hussain-bukhari
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Hey guys,

I'm Hussain, a first year medical student studying in the UK.
I'm new to the student room!

I'm here to help you guys with any queries/worries/concerns you might have with the applications process, and if you just want to have a general chat about what it's like studying Medicine that's cool too.

Feel free to private message, I'll try and reply back to everyone on the thread and through messages when I can!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I found that thestudentroom was a cool resource when I was applying to study medicine, so thought I'd help you guys out where I can.

Just remember I'm just a first year medical student. Not an admissions tutor, teacher or doctor so if I can't answer something, I'll redirect (or try to) to someone who can.
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ecolier
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(Original post by hussain-bukhari)
Hey guys,

I'm Hussain, a first year medical student studying in the UK.
I'm new to the student room!
Excellent.

Start with answering some Qs on this thread please: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6748260
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hussain-bukhari
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(Original post by ecolier)
Excellent.

Start with answering some Qs on this thread please: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6748260
Great!
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tinygirl96
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What qualities and skills are recommended for potential applicants? Describe a typical day at work. Explain why the growth mindset is vital to medicine. Tell me more about the more challenging parts of working in medicine.
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ecolier
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(Original post by tinygirl96)
What qualities and skills are recommended for potential applicants? Describe a typical day at work. Explain why the growth mindset is vital to medicine. Tell me more about the more challenging parts of working in medicine.
Hmm I don't know if OP will be able to answer all of that. But let's see.

(Original post by hussain-bukhari)
...Not an admissions tutor, teacher or doctor so if I can't answer something, I'll redirect (or try to) to someone who can.
P.S. I am all of these so feel free to tag me if you run into difficulties.
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hussain-bukhari
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(Original post by tinygirl96)
What qualities and skills are recommended for potential applicants? Describe a typical day at work. Explain why the growth mindset is vital to medicine. Tell me more about the more challenging parts of working in medicine.
Hey tinygirl96,

There's a lot of skills that medical schools are looking for. When applying I found it extremley useful to go through each universities' website, a lot of universities will explicitly have a section where they mention the skills they're looking for in prospective students: e.g. leadership, resiliance, motivation and empathy.

For a more comprehensive look, see this document by the Medical Schools Council: https://www.medschools.ac.uk/media/2...y-medicine.pdf

Speaking more generally, applicants should have a strong understanding of what medicine actually involves. I think that is probably the most important thing, admissions tutors/ interviewers are really good at gauging whether or not an applicant knows what they're getting themselves in to.

- Try to get work experience in a caring role /carehome (I know this is difficult right now)
- Speak to doctors / medical students about their experiences
- There's also some pretty cool series on BBC iPlayer that follow experienced doctors and give an insight into the job: I'd recommend giving 'Surgeons: At the Edge of Life' a watch.


As ecolier said, I can't really help you with your other questions because I'm not a doctor
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ecolier
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(Original post by hussain-bukhari)
...
Very good answer :congrats:
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aspiringdoctor02
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Hi, what have you covered so far in year 1?
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Spinning2Sucess
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Hi Hussain, i know this thread was more for people that are currently apply for medicine but maybe you could help me too. Im currently university student too but finding it hard to keep up with all the content that is being taught. How are you finding it? Any advise for me to get back on track? Also, I am finding it hard to study and keep up with my lecturers through microsoft teams. How are you finding it?
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hussain-bukhari
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Hi aspiringdoctor02!

We've been covering the human life cycle this semester inc. pregnancy, chromosomal abnormalities, bone development, puberty, immune system and cancer + looking into Down's syndrome, CF, HIV - just to name a few.

For anatomy, we've covered the male/female pelvis + reproductive systems and muscles + bones of the upper limb.

This is really summarised :beard:
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hussain-bukhari
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(Original post by Spinning2Sucess)
Hi Hussain, i know this thread was more for people that are currently apply for medicine but maybe you could help me too. Im currently university student too but finding it hard to keep up with all the content that is being taught. How are you finding it? Any advise for me to get back on track? Also, I am finding it hard to study and keep up with my lecturers through microsoft teams. How are you finding it?
Good to hear from you.

One thing that helps me keep up with the content being delivered is doing a bit of pre-reading on the weekend. Also, make sure you do a good amount of work each day, don't leave it all for a specific day/weekend.

It might be useful for you to structure your day/revision around your lectures, try to attend every lecture where possible and make brief notes whilst the lecture is going on. At the end of the day, say you had 3 lectures - try to consolidate what you've learnt/covered through the brief notes you've made.

If you have access to recorded lectures after they've been delivered live, it's hugely useful to work through them at your own pace.
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tinygirl96
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Very informative response
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username5442900
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1. Did you do bmat or ucat? What score did you get? And how did you prepare for them?
2. What do you wish you knew before starting med school?
3. Is medicine a lot harder than a levels?
4. What is your favourite topic so far?

(Sorry for asking many questions 😅)
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hussain-bukhari
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(Original post by DSKE010)
1. Did you do bmat or ucat? What score did you get? And how did you prepare for them?
2. What do you wish you knew before starting med school?
3. Is medicine a lot harder than a levels?
4. What is your favourite topic so far?

(Sorry for asking many questions 😅)
Hi, thanks for your questions.

1.) What exam I sat and what I scored:

I sat the UCAT, scored 680 (2720) SJT B1

My advice:

I think the best way to revise is to simulate the exam environment. So, timed conditions and done on the computer.
That's why I like Medify so much since its mocks are the closest thing to the actual UCAT exam (other than UCATs own official mocks).
I would give yourself 3-4 weeks ideally to go through practise questions.
In the last couple of weeks before your exam work through 1 Medify complete mock (2 hours) per day.

2.) What I wish I knew before starting medical school:

Workload:
You often hear about the workload at medical school being absolutely crazy and almost unmanageable. I found that this does have some truth to it, but only if you don't organise yourself properly - and by properly I mean getting the relevant work done at the specified time. The quicker you realise how to manage your time, the smoother the transition to the more intense workload will be. I came into medical school from a gap year, so as you can imagine, I was raring to go - and developing basic time management skills early has helped me enjoy the course a lot more.

Time commitment:
Another thing that I wish I had known was the amount of time your studies detract from your day. Some days almost the whole of your waking hours are dedicated to study, and on more typical days it does seem like you work 'harder' than a lot of your none medic friends. That being said I can't understate the importance of a healthy work-life balance.

At the end of the day, it's understandable why medicine requires so much of your time and energy - you are training to become a doctor, and the health and well-being of people is 'in your hands'.

3. Is medicine a lot harder than A-levels?

That's a difficult question for me. In the moment you do feel that your A-level studies are all-encompassing and difficult, it's only after the fact that you can look back and say "actually that wasn't all that bad" don't get me wrong - I wouldn't go back. 😂

So is medical school harder?
Short answer: yes.
Long answer: I wouldn't compare it with A-levels, it's so much more immersive, involved and inspiring. I go to a PBL based medical school, so in a week we work towards understanding health and pathology in a specific case, we then attend anatomy labs and learn the relevant anatomy and throughout the week our personal learning is supplemented by case-specific lectures. Not to mention the histology, BSS and other branches of learning that you go through each week. Now to compare that with A-levels I think is quite difficult, but it's a lot more work for sure but also a lot more fun.

4.) What is my favourite topic so far:

I love anatomy. Especially through software like Complete Anatomy that allows you to see in 3D and AR the whole human composition.
Also, I really like clinical skills. Specifically in-clinic communication skills - learning how to interact and speak with patients it can be quite awkward at times but navigating through conversations with simulated patients has been a real learning experience.
Learning about actual conditions is also really something that makes you realise "Woah I'm doing medicine".



Now a quick disclaimer:
- this is my experience and unfortunately I can't say all medical students have this experience of medical school.
- I'm only a first-year medical student.
- I came into medicine from a very crazy gap year, so my experience may not be reflective.
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hussain-bukhari
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DSKE010, hope the above response helps.

If you need any other help or have any other queries just drop a reply in the thread or private message me.
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username5442900
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hussain-bukhari Thank you so much for your detailed answer! And good luck with your medical journey!
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Cherrygrape1234
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(Original post by hussain-bukhari)
Hey guys,

I'm Hussain, a first year medical student studying in the UK.
I'm new to the student room!

I'm here to help you guys with any queries/worries/concerns you might have with the applications process, and if you just want to have a general chat about what it's like studying Medicine that's cool too.

Feel free to private message, I'll try and reply back to everyone on the thread and through messages when I can!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I found that thestudentroom was a cool resource when I was applying to study medicine, so thought I'd help you guys out where I can.

Just remember I'm just a first year medical student. Not an admissions tutor, teacher or doctor so if I can't answer something, I'll redirect (or try to) to someone who can.
Hi hussain-bukhari
What did you get in your a-levels and GCSEs?
And how did you revise (especially for GCSE mocks)

Hope to hear from you
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Emma Watson7946
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(Original post by hussain-bukhari)
Hey guys,

I'm Hussain, a first year medical student studying in the UK.
I'm new to the student room!

I'm here to help you guys with any queries/worries/concerns you might have with the applications process, and if you just want to have a general chat about what it's like studying Medicine that's cool too.

Feel free to private message, I'll try and reply back to everyone on the thread and through messages when I can!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I found that thestudentroom was a cool resource when I was applying to study medicine, so thought I'd help you guys out where I can.

Just remember I'm just a first year medical student. Not an admissions tutor, teacher or doctor so if I can't answer something, I'll redirect (or try to) to someone who can.
Hey if you don’t mind telling, which med school are you currently studying?
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Emma Watson7946
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For me I think a level are harder than med because I just don’t like applying things. Currently doesn’t mean always, so probably my perspective will change
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hussain-bukhari
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(Original post by Cherrygrape1234)
Hi hussain-bukhari
What did you get in your a-levels and GCSEs?
And how did you revise (especially for GCSE mocks)

Hope to hear from you
Hi, thanks for your questions.

Also, no problems I'm here to be transparent:

GCSEs: 3A*s 6As 1B ≈ two grade 9s, one grade 8, six grade 7s, one grade 6.

A-levels: A*BB (Psychology, Biology Chemistry)
Note: I was unable to resit my exams because of the cancellations and my sixth form was unwilling to assist resit students. A lot of my friends missed their medicine places because of this. At the time I held all offers where I interviewed.

Predicted grades for A-level resit: A*A (Biology, Chemistry).

UCAT: 2720 SJT B1.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Just realised I missed the second question:

The best way to revise for GCSEs is to work through past papers, do this slowly - so at the beginning you can answer past paper questions open-book, but as it gets closer to your exams do full past papers in timed conditions.

This will simulate the exam environment and get you used to the exam format.

Past paper questions are excellent because you learn how the exam board likes to phrase certain questions and what they're looking for in responses.

Make sure you go through the mark scheme for every question you do no matter how easy it seems. This'll help you spot trends aswell.
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