Sonnywilson
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Hi! I’m a grade 8/9 student , and I really want to study law at Oxford. I don’t know what a level would be best to do this out of history or economics. My two definite subjects are politics and English lit but some say Oxford likes 2 facilitating??? I probably prefer economics slightly , but I got an 8 in my last history test. Does anyone know what Oxford would prefer but balance this with me preferring economics ???
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FrankishEmpire
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You can do 4 A levels if you really want but I don't know how that would go with 4 writing subjects.
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jduxie4414
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(Original post by Sonnywilson)
Hi! I’m a grade 8/9 student , and I really want to study law at Oxford. I don’t know what a level would be best to do this out of history or economics. My two definite subjects are politics and English lit but some say Oxford likes 2 facilitating??? I probably prefer economics slightly , but I got an 8 in my last history test. Does anyone know what Oxford would prefer but balance this with me preferring economics ???
As the above said, you can take 4 subjects, but as those are all very intensive I would recommend against it. In my opinion history is the traditional choice, but you can link economics with your other two choices very nicely in your ps with how they represent different areas of a law degree, and it might be more relevant to your interests at the time.

Remember grades are not everything, you need to make sure you'll be willing to devote many hours of study into whichever you pick (I took GCSE French solely because I was targeted a 9, completely hated my life and ended up with a 7!). I believe both subjects are suitable for Oxford and whatever you do, I'm sure you're going to smash it!
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Pichi
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https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/unde...-jurisprudence

According to their website, there are no subject-specific entry requirements (unless you're studying the law of another country, e.g. Law with French Law obviously requires A-Level French). All it says is helpful (the green bubble) is having an essay subject, and English Literature, Politics, History and Economics are all essay subjects. That means you have the freedom to go for what you think you'll like. They even mention Philosophy as an example (on another site I read regarding Oxford and law), which isn't facilitating. And, as the user above said, economics is tied very closely to law in real life anyway (like corporate law), so you can use that to your advantage.
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Sonnywilson
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Oky thank you so much! From my own research I think history will benefit me more but I feel I will prefer economics so I might do that.... but I know Oxford prefer facilitating subjects so idk
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Sonnywilson)
Oky thank you so much! From my own research I think history will benefit me more but I feel I will prefer economics so I might do that.... but I know Oxford prefer facilitating subjects so idk
Neither Oxford nor any of the Russell Group (the originators of the term "facilitating subject") use that language any more as far as admissions go. Any traditionally academic subject, i.e. one that is primarily assessed by final unseen examination, will serve perfectly well to prepare you for a law degree. Both economics and history are equivalent in that regard and Oxford won't care whether you took one or the other. So pick whichever you find more interesting and/or think you can do better in overall.

If you were thinking that you may wish to pursue a history degree instead of law however, then history would normally be required. It is also typically preferred for related historical courses like the history or art or ancient history. Bear in mind you can go into both sides of law with any degree; to become a solicitor you just need a degree and to take the SQE (or will by the time you graduate), while to become a barrister you do need a qualifying law degree (QLD) but the Bar has no preference whether this is an LLB or a graduate diploma in law (GDL).

You could just as well study, say, Egyptology if that is your academic interest while wishing to go into legal profession! Of course you may find your academic interests more compelling than the drudgery of a legal career in the end, as certain other TSRians have found
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Sonnywilson
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Thank you so so much!!! Okay I feel much more secured
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Pichi
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Neither Oxford nor any of the Russell Group (the originators of the term "facilitating subject") use that language any more as far as admissions go. Any traditionally academic subject, i.e. one that is primarily assessed by final unseen examination, will serve perfectly well to prepare you for a law degree. Both economics and history are equivalent in that regard and Oxford won't care whether you took one or the other. So pick whichever you find more interesting and/or think you can do better in overall.

If you were thinking that you may wish to pursue a history degree instead of law however, then history would normally be required. It is also typically preferred for related historical courses like the history or art or ancient history. Bear in mind you can go into both sides of law with any degree; to become a solicitor you just need a degree and to take the SQE (or will by the time you graduate), while to become a barrister you do need a qualifying law degree (QLD) but the Bar has no preference whether this is an LLB or a graduate diploma in law (GDL).

You could just as well study, say, Egyptology if that is your academic interest while wishing to go into legal profession! Of course you may find your academic interests more compelling than the drudgery of a legal career in the end, as certain other TSRians have found
Adding on to this, I think the general concept of 'facilitating subjects' was abolished not too long ago because it led to the negligence of subjects that didn't fall under this category (https://www.tes.com/news/russell-gro...ating-subjects). Apparently this is why there are only really subject-specific requirements being asked for nowadays and the Oxford website doesn't list any essential subjects for studying law, so you're good.
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Sonnywilson
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Ur so helpful tysm omg
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