Which University and course is suitable for me?

Watch
Ahnaf17
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
I have the following A level subjects physics, maths and further maths. And I live in Manchester. Haven’t received my predicted grades but I’d say the grades will be AAA/AAB/ABB. I also have interest in astrophysics, music and psychology. Is there anyone who can help me choose a suitable course in a good Uni based on these info? I really need help since I’m a distant learner. And also, can I study psychology as an A level maths and physics student?
0
reply
AndyChow
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
When in doubt, computer science. (Just a popular suggestion, don't quote me)


P.S just look at graduate employment rate. Those information are widely available online.
If the vast majority of graduates goes into "Retail, catering & services" / "progressed to further education" then I'd be very careful about investing £50k and 3 years of my life in.

P.S.2 #6 is the correct answer
Last edited by AndyChow; 1 month ago
1
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Psychology degrees typically just require or prefer one or more STEM subjects at A-level, although physics is maybe less immediately relevant than biology you will importantly be familiar with the same scientific practices. So you should be fine with those subjects going into a psychology degree for admissions purposes.

I would note that above suggestion of computer science is quite glib and not even that helpful if we are to understand it as presumably a suggestion on the best "graduate outcomes". I would note that CS grads have such poor graduate prospects in the UK the government commissioned two inquiries into the matter.

You also see very many grads of such courses who thought they could simply turn up to lectures for 3 years and learn to code and they would be handed a job at the end; this is not true. Graduate employers in the computing sector will put far more importance on relevant work experience, what kinds of programming projects you've done and how you've documented them as a portfolio of sorts on GitHub or similar.

So the glib suggestion of "do CS/learn to code" doesn't actually really help.
2
reply
AndyChow
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I would note that CS grads have such poor graduate prospects in the UK the government commissioned two inquiries into the matter.

You also see very many grads of such courses who thought they could simply turn up to lectures for 3 years and learn to code and they would be handed a job at the end; this is not true. Graduate employers in the computing sector will put far more importance on relevant work experience, what kinds of programming projects you've done and how you've documented them as a portfolio of sorts on GitHub or similar.
1. If you know some other subject with significantly better 'graduate outcome', then please, do enlighten me. You are the first person to ever say CS is 'so poor'.

2. I never said you get handed a job. I'd also like to ask which sector doesn't require interns and projects? Because employers wanting graduates to have experience is ubiquitous in every discipline. During a normal MEng degree, most CS students have placements and build up plenty of projects during their degree

3. Let OP do their own research and let the graduate outcome survey do the talk. The fact you wrote such a long groundless opinion piece to diss CS suggests you have other intentions.
Last edited by AndyChow; 1 month ago
0
reply
Ahnaf17
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Psychology degrees typically just require or prefer one or more STEM subjects at A-level, although physics is maybe less immediately relevant than biology you will importantly be familiar with the same scientific practices. So you should be fine with those subjects going into a psychology degree for admissions purposes.

I would note that above suggestion of computer science is quite glib and not even that helpful if we are to understand it as presumably a suggestion on the best "graduate outcomes". I would note that CS grads have such poor graduate prospects in the UK the government commissioned two inquiries into the matter.

You also see very many grads of such courses who thought they could simply turn up to lectures for 3 years and learn to code and they would be handed a job at the end; this is not true. Graduate employers in the computing sector will put far more importance on relevant work experience, what kinds of programming projects you've done and how you've documented them as a portfolio of sorts on GitHub or similar.

So the glib suggestion of "do CS/learn to code" doesn't actually really help.
Thanks that was really helpful, I’ll see what I can do
0
reply
snipecaik
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
Try to choose a subject which is a balance between something which interests you and something which is also employable.
1
reply
Ahnaf17
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by AndyChow)
When in doubt, computer science.


P.S just look at graduate employment rate. Those information are widely available online.
If the vast majority of graduates goes into "Retail, catering & services" / "progressed to further education" then I'd be very careful about investing £50k and 3 years of my life in.

P.S.2 #6 is the correct answer
Thank you I’ll think about what you said
0
reply
Ahnaf17
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by AndyChow)
When in doubt, computer science. (Just a popular suggestion, don't quote me)


P.S just look at graduate employment rate. Those information are widely available online.
If the vast majority of graduates goes into "Retail, catering & services" / "progressed to further education" then I'd be very careful about investing £50k and 3 years of my life in.

P.S.2 #6 is the correct answer
I’m not sure what you mean by #6 is the correct answer
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by AndyChow)
1. If you know some other subject with significantly better 'graduate outcome', then please, do enlighten me. You are the first person to ever say CS is 'so poor'.

2. I never said you get handed a job. I'd also like to ask which sector doesn't require interns and projects? Because employers wanting graduates to have experience is ubiquitous in every discipline. During a normal MEng degree, most CS students have placements and build up plenty of projects during their degree

3. Let OP do their own research and let the graduate outcome survey do the talk. The fact you wrote such a long groundless opinion piece to diss CS suggests you have other intentions.
The Shadbolt review is literally a matter of public record. So I am neither the first person to raise issues with the matter nor is it a groundless opinion piece as you say, but the summary of a government commissioned inquiry, which is the result of an issue that was felt so serious it merited the cost of such an inquiry.

Also as regards "average" graduate salaries and employment rates, these do not necessarily tell the whole story and they may well be skewed by a small number of graduates from a small number of universities taking that course going into extremely lucrative roles, while the majority do not end up in these roles and may not even end up in the computing sector at all.
Last edited by artful_lounger; 1 month ago
0
reply
AndyChow
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by Ahnaf17)
I’m not sure what you mean by #6 is the correct answer
(Original post by snipecaik)
Try to choose a subject which is a balance between something which interests you and something which is also employable.
That's the advice I'd give. A person shouldn't pick a subject based purely on interest and passion. Because in 3 years' time the love for the subject might run out or urgent financial needs might have arisen. Employability is quite important; don't believe in the lie that 'any degree will get you employment' because some degrees are more desirable than others in an employer's eyes

On the contrary, there isn't any point doing something you hate just for the money. Striking a balance is very important
Last edited by AndyChow; 1 month ago
0
reply
AndyChow
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by artful_lounger)
Also as regards "average" graduate salaries and employment rates, these do not necessarily tell the whole story and they may well be skewed by a small number of graduates from a small number of universities taking that course going into extremely lucrative roles, while the majority do not end up in these roles and may not even end up in the computing sector at all.
Psychology at Oxford: £22.5K, most moved on to other professions
https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/univer...1-5eff9ca13b1e

CS at QMUL, a mid-tier ABB uni: £30K, 70% works in IT
https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/queen-...1-35b6dbbf609c
That is not to mention the G5 elite institutions.

I don't think there's even a need to dispute. It's pretty obvious that if you study at some CCC uni then whatever subject you pick it's not gonna have high employment figure. Employment is not easy these days and CS is no exception, no subject will get you easy jobs, but some are better than others. You said CS is 'so bad' but I've yet to hear from you a better alternative!
Last edited by AndyChow; 1 month ago
0
reply
swanseajack1
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by Ahnaf17)
I have the following A level subjects physics, maths and further maths. And I live in Manchester. Haven’t received my predicted grades but I’d say the grades will be AAA/AAB/ABB. I also have interest in astrophysics, music and psychology. Is there anyone who can help me choose a suitable course in a good Uni based on these info? I really need help since I’m a distant learner. And also, can I study psychology as an A level maths and physics student?
It really depends on your interests and what you prefer to study. With your subjects you could study Maths, Physics, all kinds of Engineering, Computer Science, Economics, Business Studies, Accountancy and even subjects like Law. I suspect you will be OK for Psychology but I would check out the entry requirements.
2
reply
Ukiyomo
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 month ago
#13
(Original post by Ahnaf17)
I have the following A level subjects physics, maths and further maths. And I live in Manchester. Haven’t received my predicted grades but I’d say the grades will be AAA/AAB/ABB. I also have interest in astrophysics, music and psychology. Is there anyone who can help me choose a suitable course in a good Uni based on these info? I really need help since I’m a distant learner. And also, can I study psychology as an A level maths and physics student?
Definitely look into Joint Honours courses, they are a great way to keep all your interests exercised and you will stand out to a lot of employers because of them (you can specialise in one of the subjects more anyway in most). St. Andrews and Glasgow both do computer science & psychology (and there are probably more). Lots and lots do maths & psych and you can usually find combinations you wouldn't even have thought would be offered.
0
reply
Ahnaf17
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by Ukiyomo)
Definitely look into Joint Honours courses, they are a great way to keep all your interests exercised and you will stand out to a lot of employers because of them (you can specialise in one of the subjects more anyway in most). St. Andrews and Glasgow both do computer science & psychology (and there are probably more). Lots and lots do maths & psych and you can usually find combinations you wouldn't even have thought would be offered.
Thanks a lot that was really helpful
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you experienced financial difficulties as a student due to Covid-19?

Yes, I have really struggled financially (78)
18.1%
I have experienced some financial difficulties (124)
28.77%
I haven't experienced any financial difficulties and things have stayed the same (162)
37.59%
I have had better financial opportunities as a result of the pandemic (54)
12.53%
I've had another experience (let us know in the thread!) (13)
3.02%

Watched Threads

View All