always-confused
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Hi,

I am considering studying a nutrition degree for the primary purpose of studying dietetics at post-grad. Not set on it yet though, doing some more research.

I was just wondering, what other options are available to nutrition degree graduates? What post-grad degrees in healthcare could you study besides dietetics? Any options?

Could you apply for the STP program or is the degree a bit irrelevant?

Anything else I haven't mentioned? Or is it not a great option in your eyes?

Let me know guys :-)
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Coventry University Student Ambassadors
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(Original post by always-confused)
Hi,

I am considering studying a nutrition degree for the primary purpose of studying dietetics at post-grad. Not set on it yet though, doing some more research.

I was just wondering, what other options are available to nutrition degree graduates? What post-grad degrees in healthcare could you study besides dietetics? Any options?

Could you apply for the STP program or is the degree a bit irrelevant?

Anything else I haven't mentioned? Or is it not a great option in your eyes?

Let me know guys :-)
Hey always-confused,

I hope you're alright and enjoying the holidays.

Thank you for your query.

In response to your message, there are many options available that you can do with a nutrition degree, such as becoming an animal nutritionist, food technologist, nutritional therapist, naturopath, an international aid/development worker, medical sales as well as a nutritionist (further info here). Having a nutrition degree is helpful in professions including catering manager, chef, health service manager, product/process development scientist and a personal trainer. However, you may be able to enter a wide range of professions with a nutrition degree, it all depends on what you're looking to do; this also applies for post-grad too. As long as you're able to obtain a 2:1 from undergrad, you're able to enter a post-grad doing a healthcare course. It's hard to know exactly what you're looking for until you know.

Applying for the STP means you need a minimum of a bachelor's to enable you onto the programme in the first place. The relevancy of the programme very much depends on the route you want to take to where you want to get to in your career. The website displays the commonly accepted degree that are accepted if you are interested in the STP, but neither nutrition or dietetics is stated.

May I ask why would you want to do a nutrition degree and then do a master's in dietetics?
I remember thinking about taking this route initially but decided against the idea. Dietetics is a legally protected professional under the law which allows you to be extensively trained, working to the highest standard as possible and be able to work in a variety of settings including clinical. Therefore, those who study and become a dietitian are only eligible to be called a dietitian, whereas studying nutrition means that you are qualified to provide information on food and healthy eating (for further info here).

I hope this helps
If you have further questions let me know!

Veronica
BSc Dietetics and Human Nutrition Student
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mellmelly4532
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(Original post by Coventry University Student Ambassadors)
Hey always-confused,

I hope you're alright and enjoying the holidays.

Thank you for your query.

In response to your message, there are many options available that you can do with a nutrition degree, such as becoming an animal nutritionist, food technologist, nutritional therapist, naturopath, an international aid/development worker, medical sales as well as a nutritionist (further info here). Having a nutrition degree is helpful in professions including catering manager, chef, health service manager, product/process development scientist and a personal trainer. However, you may be able to enter a wide range of professions with a nutrition degree, it all depends on what you're looking to do; this also applies for post-grad too. As long as you're able to obtain a 2:1 from undergrad, you're able to enter a post-grad doing a healthcare course. It's hard to know exactly what you're looking for until you know.

Applying for the STP means you need a minimum of a bachelor's to enable you onto the programme in the first place. The relevancy of the programme very much depends on the route you want to take to where you want to get to in your career. The website displays the commonly accepted degree that are accepted if you are interested in the STP, but neither nutrition or dietetics is stated.

May I ask why would you want to do a nutrition degree and then do a master's in dietetics?
I remember thinking about taking this route initially but decided against the idea. Dietetics is a legally protected professional under the law which allows you to be extensively trained, working to the highest standard as possible and be able to work in a variety of settings including clinical. Therefore, those who study and become a dietitian are only eligible to be called a dietitian, whereas studying nutrition means that you are qualified to provide information on food and healthy eating (for further info here).

I hope this helps
If you have further questions let me know!

Veronica
BSc Dietetics and Human Nutrition Student
Hi Veronica I have a similar question.


I have applied to study Human Nutrition but I am jumping into Year 2 as i am currently studying a science related HND, and had plans of doing a post grad of Dietetics. Would you personally recommend this? Also what were your opinions of studying human nutrition? What where the exams like? And is it an intense course that is hard ?

Also do you struggle to find a job? and just overall would you say its a waste of a course or to study it if you have passion for it

Mel
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(Original post by mellmelly4532)
Hi Veronica I have a similar question.


I have applied to study Human Nutrition but I am jumping into Year 2 as i am currently studying a science related HND, and had plans of doing a post grad of Dietetics. Would you personally recommend this? Also what were your opinions of studying human nutrition? What where the exams like? And is it an intense course that is hard ?

Also do you struggle to find a job? and just overall would you say its a waste of a course or to study it if you have passion for it

Mel
Hey mellmelly4532,

Thank you for your message.

To answer your questions depends on where you're hoping to end up post-uni career-wise and what you want to do. Both Human Nutrition and Dietetics are adequate courses as long as they're accredited and you are able to register with the appropriate council which recognises your profession.
There are rarely exams on my course as it's mainly coursework based or group assignments. There's typically one exam in the second year and that's it. It's only intense due to the workload and the amount of content to go through in a short space of time because there is placement to account for during the academic year which needs to be fitted in during or after the studies.
Personally, I did think about the option you mentioned before I applied to uni.
Studying Dietetics would be more beneficial because it is a recognised profession that is protected by the law whereas being a Nutritionist isn't. There's a lot more training in Dietetics than there is to become a Nutritionist because Dietitians are primarily trained to manage patients with health conditions and are trained to work in both a clinical and community setting.

May I ask, what is your reason for studying Human Nutrition and doing a post-grad in Dietetics?

In terms of finding a job, I am a second-year student so I don't have experience yet in that field. However, I would say there are plenty of job opportunities in the field of nutrition depending on which area you want to go whether it's the NHS, industry, commercial, media, or whatever your interest. Becoming a Dietitian means your job will always be needed in the NHS. There are so many Nutritionists working for different companies, that it's unlikely to be a saturated profession. With the increasing rise in health problems, there will always be a need for Dietitians and Nutritionists because being able to be there to help improve patients' lives is essential without professional guidance.
Nothing is a waste of time if you have the passion.

Veronica
Dietetics and Human Nutrition Student
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mellmelly4532
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(Original post by Coventry University Student Ambassadors)
Hey mellmelly4532,

Thank you for your message.

To answer your questions depends on where you're hoping to end up post-uni career-wise and what you want to do. Both Human Nutrition and Dietetics are adequate courses as long as they're accredited and you are able to register with the appropriate council which recognises your profession.
There are rarely exams on my course as it's mainly coursework based or group assignments. There's typically one exam in the second year and that's it. It's only intense due to the workload and the amount of content to go through in a short space of time because there is placement to account for during the academic year which needs to be fitted in during or after the studies.
Personally, I did think about the option you mentioned before I applied to uni.
Studying Dietetics would be more beneficial because it is a recognised profession that is protected by the law whereas being a Nutritionist isn't. There's a lot more training in Dietetics than there is to become a Nutritionist because Dietitians are primarily trained to manage patients with health conditions and are trained to work in both a clinical and community setting.

May I ask, what is your reason for studying Human Nutrition and doing a post-grad in Dietetics?

In terms of finding a job, I am a second-year student so I don't have experience yet in that field. However, I would say there are plenty of job opportunities in the field of nutrition depending on which area you want to go whether it's the NHS, industry, commercial, media, or whatever your interest. Becoming a Dietitian means your job will always be needed in the NHS. There are so many Nutritionists working for different companies, that it's unlikely to be a saturated profession. With the increasing rise in health problems, there will always be a need for Dietitians and Nutritionists because being able to be there to help improve patients' lives is essential without professional guidance.
Nothing is a waste of time if you have the passion.

Veronica
Dietetics and Human Nutrition Student
Thank you for your reply Veronica. You have been great help.

As I had no previous Biology qualification, I got this through my HND and to apply for Dietetics I could only start from Year 1, this put me off as I did not want to start Uni again from Year 1. Then my tutor found the option of transferring into Year 2 of a Nutrition course and doing Dietetics post grad , too add it is also different funding as I have used 2 years for my HND. Hope this makes sense haha

Hope all goes well with your studies
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