elokpo
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Hi all

I'm really interested in heading back to uni and studying to become a physiotherapist.
My previous undergrad degree is BSc Psych with Soc and I graduated in 2016.

Any advice on whether heading back to do the full Undergrad Physiotherapy course VS the MSc Pre-reg course? A lot of unis say they will accept a Psychology degree as entry requirements to the MSc but unsure whether I will be able to get my head around the course details enough? Or is it more like a shortened undergrad just named a MSc?

Any info would be amazing!
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kayhampto
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(Original post by elokpo)
Hi all

I'm really interested in heading back to uni and studying to become a physiotherapist.
My previous undergrad degree is BSc Psych with Soc and I graduated in 2016.

Any advice on whether heading back to do the full Undergrad Physiotherapy course VS the MSc Pre-reg course? A lot of unis say they will accept a Psychology degree as entry requirements to the MSc but unsure whether I will be able to get my head around the course details enough? Or is it more like a shortened undergrad just named a MSc?

Any info would be amazing!
Hi,

I'm in a similar position myself! I just graduated in July with a degree in Anatomy and am trying to make the same decision. I applied for MSc Physio pre-reg at Birmingham earlier this year (before I had finished my degree) and was put on the waiting list after an interview, but unfortunately didn't get a place in the end. I've sent off my UCAS (undergraduate/BSc) applications and am currently waiting for a response, but am also preparing my personal statement for MSc courses.

It's my understanding that the MSc is an accelerated course, so you complete the same amount of placement hours and learn similar content to the BSc. That being said, that makes the MSc more intense and there is a lot of self-study, particularly with the anatomy (so I've heard). Another difference with the MSc is that it is likely to have more research in first year (as opposed to just a dissertation in second year).

Both are pre-reg courses so you can qualify as a Physio with a BSc or an MSc, and they have to cover similar content so you actually know what you're talking about once you qualify, so I personally think the main difference is the pace/intensity of the course. For most BSc courses, you spend most of the first year studying anatomy and learning clinical skills etc, before starting placement in second year, but for the Master's they must have to condense the course, so spend less time teaching these/have more condensed modules on these subjects?

Having studied anatomy, I can say that it can be quite difficult to get your head around at first but you do get used to it and understand it more as you go on. Although there are some concepts to learn, it's mostly memorisation. If you think this is something you may struggle with, the extra year (i.e., BSc) may be worth considering as it gives you more time to grasp things? It might also help you settle back into university life and give you a chance to find your feet. I think the MSc is probably the better choice for me personally as I already have a good understanding of a major part already so I can focus more on the other topics they'll be delivering quickly, but most MSc courses accept anybody with a biological background so it can't be that bad or people would seriously struggle?

Not sure if you were aware, but I'm pretty certain you can also get full student finance (and the NHS bursary) for either the MSc or BSc, even if it is your second BSc, as it is a health profession that the NHS wants to hire more people of.

I'm definitely not an expert on this topic but thought I may as well share my thoughts as I'm in a similar position. Hope this helps a little bit and best of luck with your applications!!
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elokpo
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(Original post by kayhampto)
Hi,

I'm in a similar position myself! I just graduated in July with a degree in Anatomy and am trying to make the same decision. I applied for MSc Physio pre-reg at Birmingham earlier this year (before I had finished my degree) and was put on the waiting list after an interview, but unfortunately didn't get a place in the end. I've sent off my UCAS (undergraduate/BSc) applications and am currently waiting for a response, but am also preparing my personal statement for MSc courses.

It's my understanding that the MSc is an accelerated course, so you complete the same amount of placement hours and learn similar content to the BSc. That being said, that makes the MSc more intense and there is a lot of self-study, particularly with the anatomy (so I've heard). Another difference with the MSc is that it is likely to have more research in first year (as opposed to just a dissertation in second year).

Both are pre-reg courses so you can qualify as a Physio with a BSc or an MSc, and they have to cover similar content so you actually know what you're talking about once you qualify, so I personally think the main difference is the pace/intensity of the course. For most BSc courses, you spend most of the first year studying anatomy and learning clinical skills etc, before starting placement in second year, but for the Master's they must have to condense the course, so spend less time teaching these/have more condensed modules on these subjects?

Having studied anatomy, I can say that it can be quite difficult to get your head around at first but you do get used to it and understand it more as you go on. Although there are some concepts to learn, it's mostly memorisation. If you think this is something you may struggle with, the extra year (i.e., BSc) may be worth considering as it gives you more time to grasp things? It might also help you settle back into university life and give you a chance to find your feet. I think the MSc is probably the better choice for me personally as I already have a good understanding of a major part already so I can focus more on the other topics they'll be delivering quickly, but most MSc courses accept anybody with a biological background so it can't be that bad or people would seriously struggle?

Not sure if you were aware, but I'm pretty certain you can also get full student finance (and the NHS bursary) for either the MSc or BSc, even if it is your second BSc, as it is a health profession that the NHS wants to hire more people of.

I'm definitely not an expert on this topic but thought I may as well share my thoughts as I'm in a similar position. Hope this helps a little bit and best of luck with your applications!!
Ahh amazing thanks so much!! Deffo the information I was looking for - you're a dream!

Yeah it's definitely that weighing up of; is my brain ready to go fully into academics again / has my psych degree set me up enough / will I struggle and need that extra year. But thank you for the insight!

Good luck with yours
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