Isaac Physics, make yourself do some Isaac Physics, Maths or Chemistry every day (but you are allowed to have one day a week off) for ten or even twenty minutes.

Secondly, read widely on subjects that specifically interest you. I recommend perhaps avoiding cliched popular scientists like Brian Cox, because I expect Admissions Tutors remain unimpressed when he is mentioned in anyone’s statement. There is the really excellent and genuinely informative book, Why Chemical Reactions Happen by Wothers and Keeler (Wothers is at St Catharine’s and Keeler is at Selwyn, if you are going to get an interview at either college, it is likely you would be interviewed by one of those two learned Professors, they are both very charming). For other book ideas, look through the recommended reading lists from both Oxford and Cambridge Colleges, and perhaps some US universities and chose stuff aimed at people who are in Year 12 or Year 13 under university age rather than unintelligible First Year texts.

Watch lecture series on YouTube like this one by Leonard Susskind: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...8x1lo-O_kpZGk8 or any others that take your fancy.

when you get your interview you will need to demonstrate a high level of skill in maths, preferably in further maths. This will underly all the interviews you have even the physics and chemistry, so try very hard with maths and do everything you can to make sure there are no holes in your maths, if you shine in your maths, this will serve you very well.

My son was really interested in astrophysics and joined a local society and attended weekly meetings which he thoroughly enjoyed, even though he was the youngest one there. He also attended three Masterclasses in Cambridge and did a Sutton Trust summer school. A summer school at any university in Chemistry or physics will serve you well. Imperial offers these as well as Cambridge and Oxford. He also attended the Cavendish Laboratory 6th Form Physics Lectures, perhaps those will be online this year?

Your statement should explain Clearly, enthusiastically yet concisely what you learned while doing each of the above, when you say that you did something, also explain what you got out of it. Your statement does carry quite a lot of weight because there will be lots of statements to read so they need to be non-cliched ones that are authentic and stand-out from all the ones droning-on about Stephen Hawking, Einstein and Brian Cox (although all three were/are great people).

It is a big effort to prep an application for Oxbridge and very much worth the time – you are great because you have started to prepare early and you have sought out other people’s advice. I wish you all the very best of luck and hope you will come to Cambridge one day.
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Typhoon23
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(Original post by UserName734)
Wow thanks for letting me know, I was expecting 4 A level offer but I don't want to count on more than an A at further Maths because at that point I think it becomes too much of a risk, for me least
Be aware that Cambridge rarely give a 4 Alevel offer. Whilst it is certainly a great advantage to have done 4 A'levels, Cambridge want applicants who achive top grades in the 3 most important subjects for their course. Any other subject is seen as a sort of 'bonus' to show dedication to your chosen degree, but should never come at the expense of your 3 main subjects. Hence, they do not reward taking 4 subjects with a lower offer.
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UserName734
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(Original post by Typhoon23)
Be aware that Cambridge rarely give a 4 Alevel offer. Whilst it is certainly a great advantage to have done 4 A'levels, Cambridge want applicants who achive top grades in the 3 most important subjects for their course. Any other subject is seen as a sort of 'bonus' to show dedication to your chosen degree, but should never come at the expense of your 3 main subjects. Hence, they do not reward taking 4 subjects with a lower offer.
but dont some collages whant to see you have done well in further maths in addition to your main subjects?
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CambridgeMama
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(Original post by Typhoon23)
Be aware that Cambridge rarely give a 4 Alevel offer. Whilst it is certainly a great advantage to have done 4 A'levels, Cambridge want applicants who achive top grades in the 3 most important subjects for their course. Any other subject is seen as a sort of 'bonus' to show dedication to your chosen degree, but should never come at the expense of your 3 main subjects. Hence, they do not reward taking 4 subjects with a lower offer.
No, I think this is not correct, not for science subjects. If you go to an independent school and you’re doing four A Levels, you will be given a four A Level offer (as long as all four A Levels are science or mathematics A Leves). I think that most science applicants doing four A Levels will get a four A Level offer, and they will also been more likely to have been offered an interview. You could trawl through the stats and/or you could ask the uni or College Via FOI about it. I do not know about humanities though.
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philogrobized
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(Original post by CambridgeMama)
Hi there, my kid got a place on the PhysNatsci course. His primary interest was in physics, but he has now got really into chemistry since he started it. This is what I advise: First of all, sign up for the Isaac Physics Mentoring Scheme here: https://isaacphysics.org/pages/isaac_mentor. Also, once you are registered on Isaac Physics, make yourself do some Isaac Physics, Maths or Chemistry every day (but you are allowed to have one day a week off) for ten or even twenty minutes.

Secondly, read widely on subjects that specifically interest you. I recommend perhaps avoiding cliched popular scientists like Brian Cox, because I expect Admissions Tutors remain unimpressed when he is mentioned in anyone’s statement. There is the really excellent and genuinely informative book, Why Chemical Reactions Happen by Wothers and Keeler (Wothers is at St Catharine’s and Keeler is at Selwyn, if you are going to get an interview at either college, it is likely you would be interviewed by one of those two learned Professors, they are both very charming). For other book ideas, look through the recommended reading lists from both Oxford and Cambridge Colleges, and perhaps some US universities and chose stuff aimed at people who are in Year 12 or Year 13 under university age rather than unintelligible First Year texts.

Watch lecture series on YouTube like this one by Leonard Susskind: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...8x1lo-O_kpZGk8 or any others that take your fancy.

when you get your interview you will need to demonstrate a high level of skill in maths, preferably in further maths. This will underly all the interviews you have even the physics and chemistry, so try very hard with maths and do everything you can to make sure there are no holes in your maths, if you shine in your maths, this will serve you very well.

My son was really interested in astrophysics and joined a local society and attended weekly meetings which he thoroughly enjoyed, even though he was the youngest one there. He also attended three Masterclasses in Cambridge and did a Sutton Trust summer school. A summer school at any university in Chemistry or physics will serve you well. Imperial offers these as well as Cambridge and Oxford. He also attended the Cavendish Laboratory 6th Form Physics Lectures, perhaps those will be online this year?

Your statement should explain Clearly, enthusiastically yet concisely what you learned while doing each of the above, when you say that you did something, also explain what you got out of it. Your statement does carry quite a lot of weight because there will be lots of statements to read so they need to be non-cliched ones that are authentic and stand-out from all the ones droning-on about Stephen Hawking, Einstein and Brian Cox (although all three were/are great people).

It is a big effort to prep an application for Oxbridge and very much worth the time – you are great because you have started to prepare early and you have sought out other people’s advice. I wish you all the very best of luck and hope you will come to Cambridge one day.
thank you so much for this advice! I will be taking this into account
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UserName734
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(Original post by CambridgeMama)
Hi there, my kid got a place on the PhysNatsci course. His primary interest was in physics, but he has now got really into chemistry since he started it. This is what I advise: First of all, sign up for the Isaac Physics Mentoring Scheme here: https://isaacphysics.org/pages/isaac_mentor. Also, once you are registered on Isaac Physics, make yourself do some Isaac Physics, Maths or Chemistry every day (but you are allowed to have one day a week off) for ten or even twenty minutes.

Secondly, read widely on subjects that specifically interest you. I recommend perhaps avoiding cliched popular scientists like Brian Cox, because I expect Admissions Tutors remain unimpressed when he is mentioned in anyone’s statement. There is the really excellent and genuinely informative book, Why Chemical Reactions Happen by Wothers and Keeler (Wothers is at St Catharine’s and Keeler is at Selwyn, if you are going to get an interview at either college, it is likely you would be interviewed by one of those two learned Professors, they are both very charming). For other book ideas, look through the recommended reading lists from both Oxford and Cambridge Colleges, and perhaps some US universities and chose stuff aimed at people who are in Year 12 or Year 13 under university age rather than unintelligible First Year texts.

Watch lecture series on YouTube like this one by Leonard Susskind: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...8x1lo-O_kpZGk8 or any others that take your fancy.

when you get your interview you will need to demonstrate a high level of skill in maths, preferably in further maths. This will underly all the interviews you have even the physics and chemistry, so try very hard with maths and do everything you can to make sure there are no holes in your maths, if you shine in your maths, this will serve you very well.

My son was really interested in astrophysics and joined a local society and attended weekly meetings which he thoroughly enjoyed, even though he was the youngest one there. He also attended three Masterclasses in Cambridge and did a Sutton Trust summer school. A summer school at any university in Chemistry or physics will serve you well. Imperial offers these as well as Cambridge and Oxford. He also attended the Cavendish Laboratory 6th Form Physics Lectures, perhaps those will be online this year?

Your statement should explain Clearly, enthusiastically yet concisely what you learned while doing each of the above, when you say that you did something, also explain what you got out of it. Your statement does carry quite a lot of weight because there will be lots of statements to read so they need to be non-cliched ones that are authentic and stand-out from all the ones droning-on about Stephen Hawking, Einstein and Brian Cox (although all three were/are great people).

It is a big effort to prep an application for Oxbridge and very much worth the time – you are great because you have started to prepare early and you have sought out other people’s advice. I wish you all the very best of luck and hope you will come to Cambridge one day.
Thank you so much this is really great advice
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