ItsAnotherGrad
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Hey guys,

I've been trying to find a placement for teacher training for this year/next year with difficulty.

I'm looking for the paid route, because it's been a while since I've graduated and we've got two other uni fees plus a house extension to pay for right now. I considered teaching my degree subject so I could get the bursary but I actually prefer teaching History (I teach part-time).

Right now I feel a bit lost because the government has pulled out some of the funding for the paid teacher training route. I've called up the agencies I was with and they said it's unlikely to find a place right now, so I don't know what to do.

What are others doing? What could I do?
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JS9988
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I looked into the salaried route and found it a minefield and incredibly difficult to find. In the end I went for (and accepted a place) on a SCITT which has a great reputation and the staff are all lovely. I've checked with student finance who confirmed I can get the tuition covered and a maintenance loan regardless of my self funded MA and finance from my BA. But much like yourself it seems, we too have a mortgage to pay for and it's gonna be tight but workable.
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by ItsAnotherGrad)
Hey guys,

I've been trying to find a placement for teacher training for this year/next year with difficulty.

I'm looking for the paid route, because it's been a while since I've graduated and we've got two other uni fees plus a house extension to pay for right now. I considered teaching my degree subject so I could get the bursary but I actually prefer teaching History (I teach part-time).

Right now I feel a bit lost because the government has pulled out some of the funding for the paid teacher training route. I've called up the agencies I was with and they said it's unlikely to find a place right now, so I don't know what to do.

What are others doing? What could I do?
What's your degree subject?

Unfortunately, there's not really a motivation to put money into training history teachers right now, since the government is more than meeting its recruitment goals for history and they have plenty of applicants with a history degree and even a masters in history. If money is a concern, it might be more sensible to train in your degree subject.
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ItsAnotherGrad
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
What's your degree subject?

Unfortunately, there's not really a motivation to put money into training history teachers right now, since the government is more than meeting its recruitment goals for history and they have plenty of applicants with a history degree and even a masters in history. If money is a concern, it might be more sensible to train in your degree subject.
I did Creative Writing and English as my degree subject, and I currently teach History part-time unqualified.
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ItsAnotherGrad
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(Original post by JS9988)
I looked into the salaried route and found it a minefield and incredibly difficult to find. In the end I went for (and accepted a place) on a SCITT which has a great reputation and the staff are all lovely. I've checked with student finance who confirmed I can get the tuition covered and a maintenance loan regardless of my self funded MA and finance from my BA. But much like yourself it seems, we too have a mortgage to pay for and it's gonna be tight but workable.
Can you get the tuition covered if you haven't done a degree in the subject?
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Get into Teaching
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(Original post by ItsAnotherGrad)
Can you get the tuition covered if you haven't done a degree in the subject?
Hello ItsAnotherGrad

We are constantly hearing that there are very few School Direct (Salaried) and Post Graduate Teaching Apprenticeship courses being run this year. Another salaried option is Teach First courses, they begin in June and so do look into that swiftly as they will be filling their places.

If you are unable to train as an employee, you are able to apply for loans (irrespective of your degree subject or classification) to cover your cost of the tuition and for your maintenance. Further, if you have dependants, you are able to apply for grants for them, and if you have a disability, you may apply for the Disabled Students grant. It is also worth taking into account the reduction in council tax you may claim from your local authority and if you are in employment between April to Sept (when your teacher training course would begin), you may claim an income tax rebate on your salary up until becoming a student. Remember to also check with your chosen teacher training course provider offers a hardship fund too. Many people find that this amounts to similar to what you'd be earning on an employment-based teacher training course. (You are paid on the unqualified teachers pay scale, therefore the amount you earn is subject where in the country the school is.)

Teacher training is vocational in its nature and you need to practice and develop your teaching within two different schools to allow you to produce evidence of meeting the QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) standards. As a 'student' teacher, rather than employee, you'll be taking over someone else classes (and having their support during your training) rather than taking on your own classes, as you would as a trainee on an employment based option.

Wishing you all the best,

Jane
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by ItsAnotherGrad)
I did Creative Writing and English as my degree subject, and I currently teach History part-time unqualified.
If you have been working as an unqualified teacher for at least two years (presumably longer than two years if you're working part-time) then you may be suitable for the assessment-only route to QTS. I'm not entirely sure how it works, but something to look into perhaps.

As Jane's said, there's also TeachFirst (but I would expect they'd offer you English and not History) or just a normal route with student loans.
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ItsAnotherGrad
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
Hello ItsAnotherGrad

We are constantly hearing that there are very few School Direct (Salaried) and Post Graduate Teaching Apprenticeship courses being run this year. Another salaried option is Teach First courses, they begin in June and so do look into that swiftly as they will be filling their places.

If you are unable to train as an employee, you are able to apply for loans (irrespective of your degree subject or classification) to cover your cost of the tuition and for your maintenance. Further, if you have dependants, you are able to apply for grants for them, and if you have a disability, you may apply for the Disabled Students grant. It is also worth taking into account the reduction in council tax you may claim from your local authority and if you are in employment between April to Sept (when your teacher training course would begin), you may claim an income tax rebate on your salary up until becoming a student. Remember to also check with your chosen teacher training course provider offers a hardship fund too. Many people find that this amounts to similar to what you'd be earning on an employment-based teacher training course. (You are paid on the unqualified teachers pay scale, therefore the amount you earn is subject where in the country the school is.)

Teacher training is vocational in its nature and you need to practice and develop your teaching within two different schools to allow you to produce evidence of meeting the QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) standards. As a 'student' teacher, rather than employee, you'll be taking over someone else classes (and having their support during your training) rather than taking on your own classes, as you would as a trainee on an employment based option.

Wishing you all the best,

Jane
So from what I'm getting, to teach history on the unsalaried route, I can only apply for a loan and not get any bursary? (The disability/dependants doesn't apply to me). What is a hardship fund?

(Original post by bluebeetle)
If you have been working as an unqualified teacher for at least two years (presumably longer than two years if you're working part-time) then you may be suitable for the assessment-only route to QTS. I'm not entirely sure how it works, but something to look into perhaps.

As Jane's said, there's also TeachFirst (but I would expect they'd offer you English and not History) or just a normal route with student loans.
It's still early for a QTS from what I'm getting as prior to the role (this October), I've only tutored or worked with children in informal settings.

Teach First was one of the first things I applied to, but unfortunately, I didn't even get to choose the subject. They put me down for computing because I did an A-Level in ICT and there's a need for ICT teachers apparently.
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Get into Teaching
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(Original post by ItsAnotherGrad)
So from what I'm getting, to teach history on the unsalaried route, I can only apply for a loan and not get any bursary? (The disability/dependants doesn't apply to me). What is a hardship fund?
Hello ItsAnotherGrad

You are right, for the training period of Sept 2021 until summer 2022, there is no bursary for training to teach History.

A hardship fund is typically offered by universities to those who are suffering financial hardship during their studies. You would need to see how the individual Teacher Training course providers allow their students to apply for this, and if they have one.

You are correct about Teach First. They invite you to state a preference on what you learn to teach and in which geographical area, but they have the ultimate say in regards to these. However, it's worth noting that once awarded QTS, you may teach any subject.

Jane
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JS9988
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(Original post by ItsAnotherGrad)
Can you get the tuition covered if you haven't done a degree in the subject?
Yeah this has been confirmed to me by student finance and my BA subject was in Glass & Ceramics and MA in Glassmaking and I;m doing Primary Education. Completely different to being in art school for my degrees!
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