Is it possible to begin A Levels at 19/20 years old?

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ijusthaveawued
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I believe I finished my GCSE’s in 2016, resulting in mostly A*’s. I then went on to do my A Levels, but was diagnosed with anxiety and depression, and ultimately ended up having to drop out a month or two before the exams because I was considered a suicide risk.

It is now 2020 and I would not consider myself to be depressed anymore. I would love to just “pick up where I left off” and to continue with my topics of maths, further maths, biology, and chemistry if possible. I live around Zones 4/5 London.
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999tigger
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(Original post by ijusthaveawued)
I believe I finished my GCSE’s in 2016, resulting in mostly A*’s. I then went on to do my A Levels, but was diagnosed with anxiety and depression, and ultimately ended up having to drop out a month or two before the exams because I was considered a suicide risk.

It is now 2020 and I would not consider myself to be depressed anymore. I would love to just “pick up where I left off” and to continue with my topics of maths, further maths, biology, and chemistry if possible. I live around Zones 4/5 London.
Too old for school.
You would have to find a college that does them. There are some in London, but I cant remember which ones.
https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/

Failing that you can buy online courses or self teach but you will have to pay fees yourself. They are expensive. Do you know if you passed your practical endorsements? Think it unlikely you will find a college doing further Maths.
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ijusthaveawued
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Too old for school.
You would have to find a college that does them. There are some in London, but I cant remember which ones.
https://www.compare-school-performance.service.gov.uk/

Failing that you can buy online courses or self teach but you will have to pay fees yourself. They are expensive. Do you know if you passed your practical endorsements? Think it unlikely you will find a college doing further Maths.
I thought as much, thank you. I am fine with dropping further maths, so long as I can keep the core three, so that is good news also. I’m sure I could take Further Maths independently as well, anyway.

I guess it’s in the name, but the practical endorsements were the practicals they had us do, right? I believe I passed four of those, but I am positive that I had some that still needed finishing. Do you know how I’d go about doing that? I’m also pretty sure that we had to do them because they’d be in the exam, so I think I’ll have to redo them all anyway?

I am already teaching myself in preparation, so I think that’s another very good option for me. I guess it would just be three different subjects, so if you have any idea how much that would cost, that’d be really helpful. I’ve been incredibly frugal since I left school in preparation for my return, so costs should not be an issue.

Thank you again😁
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999tigger
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(Original post by ijusthaveawued)
I thought as much, thank you. I am fine with dropping further maths, so long as I can keep the core three, so that is good news also. I’m sure I could take Further Maths independently as well, anyway.

I guess it’s in the name, but the practical endorsements were the practicals they had us do, right? I believe I passed four of those, but I am positive that I had some that still needed finishing. Do you know how I’d go about doing that? I’m also pretty sure that we had to do them because they’d be in the exam, so I think I’ll have to redo them all anyway?

I am already teaching myself in preparation, so I think that’s another very good option for me. I guess it would just be three different subjects, so if you have any idea how much that would cost, that’d be really helpful. I’ve been incredibly frugal since I left school in preparation for my return, so costs should not be an issue.

Thank you again😁
1. Yes FM- just do it as a private candidate. My point was I think its unlikely it will be offered by colleges.
2. Contact old school and ask. the point is you can transfer the credit. Separate from the exam and £800-1300 for each subject.
3. Will give an estimate in costs update later.
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ThiagoBrigido
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(Original post by ijusthaveawued)
I believe I finished my GCSE’s in 2016, resulting in mostly A*’s. I then went on to do my A Levels, but was diagnosed with anxiety and depression, and ultimately ended up having to drop out a month or two before the exams because I was considered a suicide risk.

It is now 2020 and I would not consider myself to be depressed anymore. I would love to just “pick up where I left off” and to continue with my topics of maths, further maths, biology, and chemistry if possible. I live around Zones 4/5 London.

You're not old at all!
I did all my A-levels about three years ago at the age of 35 . I got A for Maths, A for further maths and B for physics purely by self-studying no spoon fed, no procrastination neither. However for physics practicals I attended this private college, which was cheap £550 for 12 practicals. How far does Hendon sound to you?
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ijusthaveawued
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(Original post by ThiagoBrigido)
You're not old at all!
I did all my A-levels about three years ago at the age of 35 . I got A for Maths, A for further maths and B for physics purely by self-studying no spoon fed, no procrastination neither. However for physics practicals I attended this private college, which was cheap £550 for 12 practicals. How far does Hendon sound to you?
Hendon is about 1 1/4 hours by train so it’s not bad at all if it’s just 12 trips. It gives me an excuse to visit some new areas at least.

If I may ask you some questions:

Did you do a full year of studying for your AS levels, and then a year of A Levels? Did you take an exam for both levels?
How did you know when you were ready to sit the exams?
How long were you actively studying, before deciding to sit your exams?
Did you sit all of your exams at once?
If you could go back, what do you think you’d have been able to do to get even higher grades?
Are you naturally gifted when it comes to maths/physics?
How did you go about studying the curriculum? Which textbooks to use, what would be on the test, etc.
Were you working at the same time that you were doing your A levels? Wife? Kids?

Of course you don’t have to answer these but if you do then thank you so much because it will really put my mind at rest.
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2500_2
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(Original post by ijusthaveawued)
I believe I finished my GCSE’s in 2016, resulting in mostly A*’s. I then went on to do my A Levels, but was diagnosed with anxiety and depression, and ultimately ended up having to drop out a month or two before the exams because I was considered a suicide risk.

It is now 2020 and I would not consider myself to be depressed anymore. I would love to just “pick up where I left off” and to continue with my topics of maths, further maths, biology, and chemistry if possible. I live around Zones 4/5 London.
Absolutely you can. However as you are over 19 you aren't eligible any more for 'normal' school or college education.

Couple of options:
- self-study and pay for the exams/assessments
- get an adult learner loan and call round to find a college that is used to working with these (there's also a bursary if you have extra costs)
- instead of doing Alevels, do an Access to HE course with an adult learner loan and then it'll be written off when you finish your degree
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ThiagoBrigido
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(Original post by ijusthaveawued)
Hendon is about 1 1/4 hours by train so it’s not bad at all if it’s just 12 trips. It gives me an excuse to visit some new areas at least.

If I may ask you some questions:

Did you do a full year of studying for your AS levels, and then a year of A Levels? Did you take an exam for both levels?
How did you know when you were ready to sit the exams?
How long were you actively studying, before deciding to sit your exams?
Did you sit all of your exams at once?
If you could go back, what do you think you’d have been able to do to get even higher grades?
Are you naturally gifted when it comes to maths/physics?
How did you go about studying the curriculum? Which textbooks to use, what would be on the test, etc.
Were you working at the same time that you were doing your A levels? Wife? Kids?

Of course you don’t have to answer these but if you do then thank you so much because it will really put my mind at rest.
I have not done AS exam. Two years preparing for the A-level exams(OCR A) alongside as having a very hectic part-time job in finance, as well as being a dad and a husband. I don't believe anyone is gifted! Hard work is what pays off! I never look back, I'm pleased with the A-level results I achieved, considering English is not my first language and the life routine, I was able to get a contextual offer in a top 5 UK uni based on my results AAB ( if that matters?!). Perseverance is the key, you can definitely do it! I wish you all the very best with it!
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Arden University
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(Original post by ijusthaveawued)
I believe I finished my GCSE’s in 2016, resulting in mostly A*’s. I then went on to do my A Levels, but was diagnosed with anxiety and depression, and ultimately ended up having to drop out a month or two before the exams because I was considered a suicide risk.

It is now 2020 and I would not consider myself to be depressed anymore. I would love to just “pick up where I left off” and to continue with my topics of maths, further maths, biology, and chemistry if possible. I live around Zones 4/5 London.
ijusthaveawued

It sounds like you do brilliant in your GCSE's (much better than I did, well done!)

You can apply for an advanced learner loan to pay for your level 3 course. What exactly do you want to do after college? You could potentially do an Access to HE Science course which would cover Biology, Chemistry, and another module - although it would like be physics. That is a one year course, where your student loan is written off for the level 3 if you graduate. Maths is also an option on an Engineering pathway, but that doesn't seem to be your cup of tea

It is worth speaking to your local FE College

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
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