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    What does this mean?!

    Whenever i check out a university course about japanese, this always pops up.

    Is it saying that i need a language at A-level? Because i've not got one... anyway i can get round that?
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    (Original post by ~Vicky~)
    What does this mean?!

    Whenever i check out a university course about japanese, this always pops up.

    Is it saying that i need a language at A-level? Because i've not got one... anyway i can get round that?
    You can get around it by giving an A-level in a language.
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    'with a modern foreign language' generally means you study the subject along with another language that is in use today eg japanese. some universities ask you to have this at A level, some don't, but email them and ask what they want. For japanese, you probably wouldn't need prior experience becasue most people aren't given the chance at school or college to learn it.
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    have you tried sheffield?? i think they only 'prefer' a langauge at A-level
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    Well normally to study a language at University you need to have done at least one to A-Level standard to prove your linguistic ability.
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    well if i've not done any and i'm at the beginning of year 13!

    Is there anything i can do?
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    Are you bilingual? Or at least have some knowledge of learning languages? I suppose if you were bilingual and could prove it, then you might not need an A level in a MFL
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    I can speak french and english... are you sure that's good enough?
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    I can't write french well though... but i can speak it perfectly!
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    (Original post by ~Vicky~)
    well if i've not done any and i'm at the beginning of year 13!

    Is there anything i can do?
    You can do a number of things, such as:

    a) Not applying for Japanese
    b) Searching for a University which doesn't require you to be bilingual
    c) Prancing around like a ballerina.

    Take your pick.
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    (Original post by ~Vicky~)
    I can't write french well though... but i can speak it perfectly!
    Do you have an A-level in it? If you haven't they don't care how well you can speak it.
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    (Original post by Misogynist)
    You can do a number of things, such as:

    a) Not applying for Japanese
    b) Searching for a University which doesn't require you to be bilingual
    c) Prancing around like a ballerina.

    Take your pick.
    But i AM bilingual. I just haven't taken the A-level course.
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    (Original post by ~Vicky~)
    But i AM bilingual. I just haven't taken the A-level course.
    In a bit of a spot then. If you're fluent at French attempting an A-level at it won't be hard at all, considering you're from France too (apparently.) So go ahead and talk with your form head.
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    Phone up the admin tutors and tell that you are bilingual in French and English, but you don't have A-Levels in them, and you can't write in French. Then we'll see if you are an exception to the entry requirements.
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    (Original post by ~Vicky~)
    What does this mean?!

    Whenever i check out a university course about japanese, this always pops up.

    Is it saying that i need a language at A-level? Because i've not got one... anyway i can get round that?
    Sheffield is one of the best places to do Japanese and I'm pretty sure they don't require you to do a language at A-level. Japanese is so far removed from any European language and so language a-levels are mainly irrelevant! Also, the fact that you are a bilingual is good and all but I think the main reason some unis may ask for a language at A-level to do Japanese is because it shows that you have skills in learning a language, if that makes sense. If you are bilingual, the way you acquired that language is different to how you will learn Japanese if you go to university to do it.

    Out of interest where are you applying and which uni said you need a language at A- level?
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    (Original post by kimoso)
    Sheffield is one of the best places to do Japanese and I'm pretty sure they don't require you to do a language at A-level. Japanese is so far removed from any European language and so language a-levels are mainly irrelevant! Also, the fact that you are a bilingual is good and all but I think the main reason some unis may ask for a language at A-level to do Japanese is because it shows that you have skills in learning a language, if that makes sense. If you are bilingual, the way you acquired that language is different to how you will learn Japanese if you go to university to do it.

    Out of interest where are you applying and which uni said you need a language at A- level?
    Well i was looking at Manchester - which offered a combined course with English Language which would have been perfect for me!

    http://www.manchester.ac.uk/undergra...se/?code=06809

    SOAS said they'd give perferance to people with a foreign language too. :o:
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    Yeah I think it pretty much seems that you can either just not apply for that Manchester course or just do an A-level in French. Perhaps you can get some private tuition? I'm sure that if you can speak it fluently you'd learn how to spell it easily enough

    And yeah most places do give preferance to those with a foreign language but it's not essential is it? Just if you can write a convincing PS...

    Do you have a language at GCSE at least?
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    (Original post by kimoso)
    Yeah I think it pretty much seems that you can either just not apply for that Manchester course or just do an A-level in French. Perhaps you can get some private tuition? I'm sure that if you can speak it fluently you'd learn how to spell it easily enough

    And yeah most places do give preferance to those with a foreign language but it's not essential is it? Just if you can write a convincing PS...

    Do you have a language at GCSE at least?
    :yep: I got a B in French GCSE

    I did amazingly well in the oral! (my teacher mentioned only 1 mark off full)

    but my writing paper did me in. :shifty:
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    That might not work too well in your favour either.

    Yeah, I would phone up some admissons tutors in the coming weeks and explain.
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    You do realise if you are going to study Japanese that it has one of the most difficult writing systems in the world right? o_O

    But anyway, the B's quite good. It's better than nothing, you could always email Manchester and tell them of your situation - that you're bilingual etc.
 
 
 
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