Cupcakes1234567
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Does anyone have any good book recommendations for someone interested in psychiatry? I'm a 1st year medical student btw
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tufftybluey
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Does anyone have any good book recommendations for someone interested in psychiatry? I'm a 1st year medical student btw
Psychiatry P.R.N by Sarah Stringer combines theory with OSCE tips, relatable to real life patients.
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Psychiatry P.R.N by Sarah Stringer combines theory with OSCE tips, relatable to real life patients.
Thank you!
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Angury
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What type of books are you looking for? More for general interest / books aimed at the general public or more theoretical and aimed towards doctors?
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What type of books are you looking for? More for general interest / books aimed at the general public or more theoretical and aimed towards doctors?
More general interest but I don't mind theoretical
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Angury
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Does anyone have any good book recommendations for someone interested in psychiatry? I'm a 1st year medical student btw

Right, prepare to be spammed.



Spoiler:
Show


Theoretical:

Sims Symptoms of the Mind by Femi Oyebode
Popular book for psychiatry trainees preparing for exams. However, I think it’s a very well-written book that covers the mental state examination and common psychopathology in a very clear and reflective manner with case examples as well as examples from literature.



Psychiatric interviewing and assessment by Rob Poole
Another excellent book that is aimed at psychiatry trainees (and medical students) but is also well written and encourages you to perceive mental disorders from the patients perspective.

I mention both as rather than being dry psychiatry textbooks, they both offer an overview of psychiatry that is reflective and compassionate.



History:

A History of Psychiatry: From the Era of the Asylum to the Age of Prozac by Edward Shorter

Madness in civilisation by Anthony Scull

Madness: a brief history by Roy Porter
Our Sympathetic Shadow by Tom Burns


If you are interested in reading about the History of Psychiatry, the above tend to be the most popular. Reading about the history of psychiatry also gives you a clearer idea about how our current services work and why we are more biological in our current practise. Out of the three, I think Roy Porter & Tom Burns are the best. Scull’s offers a more anthropological and philosophical perspective and I wasn’t a big fan of Shorter’s as I thought it was quite superficial but any of my colleagues enjoyed it.



Psychotherapy:
Loves Executioner and other tales of psychotherapy by Yalom
The art of psychotherapy by Anthony Storr
Solitude: a return to the self by Anthony Storr
The undiscovered self by Carl Jung

Not sure if you’re interested in Psychotherapy but it is a part of psychiatry training and the books I’ve highlighted above do broaden your understanding of mental illness (imo). Loves Executioner offers brief chapters on the types of patients who come to psychotherapy and what psychotherapy can do for them which might be a good place to start if you’re unsure if psychotherapy is something you’d be interested in reading about. Anthony Storr is one of my favourite psychotherapy authors; his books are well written, easy to understand and thought-provoking. Out of all the famous psychotherapists, I find Jung the easiest to read. The Undiscovered Self is not so much about psychiatry or mental illness as it is about Jung’s own theories and ones personality, but it is an interesting historical read and I think his ideas are still very relevant today.



Other:
Doctoring the Mind: Is our current treatment of mental illness really any good? By Richard Bentall
Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature

Mind, Modernity, Madness by Liah Greenfield

The myth of mental illness by Thomas Szasz

Cracked: why psychiatry is doing more harm than good by David James



Bentall is a professor of clinical psychology who writes a lot about a non-biological perspective of mental illness and the dangers of an increasingly pathologized society. Although I don’t agree with all of his arguments, I think he offers an interesting perspective on psychiatry and mental illness in general and he makes good, well-researched arguments. You can also listen to him make some of his arguments which I will mention below.

The last two books, particularly Szasz, are well known ‘anti psychiatry’ books. I think The myth of mental illness is a worthwhile read in particular. While I disagree with most of Szasz’s arguments (as do I imagine many individuals working in mental health), I think it is helpful to understand his arguments in their historical context and what led to the anti-psychiatry movement as well as the increasing biological takeover by psychiatry and its potential consequences.



Fiction:

The death of ivan ilych by Leo Tolstory
Mount misery by Samuel Shem
The sorrows of young Werther by Goethe

Bell jar by Sylvia Plath



The above are not specific to Psychiatry but I believe can tell you a lot about disorders of the human mind. You may have heard of Samuel Shem’s more popular book, The House of God, that is a somewhat satirical take on working as a junior doctor in the USA. Mounty Misery is his not so well-known book following a junior doctor in Psychiatry. It is hilarious to read and emphasizes the various stereotypes within Psychiatry and the patients we treat.





General nonfiction:

The denial of death by Ernest Becker

Illness by Havi Carel

A fortunate man: the story of a Country doctor by John Berger


Again, the above are not specific to Psychiatry but I believe cover psychiatry, mental illness and mental health in a very reflective and thought-provoking manner. A fortunate man is one of my all-time favourite books; it follows a GP working in the UK in 1966 and is a fascinating insight into the psychology of a small community and how they perceive their family doctor.



Philosophy:
The philosophy of psychiatry: a companion by Jennifer Radden

I have a lot of recommendations for philosophy and psychiatry but as I’m unsure of your level of interest, I’ve highlighted just one. This book offers an overview of philosophical enquiries within psychiatry including our diagnostic criteria, the various mental disorders and our role as psychiatrists within society. This book is very easy to read and very stimulating. If you are interested in this area, let me know your particular interests and I am happy to give more recommendations. If you’re unsure, I’d recommend giving this book a read.



Autobiographies:
Night Falls Fast & An Unquiet Mind By Kay Jamison
Mans search for meaning by Viktor Frankl
Darkness Visible by William Styron
Intoxicated by my illness by Anatole Broyard
A noonday demon: an atlas of depression by Andrew Solomon
The journal of a disappointed man by WNP Barbellion



Lots of autobiographies out there written by people who have suffered from and continue to suffer from mental illness. The ones listed above are the ones that I think are the most well-written and interesting to read. Depends on your interests in this area and what you’re looking for really. Solomon also has some excellent TED talks that you can watch for free online.







Books I haven’t read:

Everyday gets a little closer: a twice-told therapy by Yalom

The psychotic wavelength by Richard Lucas

Hunger A memoir of my Body by Roxanne Gay

The heartland: finding and losing schizophrenia by Nathan Filer

Confessions of an English opium-eater by Thomas de Quincey

Revolution in psychiatry: the new understanding of man by Ernest Becker

The one by Paul Reed

A Mind that found itself by Clifford Beers

Suicidal mind by Edwin Shneidman

How I stayed alive when my brain was trying to kill by Susan Rose

Psychiatry in context: experience, meaning and communities by Philip Thomas

Prozac nation by Elizabeth Wurtel

Models of madness by John Read

The integrity of the personality by Anthony Storr

Heaven and hell: psychology of the emotions by Neel Burton

The eden express by Mark Vonnegut

Essays on the history of psychiatry by Anthony Scull

Social suffering & rethinking psychiatry, Patients and Healers & Context of Culture by Arthur Kleinman

Voices of reason by Ivan Leudar

Accepting voices by Marius Romme

Anatomy of an epidemic by Robert Whitaker

Asylums by Erving Goffman

Suicide prohibition by Thomas Szasz

The language of madness by David Cooper

Living with depression by Deborah Eerani

The savage god by Alvarez Al

November of the soul by George Howe

In house of dreams and glass by Robert Ikitzman

A mood apart by PeterWwhybrow

Listening to Prozac by Peter Kramer

The meaning of madness by Neel Burton



Above is the long list of books of psychiatry & mental illness that are on my TBR. I cannot account for their writing style or how good they are, but they have all been recommended to me. They are a mixture of autobiographies of psychiatrists and patients, history books, fiction, philosophy and anthropology. If anything captures your eye I’m happy to discuss it further.



Finally, there are a lot of excellent, online resources. In particular I would recommend two.

Firstly, this fantastic TED talk by Eleanor Longden, a woman who started having auditory hallucinations in university. She describes her experiences and a very different approach to psychosis which is slowly gaining traction amongst some psychiatrists. Also an excellent way to understand what it’s like to be someone hearing voices – would highly recommend:

https://www.ted.com/talks/eleanor_lo...ad?language=en



Finally, there is a website called IAITV that offers free videos of debates on a number of topics including psychiatry. It includes philosophers, psychologists, psychiatrists, patients and academics. They cover some very relevant topics including stigma of psychiatry, mental illness in the modern day and the validity and meaning of psychiatric diagnoses.

Below is one example with Bentall who is a psychologist and academic and is one of the authors I recommended above which discusses another way to think of mental disorders:

https://iai.tv/video/against-psychia...tall-interview







Apologies for the ridiculously long list. As I’m unsure what specifically interests you (perhaps you don’t know yourself!), I’ve given a general outline and haven't really covered in detail what each book is about and why I have recommended it. If there are any books that catch your eye I'm happy to discuss them in more detail and why I think they are worth reading.


Also, if there are any particular areas you would like to read more about, let me know and I’m happy to give recommendations on not only books but also videos, articles and debates.

Enjoy!
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becausethenight
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Right, prepare to be spammed.



Spoiler:
Show


Theoretical:

Sims Symptoms of the Mind by Femi Oyebode
Popular book for psychiatry trainees preparing for exams. However, I think it’s a very well-written book that covers the mental state examination and common psychopathology in a very clear and reflective manner with case examples as well as examples from literature.



Psychiatric interviewing and assessment by Rob Poole
Another excellent book that is aimed at psychiatry trainees (and medical students) but is also well written and encourages you to perceive mental disorders from the patients perspective.

I mention both as rather than being dry psychiatry textbooks, they both offer an overview of psychiatry that is reflective and compassionate.



History:

A History of Psychiatry: From the Era of the Asylum to the Age of Prozac by Edward Shorter

Madness in civilisation by Anthony Scull

Madness: a brief history by Roy Porter
Our Sympathetic Shadow by Tom Burns


If you are interested in reading about the History of Psychiatry, the above tend to be the most popular. Reading about the history of psychiatry also gives you a clearer idea about how our current services work and why we are more biological in our current practise. Out of the three, I think Roy Porter & Tom Burns are the best. Scull’s offers a more anthropological and philosophical perspective and I wasn’t a big fan of Shorter’s as I thought it was quite superficial but any of my colleagues enjoyed it.



Psychotherapy:
Loves Executioner and other tales of psychotherapy by Yalom
The art of psychotherapy by Anthony Storr
Solitude: a return to the self by Anthony Storr
The undiscovered self by Carl Jung

Not sure if you’re interested in Psychotherapy but it is a part of psychiatry training and the books I’ve highlighted above do broaden your understanding of mental illness (imo). Loves Executioner offers brief chapters on the types of patients who come to psychotherapy and what psychotherapy can do for them which might be a good place to start if you’re unsure if psychotherapy is something you’d be interested in reading about. Anthony Storr is one of my favourite psychotherapy authors; his books are well written, easy to understand and thought-provoking. Out of all the famous psychotherapists, I find Jung the easiest to read. The Undiscovered Self is not so much about psychiatry or mental illness as it is about Jung’s own theories and ones personality, but it is an interesting historical read and I think his ideas are still very relevant today.



Other:
Doctoring the Mind: Is our current treatment of mental illness really any good? By Richard Bentall
Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature

Mind, Modernity, Madness by Liah Greenfield

The myth of mental illness by Thomas Szasz

Cracked: why psychiatry is doing more harm than good by David James



Bentall is a professor of clinical psychology who writes a lot about a non-biological perspective of mental illness and the dangers of an increasingly pathologized society. Although I don’t agree with all of his arguments, I think he offers an interesting perspective on psychiatry and mental illness in general and he makes good, well-researched arguments. You can also listen to him make some of his arguments which I will mention below.

The last two books, particularly Szasz, are well known ‘anti psychiatry’ books. I think The myth of mental illness is a worthwhile read in particular. While I disagree with most of Szasz’s arguments (as do I imagine many individuals working in mental health), I think it is helpful to understand his arguments in their historical context and what led to the anti-psychiatry movement as well as the increasing biological takeover by psychiatry and its potential consequences.



Fiction:

The death of ivan ilych by Leo Tolstory
Mount misery by Samuel Shem
The sorrows of young Werther by Goethe

Bell jar by Sylvia Plath



The above are not specific to Psychiatry but I believe can tell you a lot about disorders of the human mind. You may have heard of Samuel Shem’s more popular book, The House of God, that is a somewhat satirical take on working as a junior doctor in the USA. Mounty Misery is his not so well-known book following a junior doctor in Psychiatry. It is hilarious to read and emphasizes the various stereotypes within Psychiatry and the patients we treat.





General nonfiction:

The denial of death by Ernest Becker

Illness by Havi Carel

A fortunate man: the story of a Country doctor by John Berger


Again, the above are not specific to Psychiatry but I believe cover psychiatry, mental illness and mental health in a very reflective and thought-provoking manner. A fortunate man is one of my all-time favourite books; it follows a GP working in the UK in 1966 and is a fascinating insight into the psychology of a small community and how they perceive their family doctor.



Philosophy:
The philosophy of psychiatry: a companion by Jennifer Radden

I have a lot of recommendations for philosophy and psychiatry but as I’m unsure of your level of interest, I’ve highlighted just one. This book offers an overview of philosophical enquiries within psychiatry including our diagnostic criteria, the various mental disorders and our role as psychiatrists within society. This book is very easy to read and very stimulating. If you are interested in this area, let me know your particular interests and I am happy to give more recommendations. If you’re unsure, I’d recommend giving this book a read.



Autobiographies:
Night Falls Fast & An Unquiet Mind By Kay Jamison
Mans search for meaning by Viktor Frankl
Darkness Visible by William Styron
Intoxicated by my illness by Anatole Broyard
A noonday demon: an atlas of depression by Andrew Solomon
The journal of a disappointed man by WNP Barbellion



Lots of autobiographies out there written by people who have suffered from and continue to suffer from mental illness. The ones listed above are the ones that I think are the most well-written and interesting to read. Depends on your interests in this area and what you’re looking for really. Solomon also has some excellent TED talks that you can watch for free online.







Books I haven’t read:

Everyday gets a little closer: a twice-told therapy by Yalom

The psychotic wavelength by Richard Lucas

Hunger A memoir of my Body by Roxanne Gay

The heartland: finding and losing schizophrenia by Nathan Filer

Confessions of an English opium-eater by Thomas de Quincey

Revolution in psychiatry: the new understanding of man by Ernest Becker

The one by Paul Reed

A Mind that found itself by Clifford Beers

Suicidal mind by Edwin Shneidman

How I stayed alive when my brain was trying to kill by Susan Rose

Psychiatry in context: experience, meaning and communities by Philip Thomas

Prozac nation by Elizabeth Wurtel

Models of madness by John Read

The integrity of the personality by Anthony Storr

Heaven and hell: psychology of the emotions by Neel Burton

The eden express by Mark Vonnegut

Essays on the history of psychiatry by Anthony Scull

Social suffering & rethinking psychiatry, Patients and Healers & Context of Culture by Arthur Kleinman

Voices of reason by Ivan Leudar

Accepting voices by Marius Romme

Anatomy of an epidemic by Robert Whitaker

Asylums by Erving Goffman

Suicide prohibition by Thomas Szasz

The language of madness by David Cooper

Living with depression by Deborah Eerani

The savage god by Alvarez Al

November of the soul by George Howe

In house of dreams and glass by Robert Ikitzman

A mood apart by PeterWwhybrow

Listening to Prozac by Peter Kramer

The meaning of madness by Neel Burton



Above is the long list of books of psychiatry & mental illness that are on my TBR. I cannot account for their writing style or how good they are, but they have all been recommended to me. They are a mixture of autobiographies of psychiatrists and patients, history books, fiction, philosophy and anthropology. If anything captures your eye I’m happy to discuss it further.



Finally, there are a lot of excellent, online resources. In particular I would recommend two.

Firstly, this fantastic TED talk by Eleanor Longden, a woman who started having auditory hallucinations in university. She describes her experiences and a very different approach to psychosis which is slowly gaining traction amongst some psychiatrists. Also an excellent way to understand what it’s like to be someone hearing voices – would highly recommend:

https://www.ted.com/talks/eleanor_lo...ad?language=en



Finally, there is a website called IAITV that offers free videos of debates on a number of topics including psychiatry. It includes philosophers, psychologists, psychiatrists, patients and academics. They cover some very relevant topics including stigma of psychiatry, mental illness in the modern day and the validity and meaning of psychiatric diagnoses.

Below is one example with Bentall who is a psychologist and academic and is one of the authors I recommended above which discusses another way to think of mental disorders:

https://iai.tv/video/against-psychia...tall-interview






Apologies for the ridiculously long list. As I’m unsure what specifically interests you (perhaps you don’t know yourself!), I’ve given a general outline and haven't really covered in detail what each book is about and why I have recommended it. If there are any books that catch your eye I'm happy to discuss them in more detail and why I think they are worth reading.


Also, if there are any particular areas you would like to read more about, let me know and I’m happy to give recommendations on not only books but also videos, articles and debates.

Enjoy!
Not OP (also 1st year med), but this looks fantastic :heart:
I've read some of these (shoutout to Love's Executioner) but I'm definitely going to check the rest out, especially the "textbook" ones since it'll be nice to have stuff in a bit more of a medical context I think.
If you don't mind, have you read anything with a sociology or legal focus that you thought was interesting?
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Angury
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Not OP (also 1st year med), but this looks fantastic :heart:
I've read some of these (shoutout to Love's Executioner) but I'm definitely going to check the rest out, especially the "textbook" ones since it'll be nice to have stuff in a bit more of a medical context I think.
If you don't mind, have you read anything with a sociology or legal focus that you thought was interesting?

Regarding law and sociology, I have another long list (sorry!). These are the books that have had most of an impact on me:



Cultural:

Madness and modernism by Louis Sass

Outsiders: Studies in Sociology of Deviance by Howard Becker

Violence: A Public Health Menace and a Public Health Approach by Sandra Bloom
Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems and Practice by Annie Bartlett

Introducing Levi Strauss and Structural Anthropology
Anthropological Approaches to Psychological Medicine: Crossing Bridges by Vieda Skultans

The Society of the Spectacle by Guy Debord

Dangerous People: Policy, Prediction and Practice by Bernadette McSherry

Structural Anthropology by Claude Levi-Strauss

Psychiatry in Context: Experience, Meaning & Communities by Philip Thomas

The Public Value of the Social Sciences: An Interpretive Essay by John Brewer

On the Sociology of Medicine & Civilization and Disease by Henry Sigerist

Subjectivity: Ethnographic Investigations by Joao Biehl
Soteria by Loren Mosher
Limits to Medicine: Medical Nemesis, The Expropriation by Ivan Illich

Narrative Based Medicine by Tisha Greenhalgh

Aylums: Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates by Erving Goffman
Exploring Medical Anthropology by Donald Joralemon
Mind, Modernity, Madness: The Impact of Culture on Human Experience by Liah Greenfeld
Steps to an Ecology of Mind: Collected Essays in Anthropology, Psychiatry, Evolution and Epistemology by Gregory Bateson

Suicide: A Study in Sociology by Emile Durkheim
The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine by James Le Fanu



I’ve given a broad list as there are a lot of different aspects of medical anthropology. A good starting place is The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine by Le Fanu and Limits to Medicine by Illich which are well written, easy to follow and will give you an idea of what you want to read about further. Of the mental health anthropology books, I would say the best writer is Arthur Kleinman.



Books by Arthur Kleinman:
Social Suffering
Writing at the Margin: Discourse between Anthropology and Medicine
Patients and Healers in the Context of Culture: An exploration of the borderland between Anthropology, Medicine and Psychiatry
Deep China: The Moral Life of the Person, What Anthropology and Psychiatry Tell Us about China Today
Pain as Human Experience: An Anthropological Perspective

Culture and Depression: Studies in the Anthropology and Cross-Cultural Psychiatry of Affect and Disorder



As you can see, Kleinman writes a lot about mental illness and anthropology. He is a fantastic writer and his books are interspersed by case studies which illustrate his points beautifully. If you are interested in this area, I would highly recommend starting with Arthur Kleinman.



I’m also thrilled to hear you are interested in Law. I am actually undertaking postgraduate studies in Mental Health Law at the moment so have a lot to say about the topic! Below are some books about mental health law to get you started.



Law:
Human rights: a very short introduction by Andrew Clapham

Dignity, mental health and human rights: coercion and the law by Brendan Kelly

Mental Illness, Human Rights and the Law by Brendan Kelly
New Medicalism by John Fanning



I’m not sure which other legal books to recommend as most of them are quite ‘dry.’ Is there any particular area you’re interested in e.g. human rights, jurisprudence, mental capacity, negligence etc?



Alex Keene is a barrister who writes on recent case law and updates on Mental Capacity Law in a way that is easy to understand:

https://www.mentalcapacitylawandpolicy.org.uk/



He also offers a mini-series of videos that cover the Mental Capacity Act, Mental Health Act and how one balances welfare and autonomy:

https://www.mentalcapacitylawandpoli....uk/shedinars/



Lucy Series is a legal academic who writes about autonomy, deprivation of liberty and human rights within a medical context, again in an easy to understand way:

https://thesmallplaces.wordpress.com/



Hope I haven’t overwhelmed you. I’d love to hear books that you’ve read that have perked your interest!
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becausethenight
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Regarding law and sociology, I have another long list (sorry!).
Don't apologise, this looks so interesting Christmas list sorted
These are the books that have had most of an impact on me:



Cultural:

Madness and modernism by Louis Sass

Outsiders: Studies in Sociology of Deviance by Howard Becker

Violence: A Public Health Menace and a Public Health Approach by Sandra Bloom
Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems and Practice by Annie Bartlett

Introducing Levi Strauss and Structural Anthropology
Anthropological Approaches to Psychological Medicine: Crossing Bridges by Vieda Skultans

The Society of the Spectacle by Guy Debord

Dangerous People: Policy, Prediction and Practice by Bernadette McSherry

Structural Anthropology by Claude Levi-Strauss

Psychiatry in Context: Experience, Meaning & Communities by Philip Thomas

The Public Value of the Social Sciences: An Interpretive Essay by John Brewer

On the Sociology of Medicine & Civilization and Disease by Henry Sigerist

Subjectivity: Ethnographic Investigations by Joao Biehl
Soteria by Loren Mosher
Limits to Medicine: Medical Nemesis, The Expropriation by Ivan Illich

Narrative Based Medicine by Tisha Greenhalgh

Aylums: Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates by Erving Goffman
Exploring Medical Anthropology by Donald Joralemon
Mind, Modernity, Madness: The Impact of Culture on Human Experience by Liah Greenfeld
Steps to an Ecology of Mind: Collected Essays in Anthropology, Psychiatry, Evolution and Epistemology by Gregory Bateson

Suicide: A Study in Sociology by Emile Durkheim
The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine by James Le Fanu



I’ve given a broad list as there are a lot of different aspects of medical anthropology. A good starting place is The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine by Le Fanu and Limits to Medicine by Illich which are well written, easy to follow and will give you an idea of what you want to read about further. Of the mental health anthropology books, I would say the best writer is Arthur Kleinman.





Books by Arthur Kleinman:
Social Suffering
Writing at the Margin: Discourse between Anthropology and Medicine
Patients and Healers in the Context of Culture: An exploration of the borderland between Anthropology, Medicine and Psychiatry
Deep China: The Moral Life of the Person, What Anthropology and Psychiatry Tell Us about China Today
Pain as Human Experience: An Anthropological Perspective

Culture and Depression: Studies in the Anthropology and Cross-Cultural Psychiatry of Affect and Disorder



As you can see, Kleinman writes a lot about mental illness and anthropology. He is a fantastic writer and his books are interspersed by case studies which illustrate his points beautifully. If you are interested in this area, I would highly recommend starting with Arthur Kleinman.
Thanks, it's especially useful to have starting points as (my experience at least) is that it's easy to be interested and hard to find more 'academic' starting points that are readable. I used to just grab stuff from the school library but uni libraries feel less browsable.

I’m also thrilled to hear you are interested in Law. I am actually undertaking postgraduate studies in Mental Health Law at the moment so have a lot to say about the topic! Below are some books about mental health law to get you started.
A postgrad in Mental Health Law sounds awesome! Can I ask what you're doing and kind of how you got there?



Law:
Human rights: a very short introduction by Andrew Clapham

Dignity, mental health and human rights: coercion and the law by Brendan Kelly

Mental Illness, Human Rights and the Law by Brendan Kelly
New Medicalism by John Fanning



I’m not sure which other legal books to recommend as most of them are quite ‘dry.’ Is there any particular area you’re interested in e.g. human rights, jurisprudence, mental capacity, negligence etc?
Yeah, this sort of thing can be really 'dry'.
I guess I haven't read enough to really know what I'm interested in but essentially how law interacts with medical practice (as if that's not incredibly broad) and maybe more of a 'legal' perspective on medicine? Sorry if that's too vague.
We've been looking at capacity and negligence in lectures which I did find pretty interesting.



Alex Keene is a barrister who writes on recent case law and updates on Mental Capacity Law in a way that is easy to understand:

https://www.mentalcapacitylawandpolicy.org.uk/



He also offers a mini-series of videos that cover the Mental Capacity Act, Mental Health Act and how one balances welfare and autonomy:

https://www.mentalcapacitylawandpoli....uk/shedinars/



Lucy Series is a legal academic who writes about autonomy, deprivation of liberty and human rights within a medical context, again in an easy to understand way:

https://thesmallplaces.wordpress.com/



Hope I haven’t overwhelmed you. I’d love to hear books that you’ve read that have perked your interest!
I'm not overwhelmed, I'm quite excited

Most of what I've read that made me interested is on your previous list already :rofl:
I really enjoyed Dr Yalom's work and his insights into clinical practice on a deeper level, and I found Doctoring the Mind: Is our current treatment of mental illness really any good? interesting but I wasn't sure how much I agreed with it! It was thought-provoking though and I think it made me realise how much there is to think about in medicine and in mental health. I also did an extended essay on psychiatry and women that was mainly based on Mad, Bad And Sad: A History of Women and the Mind Doctors from 1800 to the Present by Lisa Appignanesi which was massive but which really helped me centre some of the historical context.

As part of my Philosophy Pre-U (=A level) we discussed Durkheim, Freud, and Jung and had a little bit of sociology and anthropology in the syllabus which I really wanted to learn more about but couldn't find anywhere to get started that didn't seem overly academic and inaccessible, or too "basic". I've enjoyed reading about Foucault and Szasz, but didn't quite dare go near the texts on my own
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Angury
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Don't apologise, this looks so interesting Christmas list sorted


Thanks, it's especially useful to have starting points as (my experience at least) is that it's easy to be interested and hard to find more 'academic' starting points that are readable. I used to just grab stuff from the school library but uni libraries feel less browsable.



A postgrad in Mental Health Law sounds awesome! Can I ask what you're doing and kind of how you got there?





Yeah, this sort of thing can be really 'dry'.
I guess I haven't read enough to really know what I'm interested in but essentially how law interacts with medical practice (as if that's not incredibly broad) and maybe more of a 'legal' perspective on medicine? Sorry if that's too vague.
We've been looking at capacity and negligence in lectures which I did find pretty interesting.





I'm not overwhelmed, I'm quite excited

Most of what I've read that made me interested is on your previous list already :rofl:
I really enjoyed Dr Yalom's work and his insights into clinical practice on a deeper level, and I found Doctoring the Mind: Is our current treatment of mental illness really any good? interesting but I wasn't sure how much I agreed with it! It was thought-provoking though and I think it made me realise how much there is to think about in medicine and in mental health. I also did an extended essay on psychiatry and women that was mainly based on Mad, Bad And Sad: A History of Women and the Mind Doctors from 1800 to the Present by Lisa Appignanesi which was massive but which really helped me centre some of the historical context.

As part of my Philosophy Pre-U (=A level) we discussed Durkheim, Freud, and Jung and had a little bit of sociology and anthropology in the syllabus which I really wanted to learn more about but couldn't find anywhere to get started that didn't seem overly academic and inaccessible, or too "basic". I've enjoyed reading about Foucault and Szasz, but didn't quite dare go near the texts on my own
I agree, Yalom is an excellent writer. I think his book, Existential Psychotherapy probably had the biggest impact on me, and the concepts raised in that book are ones that I still use when speaking to patients today. One thing I like about his writing is that it's rarely abstract; you can apply his ideas both to yourself and your patients. Psychoanalysis is an area I find particularly fascinating and is a very different way of thinking of mental health that I am increasingly finding to be relevant to both my patients and myself. Jessica Yakely (Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist & Psychotherapist) has written a few, short articles on the topic of emotional intelligence amongst medical students and psychoanalytic training which you may find interesting (you should have free access via your medical school):

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...052-X/fulltext

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...5D4CCB3F2BCB0E

I really like Bentall's work, particularly his debates and speeches. I also don't agree with all of his opinions, but his work really opened my eyes to non-medical perspectives on mental illness. He is quite a regular speaker and is involved in a lot of events so you could easily attend one of his speeches/debates once the pandemic is over.

Your essay sounds very interesting! The treatment of women within Psychiatry is something I have become increasingly interested in (I am currently working in a forensics unit for women with 'challenging behaviour'). I've really started to appreciate how much of an impact our culture and expectations of women (including unconscious beliefs) have an impact on how women perceive themselves and display their emotions. There was an excellent book that was released this year by psychologist Jessica Taylor provocatively titled 'Why Women are Blamed for Everything: Exploring Victim Blaming of Women Subjected to Abuse and Trauma' which explores her PhD thesis while offering case studies, empirical evidence and well-argued discussions on how women who go through trauma are perceived and judged in our society. I learnt a lot from that book.

I agree with you, I found Foucault incredibly difficult and had to give up trying to read his work. However, I actually found Szasz easy to read; I would definitely recommend trying his work. You may disagree with may of his arguments, but I think his position is very important to understand when we think about how patients and psychiatrists perceive themselves today. I also think Erving Goffman's Asylums is a very important text for both Psychiatry and Anthropology.

Regarding looking at medical law, the Medical Law review journal is a good place to start. The journal covers current cases and their impact on medical practice as well as the legal factors. The articles are always well written and explain the concepts well (although you may need to do some googling at times). Some examples of articles you may be interested in include:

https://academic.oup.com/medlaw/arti...searchresult=1
The impact of one particular case (Montgomery) on medical negligence and how society now expects doctors to deliver patient-centered care rather than paternalistic input.

https://academic.oup.com/medlaw/arti...searchresult=1
https://academic.oup.com/medlaw/arti...dFrom=fulltext
Two articles that coves the concept of 'best interests' within the Mental Capacity Act and what it actually means for respecting the values and beliefs of our patients.

Regarding my own studies, I completed an LLM in Mental Health Law when I was doing my F1, F2 & CT1 jobs and am just about to start a PhD in Mental Health Law & International Human Rights Law(!)

Like yourself, I became interested in this area in medical school after receiving some interesting lectures but mainly when I started working as an F1 and started questioning the paternalistic nature of our current practice. One think I particularly enjoy in my legal studies is the different approach that is taken; it's a completely different way of thinking of things compared to Medicine and I find myself becoming a more critically analytical thinker but also having greater awareness for my patients rights (especially important as I work in secure services) and how our societies views impact on human rights legislation.

At the moment, I think you're off to a great start. Do a lot of wide reading and take in as many opinions, perspectives and views as you can. Then you can start to develop your own opinions and think about how things should be different!
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becausethenight
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I agree, Yalom is an excellent writer. I think his book, Existential Psychotherapy probably had the biggest impact on me, and the concepts raised in that book are ones that I still use when speaking to patients today. One thing I like about his writing is that it's rarely abstract; you can apply his ideas both to yourself and your patients. Psychoanalysis is an area I find particularly fascinating and is a very different way of thinking of mental health that I am increasingly finding to be relevant to both my patients and myself. Jessica Yakely (Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist & Psychotherapist) has written a few, short articles on the topic of emotional intelligence amongst medical students and psychoanalytic training which you may find interesting (you should have free access via your medical school):

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...052-X/fulltext

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...5D4CCB3F2BCB0E
I appreciate his writing style a lot, his books are a joy to read. I haven't read Existential Psychotherapy (mostly as it seemed aimed at clinicians :lol:) but it looks like one I want to get to sooner rather that later (before placement?)

Psychoanalysis is having a bit of a resurgence, isn't it

I really like Bentall's work, particularly his debates and speeches. I also don't agree with all of his opinions, but his work really opened my eyes to non-medical perspectives on mental illness. He is quite a regular speaker and is involved in a lot of events so you could easily attend one of his speeches/debates once the pandemic is over.
I'll keep an eye out for sure :yep: He's amazingly prolific.

Your essay sounds very interesting! The treatment of women within Psychiatry is something I have become increasingly interested in (I am currently working in a forensics unit for women with 'challenging behaviour'). I've really started to appreciate how much of an impact our culture and expectations of women (including unconscious beliefs) have an impact on how women perceive themselves and display their emotions. There was an excellent book that was released this year by psychologist Jessica Taylor provocatively titled 'Why Women are Blamed for Everything: Exploring Victim Blaming of Women Subjected to Abuse and Trauma' which explores her PhD thesis while offering case studies, empirical evidence and well-argued discussions on how women who go through trauma are perceived and judged in our society. I learnt a lot from that book.
I had one idea I was pleased with and then the essay suffered from "written up in one manic binge before the internal deadline" so
I'd read the Bell Jar and was struck by some of the similarities with young women I knew in 2019, so it was fascinating to research, though. The book you mention sounds pretty harrowing, but I'm keen to have a look - it feels like something that gets discussed but often not in depth (if that makes sense)

My med school did have a lecture on unconscious bias and cultural expectations, but I don't think many people turned up!

I would be really interested to hear more about your work at the moment if that's OK - how are you finding the forensics unit? Can you apply these kinds of sociological insights to your practice?

I agree with you, I found Foucault incredibly difficult and had to give up trying to read his work. However, I actually found Szasz easy to read; I would definitely recommend trying his work. You may disagree with may of his arguments, but I think his position is very important to understand when we think about how patients and psychiatrists perceive themselves today. I also think Erving Goffman's Asylums is a very important text for both Psychiatry and Anthropology.
Thanks, that's encouraging! Having a look there are several of his books in the library; I'm guessing "The myth of mental illness : foundations of a theory of personal conduct" is the one to start with?


Regarding looking at medical law, the Medical Law review journal is a good place to start. The journal covers current cases and their impact on medical practice as well as the legal factors. The articles are always well written and explain the concepts well (although you may need to do some googling at times). Some examples of articles you may be interested in include:

https://academic.oup.com/medlaw/arti...searchresult=1
The impact of one particular case (Montgomery) on medical negligence and how society now expects doctors to deliver patient-centered care rather than paternalistic input.

https://academic.oup.com/medlaw/arti...searchresult=1
https://academic.oup.com/medlaw/arti...dFrom=fulltext
Two articles that coves the concept of 'best interests' within the Mental Capacity Act and what it actually means for respecting the values and beliefs of our patients.
I'll have a plough through those, thanks Any tips for reading legal articles, if they're needed?


Regarding my own studies, I completed an LLM in Mental Health Law when I was doing my F1, F2 & CT1 jobs and am just about to start a PhD in Mental Health Law & International Human Rights Law(!)
:eek: that's so cool!
This might sound very silly, but does that mean that you're a lawyer as well? I assume not?

How difficult was it to combine a LLM with FY/CT1? We have obligatory intercalation so I was thinking of maybe intercalating in something law/social science related, but it's a long way off obviously.

Like yourself, I became interested in this area in medical school after receiving some interesting lectures but mainly when I started working as an F1 and started questioning the paternalistic nature of our current practice. One think I particularly enjoy in my legal studies is the different approach that is taken; it's a completely different way of thinking of things compared to Medicine and I find myself becoming a more critically analytical thinker but also having greater awareness for my patients rights (especially important as I work in secure services) and how our societies views impact on human rights legislation.
Sounds really interesting It's nice to hear from someone who isn't doing lab science and that you feel it's relevant to your practice - I'd never heard of anyone doing that before except with educational stuff (but I am a first year )

At the moment, I think you're off to a great start. Do a lot of wide reading and take in as many opinions, perspectives and views as you can. Then you can start to develop your own opinions and think about how things should be different!
:ta: I'm looking forward to reading more, especially with a bit of structure/guidance!
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Right, prepare to be spammed.



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Theoretical:

Sims Symptoms of the Mind by Femi Oyebode
Popular book for psychiatry trainees preparing for exams. However, I think it’s a very well-written book that covers the mental state examination and common psychopathology in a very clear and reflective manner with case examples as well as examples from literature.



Psychiatric interviewing and assessment by Rob Poole
Another excellent book that is aimed at psychiatry trainees (and medical students) but is also well written and encourages you to perceive mental disorders from the patients perspective.

I mention both as rather than being dry psychiatry textbooks, they both offer an overview of psychiatry that is reflective and compassionate.



History:

A History of Psychiatry: From the Era of the Asylum to the Age of Prozac by Edward Shorter

Madness in civilisation by Anthony Scull

Madness: a brief history by Roy Porter
Our Sympathetic Shadow by Tom Burns


If you are interested in reading about the History of Psychiatry, the above tend to be the most popular. Reading about the history of psychiatry also gives you a clearer idea about how our current services work and why we are more biological in our current practise. Out of the three, I think Roy Porter & Tom Burns are the best. Scull’s offers a more anthropological and philosophical perspective and I wasn’t a big fan of Shorter’s as I thought it was quite superficial but any of my colleagues enjoyed it.



Psychotherapy:
Loves Executioner and other tales of psychotherapy by Yalom
The art of psychotherapy by Anthony Storr
Solitude: a return to the self by Anthony Storr
The undiscovered self by Carl Jung

Not sure if you’re interested in Psychotherapy but it is a part of psychiatry training and the books I’ve highlighted above do broaden your understanding of mental illness (imo). Loves Executioner offers brief chapters on the types of patients who come to psychotherapy and what psychotherapy can do for them which might be a good place to start if you’re unsure if psychotherapy is something you’d be interested in reading about. Anthony Storr is one of my favourite psychotherapy authors; his books are well written, easy to understand and thought-provoking. Out of all the famous psychotherapists, I find Jung the easiest to read. The Undiscovered Self is not so much about psychiatry or mental illness as it is about Jung’s own theories and ones personality, but it is an interesting historical read and I think his ideas are still very relevant today.



Other:
Doctoring the Mind: Is our current treatment of mental illness really any good? By Richard Bentall
Madness Explained: Psychosis and Human Nature

Mind, Modernity, Madness by Liah Greenfield

The myth of mental illness by Thomas Szasz

Cracked: why psychiatry is doing more harm than good by David James



Bentall is a professor of clinical psychology who writes a lot about a non-biological perspective of mental illness and the dangers of an increasingly pathologized society. Although I don’t agree with all of his arguments, I think he offers an interesting perspective on psychiatry and mental illness in general and he makes good, well-researched arguments. You can also listen to him make some of his arguments which I will mention below.

The last two books, particularly Szasz, are well known ‘anti psychiatry’ books. I think The myth of mental illness is a worthwhile read in particular. While I disagree with most of Szasz’s arguments (as do I imagine many individuals working in mental health), I think it is helpful to understand his arguments in their historical context and what led to the anti-psychiatry movement as well as the increasing biological takeover by psychiatry and its potential consequences.



Fiction:

The death of ivan ilych by Leo Tolstory
Mount misery by Samuel Shem
The sorrows of young Werther by Goethe

Bell jar by Sylvia Plath



The above are not specific to Psychiatry but I believe can tell you a lot about disorders of the human mind. You may have heard of Samuel Shem’s more popular book, The House of God, that is a somewhat satirical take on working as a junior doctor in the USA. Mounty Misery is his not so well-known book following a junior doctor in Psychiatry. It is hilarious to read and emphasizes the various stereotypes within Psychiatry and the patients we treat.





General nonfiction:

The denial of death by Ernest Becker

Illness by Havi Carel

A fortunate man: the story of a Country doctor by John Berger


Again, the above are not specific to Psychiatry but I believe cover psychiatry, mental illness and mental health in a very reflective and thought-provoking manner. A fortunate man is one of my all-time favourite books; it follows a GP working in the UK in 1966 and is a fascinating insight into the psychology of a small community and how they perceive their family doctor.



Philosophy:
The philosophy of psychiatry: a companion by Jennifer Radden

I have a lot of recommendations for philosophy and psychiatry but as I’m unsure of your level of interest, I’ve highlighted just one. This book offers an overview of philosophical enquiries within psychiatry including our diagnostic criteria, the various mental disorders and our role as psychiatrists within society. This book is very easy to read and very stimulating. If you are interested in this area, let me know your particular interests and I am happy to give more recommendations. If you’re unsure, I’d recommend giving this book a read.



Autobiographies:
Night Falls Fast & An Unquiet Mind By Kay Jamison
Mans search for meaning by Viktor Frankl
Darkness Visible by William Styron
Intoxicated by my illness by Anatole Broyard
A noonday demon: an atlas of depression by Andrew Solomon
The journal of a disappointed man by WNP Barbellion



Lots of autobiographies out there written by people who have suffered from and continue to suffer from mental illness. The ones listed above are the ones that I think are the most well-written and interesting to read. Depends on your interests in this area and what you’re looking for really. Solomon also has some excellent TED talks that you can watch for free online.







Books I haven’t read:

Everyday gets a little closer: a twice-told therapy by Yalom

The psychotic wavelength by Richard Lucas

Hunger A memoir of my Body by Roxanne Gay

The heartland: finding and losing schizophrenia by Nathan Filer

Confessions of an English opium-eater by Thomas de Quincey

Revolution in psychiatry: the new understanding of man by Ernest Becker

The one by Paul Reed

A Mind that found itself by Clifford Beers

Suicidal mind by Edwin Shneidman

How I stayed alive when my brain was trying to kill by Susan Rose

Psychiatry in context: experience, meaning and communities by Philip Thomas

Prozac nation by Elizabeth Wurtel

Models of madness by John Read

The integrity of the personality by Anthony Storr

Heaven and hell: psychology of the emotions by Neel Burton

The eden express by Mark Vonnegut

Essays on the history of psychiatry by Anthony Scull

Social suffering & rethinking psychiatry, Patients and Healers & Context of Culture by Arthur Kleinman

Voices of reason by Ivan Leudar

Accepting voices by Marius Romme

Anatomy of an epidemic by Robert Whitaker

Asylums by Erving Goffman

Suicide prohibition by Thomas Szasz

The language of madness by David Cooper

Living with depression by Deborah Eerani

The savage god by Alvarez Al

November of the soul by George Howe

In house of dreams and glass by Robert Ikitzman

A mood apart by PeterWwhybrow

Listening to Prozac by Peter Kramer

The meaning of madness by Neel Burton



Above is the long list of books of psychiatry & mental illness that are on my TBR. I cannot account for their writing style or how good they are, but they have all been recommended to me. They are a mixture of autobiographies of psychiatrists and patients, history books, fiction, philosophy and anthropology. If anything captures your eye I’m happy to discuss it further.



Finally, there are a lot of excellent, online resources. In particular I would recommend two.

Firstly, this fantastic TED talk by Eleanor Longden, a woman who started having auditory hallucinations in university. She describes her experiences and a very different approach to psychosis which is slowly gaining traction amongst some psychiatrists. Also an excellent way to understand what it’s like to be someone hearing voices – would highly recommend:

https://www.ted.com/talks/eleanor_lo...ad?language=en



Finally, there is a website called IAITV that offers free videos of debates on a number of topics including psychiatry. It includes philosophers, psychologists, psychiatrists, patients and academics. They cover some very relevant topics including stigma of psychiatry, mental illness in the modern day and the validity and meaning of psychiatric diagnoses.

Below is one example with Bentall who is a psychologist and academic and is one of the authors I recommended above which discusses another way to think of mental disorders:

https://iai.tv/video/against-psychia...tall-interview






Apologies for the ridiculously long list. As I’m unsure what specifically interests you (perhaps you don’t know yourself!), I’ve given a general outline and haven't really covered in detail what each book is about and why I have recommended it. If there are any books that catch your eye I'm happy to discuss them in more detail and why I think they are worth reading.


Also, if there are any particular areas you would like to read more about, let me know and I’m happy to give recommendations on not only books but also videos, articles and debates.

Enjoy!
Wow thank you so much!
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Angury
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(Original post by becausethenight)
I would be really interested to hear more about your work at the moment if that's OK - how are you finding the forensics unit? Can you apply these kinds of sociological insights to your practice?

I love working in Forensics - it's what I want to do long-term. As a tertiary service we have a lot of resources that General Adult unfortunately do not have. We also have the luxury of time which means we can do (what I would call) 'real' psychiatry. We spend a lot of time exploring our patient's background, their relationships, their upbringing etc. There is a greater emphasis on psychosocial management rather than just prescribing antipsychotics (usually because of the risk to the public) and as a result, each patients treatment plan is unique to them.

I also love the legal side of it. I find Mental Health Law fascinating, and it is a big part of the job. You're involved in writing court reports and giving oral evidence, tribunals, prison assessments, custody reviews as well as working with non-medical organisations like Multi-Agency Professional Panel Agencies and the Ministry of Justice. It's interesting to work with other organisations and balance the risk to the public with your patients right to confidentiality.



(Original post by becausethenight)
Thanks, that's encouraging! Having a look there are several of his books in the library; I'm guessing "The myth of mental illness : foundations of a theory of personal conduct" is the one to start with?
I'd say Myth of Mental Illness would be the best place to start. It's his most famous book and imo a precipitant of the anti-psychiatry movement so important to understand and also easy to read.



(Original post by becausethenight)
I'll have a plough through those, thanks Any tips for reading legal articles, if they're needed?
I guess if the articles I sent you don't make sense, maybe have a read around certain concepts or the case first. Google is your friend. There are a lot of non-legal friendly websites that offer overviews and analysis of recent cases (including the two blogs I linked - especially Alex's) that provide critique of recent case law within mental health & capacity that are easy to understand. They also encourage you to think about the different ways that law professionals view the mental health & capacity laws compared to clinicians i.e. theoretical vs practical, and how these cases may change the way patients are treated. A good example is the case of Montgomery that led to the GMC changing their guidance to doctors about gaining consent from patients:

https://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2224

https://www.gmc-uk.org/ethical-guida...ery--judgement

https://rcpsg.ac.uk/college/this-is-...ontgomery-case


(Original post by becausethenight)
:eek: that's so cool!
This might sound very silly, but does that mean that you're a lawyer as well? I assume not?

How difficult was it to combine a LLM with FY/CT1? We have obligatory intercalation so I was thinking of maybe intercalating in something law/social science related, but it's a long way off obviously.
To work as a solicitor you have to undertake the LPC which is usually a year-long course and to become a barrister you have to undertake the bar exam etc, which I haven't done. So I'm just studying law as an amateur academic for fun I guess.

It actually wasn't that difficult balancing the LLM with work. I think I had a very supportive F1 and F2 year and my experience seems to be very different from those I've read on TSR. It was busy at times with on-calls etc, but I always left on time and I never brought my work home with me. I guess it's all about deciding what's important to you and how you want to spend your free time.
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becausethenight
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I love working in Forensics - it's what I want to do long-term. As a tertiary service we have a lot of resources that General Adult unfortunately do not have. We also have the luxury of time which means we can do (what I would call) 'real' psychiatry. We spend a lot of time exploring our patient's background, their relationships, their upbringing etc. There is a greater emphasis on psychosocial management rather than just prescribing antipsychotics (usually because of the risk to the public) and as a result, each patients treatment plan is unique to them.

I also love the legal side of it. I find Mental Health Law fascinating, and it is a big part of the job. You're involved in writing court reports and giving oral evidence, tribunals, prison assessments, custody reviews as well as working with non-medical organisations like Multi-Agency Professional Panel Agencies and the Ministry of Justice. It's interesting to work with other organisations and balance the risk to the public with your patients right to confidentiality.
Thanks, it sounds like a really interesting career path!



I'd say Myth of Mental Illness would be the best place to start. It's his most famous book and imo a precipitant of the anti-psychiatry movement so important to understand and also easy to read.
Thanks, I'll wait for that to come off loan





I guess if the articles I sent you don't make sense, maybe have a read around certain concepts or the case first. Google is your friend. There are a lot of non-legal friendly websites that offer overviews and analysis of recent cases (including the two blogs I linked - especially Alex's) that provide critique of recent case law within mental health & capacity that are easy to understand. They also encourage you to think about the different ways that law professionals view the mental health & capacity laws compared to clinicians i.e. theoretical vs practical, and how these cases may change the way patients are treated. A good example is the case of Montgomery that led to the GMC changing their guidance to doctors about gaining consent from patients:

https://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2224

https://www.gmc-uk.org/ethical-guida...ery--judgement

https://rcpsg.ac.uk/college/this-is-...ontgomery-case
The BMJ article is much easier to read (because it's providing the context :rofl:) - thanks!




To work as a solicitor you have to undertake the LPC which is usually a year-long course and to become a barrister you have to undertake the bar exam etc, which I haven't done. So I'm just studying law as an amateur academic for fun I guess.

It actually wasn't that difficult balancing the LLM with work. I think I had a very supportive F1 and F2 year and my experience seems to be very different from those I've read on TSR. It was busy at times with on-calls etc, but I always left on time and I never brought my work home with me. I guess it's all about deciding what's important to you and how you want to spend your free time.
Ah I see Sounds more fun than just being a lawyer

It's reassuring to hear that you managed to balance both, normally you just hear horror stories about how busy FY doctors are!
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