alg.xx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Is it better to go to Cambridge/Oxford/UCL/LSE to study accountancy OR is it better to go for the PWC flying start degree that is studied at either one of these universities : Alliance Manchester business school / Nottingham university/ Henley business school / Newcastle university.
0
reply
rahilgandhi
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
I graduated from Newcastle University flying start programme and I would recommend it only if you know what audit is and are sure that thats where you want to start your career. Otherwise I would recommend doing an accountancy course in any of the top unis you mentioned as you will have wider options in terms of what modules you study and the backing of a big brand uni for the jobs you apply.
0
reply
alg.xx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by rahilgandhi)
I graduated from Newcastle University flying start programme and I would recommend it only if you know what audit is and are sure that thats where you want to start your career. Otherwise I would recommend doing an accountancy course in any of the top unis you mentioned as you will have wider options in terms of what modules you study and the backing of a big brand uni for the jobs you apply.
I know I want to do accountancy but if I go to those top universities, I'll have to take the ACA qualification separately which could take an extra 3 years. The flying start degree would take me a total of 5 years to finish everything ( 1 year less than a flying start degree ) but I'm wondering if that 1 year extra of ACA content compared with the flying start degreed is worth me going to a top university, especially if employers don't generally care what uni you graduated from. What do you think?
Last edited by alg.xx; 1 month ago
0
reply
BenRyan99
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
I think the OP is mistaken in that you can't really go to a top uni to do accounting. Oxford, Cambridge and UCL don't teach it. Only LSE and Warwick teach accounting and finance, not just accounting.
1
reply
rahilgandhi
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by alg.xx)
I know I want to do accountancy but if I go to those top universities, I'll have to take the ACA qualification separately which could take an extra 3 years. The flying start degree would take me a total of 5 years to finish everything ( 1 year less than a flying start degree ) but I'm wondering if that 1 year extra of ACA content compared with the flying start degreed is worth me going to a top university, especially if employers don't generally care what uni you graduated from. What do you think?
Well auditing is only a subset of acccounting. If you want to work on deals, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate finance at PwC or another big 4, the flying start degree may not be the best route. Other top unis will help you build a stronger profile to get into more grad schemes than flying start unis. However, if you are sure that you want to audit- flying start is a great option. Other things you may wish to consider is that flying start degrees are generally less stressful compared to a normal degree as you already have a job secured so you don't need to apply to 40-50 grad schemes and attend so many assessment centres in your last year in uni. This makes the "uni experience" more "fun". But if I got to go back to uni, I would have gone to a top uni as I now wish to work in corporate finance but am finding to hard to transition (maybe just because of the slowdown in job market due to covid).
0
reply
alg.xx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by rahilgandhi)
Well auditing is only a subset of acccounting. If you want to work on deals, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate finance at PwC or another big 4, the flying start degree may not be the best route. Other top unis will help you build a stronger profile to get into more grad schemes than flying start unis. However, if you are sure that you want to audit- flying start is a great option. Other things you may wish to consider is that flying start degrees are generally less stressful compared to a normal degree as you already have a job secured so you don't need to apply to 40-50 grad schemes and attend so many assessment centres in your last year in uni. This makes the "uni experience" more "fun". But if I got to go back to uni, I would have gone to a top uni as I now wish to work in corporate finance but am finding to hard to transition (maybe just because of the slowdown in job market due to covid).
I don’t want to sound incompetent but what is the difference between audit and deals etc. If you gain the ACA, I thought you could go into these routes anyway.
Thanks
0
reply
rahilgandhi
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by alg.xx)
I don’t want to sound incompetent but what is the difference between audit and deals etc. If you gain the ACA, I thought you could go into these routes anyway.
Thanks
That's not a problem at all, I would advise going through various grad schemes on the internet. Here is the PwC deals scheme for you.

https://www.pwc.co.uk/careers/studen...ies/deals.html
0
reply
alg.xx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by rahilgandhi)
That's not a problem at all, I would advise going through various grad schemes on the internet. Here is the PwC deals scheme for you.

https://www.pwc.co.uk/careers/studen...ies/deals.html
Thank you. So was I mistaken to believe that the ACA course can open up copious routes on top of audit, regardless of what route ( deals, tax etc )you take?
0
reply
BenRyan99
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by alg.xx)
Thank you. So was I mistaken to believe that the ACA course can open up copious routes on top of audit, regardless of what route ( deals, tax etc )you take?
The ACA course essentially can open up doors to other areas such as transactional services, restructuring, deals advisory and M&A. It's unlikely for someone to go from audit and the ACA to tax as they do a different set of exams.

I think the point (which is probably true to some extent) which the person made is that it's hard to move into banks or elite advisory firms without also having a strong undergrad degree. I think this is more cultural than based on technical skills. Investment banks need their employees to perform when dealing with important clients and these archaic institutions rightly or wrongly can be quite snobby so tend to hire people who come from strong academic backgrounds. This can make moves from the big4 to elite firms difficult if you go to just a regular Russell group university or do a degree apprenticeship.
0
reply
alg.xx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by BenRyan99)
The ACA course essentially can open up doors to other areas such as transactional services, restructuring, deals advisory and M&A. It's unlikely for someone to go from audit and the ACA to tax as they do a different set of exams.

I think the point (which is probably true to some extent) which the person made is that it's hard to move into banks or elite advisory firms without also having a strong undergrad degree. I think this is more cultural than based on technical skills. Investment banks need their employees to perform when dealing with important clients and these archaic institutions rightly or wrongly can be quite snobby so tend to hire people who come from strong academic backgrounds. This can make moves from the big4 to elite firms difficult if you go to just a regular Russell group university or do a degree apprenticeship.
So essentially, this only applies to moving into investment banking? Banking isn’t something I’m interested in anyway. What are elite firms and do you mind giving me examples of some. Thanks
0
reply
alg.xx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#11
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by BenRyan99)
The ACA course essentially can open up doors to other areas such as transactional services, restructuring, deals advisory and M&A. It's unlikely for someone to go from audit and the ACA to tax as they do a different set of exams.

I think the point (which is probably true to some extent) which the person made is that it's hard to move into banks or elite advisory firms without also having a strong undergrad degree. I think this is more cultural than based on technical skills. Investment banks need their employees to perform when dealing with important clients and these archaic institutions rightly or wrongly can be quite snobby so tend to hire people who come from strong academic backgrounds. This can make moves from the big4 to elite firms difficult if you go to just a regular Russell group university or do a degree apprenticeship.
I could still have a strong undergrad degree as if I go for the flying start program, I would be awarded a Bachelors hons as well as experience and a work placement in the end. If elite firms look down on those who apply to flying start programs, then I’m sure you can simply claim you achieved a degree along with the qualification separately AND some work experience. Am I wrong ?
0
reply
Tregi11
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 weeks ago
#12
Hi guys I’m debating between a PWC sponsored course in Nottingham and Accounting and finance course at Warwick. See the thing is Warwick is a Investment banker target uni.So if I do the PWC course,I can’t get into to IB but creates a good path for Audit in Big 4. It’s tough , can someone help me decide.
Course requirements for both is AAB for me and I’m predicted A*ABB and I have already achieved the A*.
Last edited by Tregi11; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
alg.xx
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#13
Report Thread starter 3 days ago
#13
(Original post by rahilgandhi)
I graduated from Newcastle University flying start programme and I would recommend it only if you know what audit is and are sure that thats where you want to start your career. Otherwise I would recommend doing an accountancy course in any of the top unis you mentioned as you will have wider options in terms of what modules you study and the backing of a big brand uni for the jobs you apply.
Hey I know this message was from a while ago, but why would it be difficult to transition into a different niche with this program? I thought the ACA opened copious doors etc. Also since I’m still quite young, how do I know audit is for me? Thanks
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (186)
58.31%
I don't have everything I need (133)
41.69%

Watched Threads

View All