Throwaway927774
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Im thinking about being an astronomer and so i have heard that I need maths and physics and chemistry knowledge beforehand. Is it possible to take just maths and physics IGCSEs and leave the chemistry out of it?

Then I would take a physics A level so I would appreciate some info on if it’s likely they’ll have chemistry requirements

Then I’d take an astronomy course at uni and am wondering about the general requirements for that (if I’d need chemistry).

Just looking for people that are in uni and have gone through this process with physics. Thanks
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LuigiMario
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One foundation year option
https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/univer...1-780bde0aea72

13 other options....
https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/search...q%5D=Astronomy

Physics is quite important, the numbers are very big (hence maths) and astronomers have a different type of chemistry, they have Hydrogen, Helium - then all other elements are Metals!
but maybe geo?, they like a few sciences...read further....
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Throwaway927774
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
One foundation year option
https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/univer...1-780bde0aea72

13 other options....
https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/search...q%5D=Astronomy

Physics is quite important, the numbers are very big (hence maths) and astronomers have a different type of chemistry, they have Hydrogen, Helium - then all other elements are Metals!
but maybe geo?, they like a few sciences...read further....
I’m getting mixed replies like other people saying I don’t need to take chem at GCSE and a level since if I took astronomy they’d teach me all the chemistry I needed to learn
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LuigiMario
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Chem at GCSE , you can actually teach it to yourself!
I did most of my chem studies by working my way thru a Victorian book, rather extreme experiments, but simple.

I agree that astronomy/astrophysics would teach you everything that you need.
I have one mate studying astronomy at Bath uni, he’s really enjoying it.
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Throwaway927774
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Chem at GCSE , you can actually teach it to yourself!
I did most of my chem studies by working my way thru a Victorian book, rather extreme experiments, but simple.

I agree that astronomy/astrophysics would teach you everything that you need.
I have one mate studying astronomy at Bath uni, he’s really enjoying it.
I’m just wondering if a lack of chem knowledge would impact my GCSE and A level physics a lot. I’m not kidding when I said I literally know nothing about chemistry - not even the basics. I’ve completely forgotten them since I was at school
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Throwaway927774)
I’m just wondering if a lack of chem knowledge would impact my GCSE and A level physics a lot. I’m not kidding when I said I literally know nothing about chemistry - not even the basics. I’ve completely forgotten them since I was at school
Don't know so much how it relates specifically to the A-level or GCSE curricula in physics, but in general in a physics degrees (or astrophysics/astronomy degree, which are just "physics with some specific optional modules preselected" degrees essentially) will assume you have some general knowledge about atomic structure (i.e. nucleus of protons and neutrons surrounded by electrons), some notions of bonding (what different types of bonds are and the relative strengths of them), and some chemical-y aspects of material definitions (e.g. electron sea model of metals).

You also need to know a bit about nuclear processes which are sometimes covered on the chemistry side (e.g. fission/fusion, radioactive decay and half lives, types of ionising radiation; fusion stuff is particularly relevant to astronomy obviously with respect to stars), as well as how to generally look at the periodic table of elements and understand what the numbers and symbols mean. You won't generally be balancing chemical equations or needing to know much about the structure or nomenclature of organic molecules though, for example. Some understanding of trends of electronegativity across the periodic table might be useful but probably not essential.

A lot of what you do need to know will be at least indirectly referenced or taught in a physics course, but some of the detail may be assumed so you might need to read up on it if you haven't previously studied that. Note if you go into the planetary science side of things more than astronomy/astrophysics, you might need to know a bit more than just what is indicated above.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 month ago
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Throwaway927774
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Don't know so much how it relates specifically to the A-level or GCSE curricula in physics, but in general in a physics degrees (or astrophysics/astronomy degree, which are just "physics with some specific optional modules preselected" degrees essentially) will assume you have some general knowledge about atomic structure (i.e. nucleus of protons and neutrons surrounded by electrons), some notions of bonding (what different types of bonds are and the relative strengths of them), and some chemical-y aspects of material definitions (e.g. electron sea model of metals).

You also need to know a bit about nuclear processes which are sometimes covered on the chemistry side (e.g. fission/fusion, radioactive decay and half lives, types of ionising radiation; fusion stuff is particularly relevant to astronomy obviously with respect to stars), as well as how to generally look at the periodic table of elements and understand what the numbers and symbols mean. You won't generally be balancing chemical equations or needing to know much about the structure or nomenclature of organic molecules though, for example. Some understanding of trends of electronegativity across the periodic table might be useful but probably not essential.

A lot of what you do need to know will be at least indirectly referenced or taught in a physics course, but some of the detail may be assumed so you might need to read up on it if you haven't previously studied that. Note if you go into the planetary science side of things more than astronomy/astrophysics, you might need to know a bit more than just what is indicated above.
Bummer. I don’t have time to take chemistry as well
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LuigiMario
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Check the factual entry requirements at some actual universities, you might find some that don’t need an overt chem qualification
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Throwaway927774
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Check the factual entry requirements at some actual universities, you might find some that don’t need an overt chem qualification
Yeah they might not but I’d still need to know some stuff like the other person said. It’s like cheating in an exam then getting a job related to your ‘great grade’ but finding yourself having no clue what to do on the job or how to do it.
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LuigiMario
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Not really, I can see what you mean, but the universities are very careful when they write things in their prospectus - uni’s are very big business , with nearly 40,000 students just in the city of Manchester, generating (approx) fees of £400M per year. So when you check out, say,
https://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/under...-astrophysics/
Entry requirements
Your application, especially your personal statement, should demonstrate your enthusiasm for studying physics. This might include relevant reading, voluntary or work experience, areas of interest from your current studies or other relevant extra-curricular and co-curricular activities.

You will need a strong performance in both Mathematics and Physics as part of your entry qualifications” nary a mention of Periodic Table, elements etc, alchemy.

And the text is legally definitive. By all means buy some used Chem A level books on AMZN for 5pence (I did, and one of them still had an A-level interactive CD-Rom) that was plenty of revision ( was doing an EU baccalaureate, was cross reading A-level text books for fun)

Looking further on Bath website:- “AAA in three A levels including Mathematics and Physics plus one of:

grade A in an EPQ
grade B in the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate
grade A in AS level Further Mathematics (except if you are studying an A level in that subject)
grade B in a fourth A level, where your four A levels include A level Further Mathematics
if you are eligible, a pass in the Access to Bath course or successful completion of another recognised widening access programme


again No Chem!

There is a bit of chemistry/physics inside this (randomly chosen) uni course, but that will be where they teach it to you, or help you to study it yourself...

Year 2
http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/202...h/PH20016.html
[read this page, very detailed Modules on nuclear physics/chemistry]
(which is just applied Physics) and other someModules might mention “hydrogen” occasionally

don’t be worried, if you can do chem, ok, if you don’t know it - then choose one of the universities that might match your grades, that doesn’t need A or GCSE chem. (I think most uni’s need GCSE English & maths) (again there are a few exceptions to that, such as Lincoln)
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Throwaway927774
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Not really, I can see what you mean, but the universities are very careful when they write things in their prospectus - uni’s are very big business , with nearly 40,000 students just in the city of Manchester, generating (approx) fees of £400M per year. So when you check out, say,
https://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/under...-astrophysics/
Entry requirements
Your application, especially your personal statement, should demonstrate your enthusiasm for studying physics. This might include relevant reading, voluntary or work experience, areas of interest from your current studies or other relevant extra-curricular and co-curricular activities.

You will need a strong performance in both Mathematics and Physics as part of your entry qualifications” nary a mention of Periodic Table, elements etc, alchemy.

And the text is legally definitive. By all means buy some used Chem A level books on AMZN for 5pence (I did, and one of them still had an A-level interactive CD-Rom) that was plenty of revision ( was doing an EU baccalaureate, was cross reading A-level text books for fun)

Looking further on Bath website:- “AAA in three A levels including Mathematics and Physics plus one of:

grade A in an EPQ
grade B in the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate
grade A in AS level Further Mathematics (except if you are studying an A level in that subject)
grade B in a fourth A level, where your four A levels include A level Further Mathematics
if you are eligible, a pass in the Access to Bath course or successful completion of another recognised widening access programme


again No Chem!

There is a bit of chemistry/physics inside this (randomly chosen) uni course, but that will be where they teach it to you, or help you to study it yourself...

Year 2
http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/202...h/PH20016.html
[read this page, very detailed Modules on nuclear physics/chemistry]
(which is just applied Physics) and other someModules might mention “hydrogen” occasionally

don’t be worried, if you can do chem, ok, if you don’t know it - then choose one of the universities that might match your grades, that doesn’t need A or GCSE chem. (I think most uni’s need GCSE English & maths) (again there are a few exceptions to that, such as Lincoln)
Lol I’ve no clue what I’m looking at there. So much stuff!
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Throwaway927774
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Not really, I can see what you mean, but the universities are very careful when they write things in their prospectus - uni’s are very big business , with nearly 40,000 students just in the city of Manchester, generating (approx) fees of £400M per year. So when you check out, say,
https://www.bath.ac.uk/courses/under...-astrophysics/
Entry requirements
Your application, especially your personal statement, should demonstrate your enthusiasm for studying physics. This might include relevant reading, voluntary or work experience, areas of interest from your current studies or other relevant extra-curricular and co-curricular activities.

You will need a strong performance in both Mathematics and Physics as part of your entry qualifications” nary a mention of Periodic Table, elements etc, alchemy.

And the text is legally definitive. By all means buy some used Chem A level books on AMZN for 5pence (I did, and one of them still had an A-level interactive CD-Rom) that was plenty of revision ( was doing an EU baccalaureate, was cross reading A-level text books for fun)

Looking further on Bath website:- “AAA in three A levels including Mathematics and Physics plus one of:

grade A in an EPQ
grade B in the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate
grade A in AS level Further Mathematics (except if you are studying an A level in that subject)
grade B in a fourth A level, where your four A levels include A level Further Mathematics
if you are eligible, a pass in the Access to Bath course or successful completion of another recognised widening access programme


again No Chem!

There is a bit of chemistry/physics inside this (randomly chosen) uni course, but that will be where they teach it to you, or help you to study it yourself...

Year 2
http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/202...h/PH20016.html
[read this page, very detailed Modules on nuclear physics/chemistry]
(which is just applied Physics) and other someModules might mention “hydrogen” occasionally

don’t be worried, if you can do chem, ok, if you don’t know it - then choose one of the universities that might match your grades, that doesn’t need A or GCSE chem. (I think most uni’s need GCSE English & maths) (again there are a few exceptions to that, such as Lincoln)
Also I’m looking to go for an access to HE course, so, to clarify, I’d need to take an access course for both maths and physics ?
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