samg09
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Hey guys. I’m in my second year or university and I just want some advice about effective revision strategies for university. There is so much content and reading and stuff I’m just not sure how to go about it or even when to begin. If anyone has some successful tips please let me known! TIA
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by samg09)
Hey guys. I’m in my second year or university and I just want some advice about effective revision strategies for university. There is so much content and reading and stuff I’m just not sure how to go about it or even when to begin. If anyone has some successful tips please let me known! TIA
Hello samg09!

Do you make notes on all of your extra reading?
Unless the lecturer specifically tells you to do this then I would just take the extra reading as extra reading. I find it helps to consolidate the information you have been taught in lecturers and put it into a contextual form that makes it easier to understand!
(This obviously depends on your course! I do science based so this is what I find helps)

I also really like to do my revision on flash cards with the key information that I need to know on there
I go through them and ask someone to test me on them or I rewrite the content until I am much more confident on it!

I hope these tips help you a little
Eloise - Official Student Rep
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samg09
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(Original post by University of Portsmouth Student Rep)
Hello samg09!

Do you make notes on all of your extra reading?
Unless the lecturer specifically tells you to do this then I would just take the extra reading as extra reading. I find it helps to consolidate the information you have been taught in lecturers and put it into a contextual form that makes it easier to understand!
(This obviously depends on your course! I do science based so this is what I find helps)

I also really like to do my revision on flash cards with the key information that I need to know on there
I go through them and ask someone to test me on them or I rewrite the content until I am much more confident on it!

I hope these tips help you a little
Eloise - Official Student Rep
Hey Eloise.
Thanks for your response, was so helpful! I do psychology so there’s a tonne of reading as you can imagine, mostly studies etc. I think I’ll try what you said and view the reading as helping contextualise and make sense of the lecture rather than reading it and making an entire new set of notes. Thanks for the advice!
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Rabbit2
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(Original post by samg09)
Hey guys. I’m in my second year or university and I just want some advice about effective revision strategies for university. There is so much content and reading and stuff I’m just not sure how to go about it or even when to begin. If anyone has some successful tips please let me known! TIA
When i was 'at school' [as you lot say], there were 10 or 12 students who always got straight A's. They lived on the 'expensive' side of town - i didn't. While i was running my paper delivery route in the afternoons, they would usually be out in the pastures with their horses. Hunt club, fox hunting..that sort of thing. They NEVER seemed to study. I couldn't figure it out! I was busting my butt - and the best i could do was C's, D's, and the occasional F. I have a 130 IQ, so i'm not stupid, but i couldn't manage to get a B on a bet!

I grew up around the same small little town about 45 miles west of Washington, D.C. - so i ended up in high school with the same bunch of kids. Same story. When i got to uni, i 'faked' my way through an electrical engineering degree [most of us did (faked)]. A few years later, i decided that - since many fresh graduates were applying to the government organisation that i worked for - already equipped with master's degrees, that i'd better get one of those to preserve my 'salability'. I got into a local uni's grad school [www.gwu.edu], and started working my way through one course at a time - whilst working full time. As a few years went by, i found that the course work was getting harder faster than i was getting 'better'. It became apparent that if i didnd't 'clean up my act' - that i wasn't going to make it out with a degree!!

Thinking about the situation - i reaslised that a major problem was that i was studying [revising] like crazzy for exams, but that much of what i was studying wasn't on the exam. Basically i was wasting much of my study time. I found that by keeping track of how much lecture time the instructor spent on each individual topic in lecture, and how much work they did, i could get a measure of how important they thought each topic was. Logically, the instructor was most interested in testing the student's retention of what THE INSTRUCTOR thought was most important. Each time the instructor started talking about another topic, i would note the time (and date) on my notes. When the instructor finished talking about that topic - i would note the time again.

I allocated a "work factor" to each level of effort that the instructor could use. Nobody likes to do extra work, and that applies to instructors too. Since i now have a master's degree, and have taught at the uni level, i can attest to that. For just talking about something, i would allocate something like a 1.1 to a 1.5 "work factor" - depending upon how organised & planned out the talk was. For a 'chalk talk' - i.e. a discussion illustrated by drawing on the blackboard - i would allocate a 2.1 to a 2.8 - depending on how involved the drawing was, was it multi-colour, did it involve more than one blackboard square..etc. A 'pre-prepared handout elevated us to another level: 3.1 to 3.8 or so [from single page, single sided, black and white, to multi-page, colour, two sided. Viewgraphs and an overhead projector [does anyone still do that??] raised us to a 4.1 to a 4.8 or so [you have to go get the projector, a screen, an extention cord...etc]. A movie projector and a film raised us another notch to 5.1 to 5.8.

I would multiply the number of minutes spent by the "work factor" that applied to that presentation. In the event of a "split presentation" - say 5 minutes just talking about something, then launching into a 'medium complexity' 'chalk talk' that lasted 6 minutes, i would multiply the 5 by say 1.3 (medium complexity talk). This would give a 6.5 for that part of the presentation. I would then multiply the 6 by 2.5 (medium complexity chalk talk) to get 15.0 for that part. Adding the two together would give me 21.5 for the complete presentation on that topic. The same procedure would be followed for each topic presented during the grading period.

Just before the next exam: [in grad school, we only had a mid-term and a final exam. Our entire grade was based upon those two grades]. In undergraduate uni, you would probably have more exams] you go through your notes for each topic. Add together the total scores for each complete presentation of each topic. The total score accumulated for each topic gives you a measure of how important the instructor thinks that particular topic is - and therefore the likelihood that a question on that topic will appear on the final exam. Figure out how many questions you have time for on the exam. In my courses, working out the solution to a particular question [which would involve remembering various equations & doing the calculations to use them to get the final answer], would take about 10 to 12 minutes if you knew what you were doing. Our exams typically lasted about an hour. Therefore, you had time for about 5 to 6 problems on a typical exam. For safety, i would increase this number - in case the instructor decided to 'skip over' one of the topics, if they felt that the students were sufficiently knowledgeable on that topic. I would therefore take the top 8 or 9 topics, and fabricate a problem for each one that included absolutely everything that had been covered in classroom discussion, instructor comments, or assigned homework problems. Adjust the timing and number of problems to fit your situation.

Doing this dramatically reduced my 'revision' time, and concurrently substantially increased the number of things that i had studied that actually appeared on the exam - increasing my grade results, and resulting in my getting my master's degree. I don't think that i would have made it without using something like this. Feel free to adjust the "work factor" numbers for each level of effort by the instructor, and make other adjustments depending upon the individual instructor. This isn't 'cast in stone' - but should give some help in figuring out what the instructor thinks is important - which is the end goal after all. Best of luck!!
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Arden University
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Hi there,

One tool that helped me to understand what was the most effective way for me to be studying and be able to remember all of the content I have to remember for exams was a little quiz that is on our website. It is a simple 5 minute quiz that tells you how best to learn as well as giving you some tips on how to utilize this form of learning. I don't know if you have learnt before how there are different types of learners (visual, auditory, kinesthetic as examples) and it is said that if you work out how you learn best it helps you to revise at your best. Here is the link to the quiz:
https://arden.ac.uk/what-type-learner-are-you

It may benefit you to take this quiz and follow the tips given as these may help you revise more efficiently!

There are many of these types of quizzes around if you also enter this into google too.

Toni,
Student Ambassador
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UniofReading
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(Original post by samg09)
Hey guys. I’m in my second year or university and I just want some advice about effective revision strategies for university. There is so much content and reading and stuff I’m just not sure how to go about it or even when to begin. If anyone has some successful tips please let me known! TIA
Hey samg09,

I personally would make sure you go over the lectures first and make sure you know what the learning objectives are asking of you. Then, when you do your reading, you can make sure you are mostly focussing on the learning objectives and are not going too outside what is required. I would also try and make sure you're making to-do lists for yourself and breaking down all of the tasks needed which can help make them more manageable so that all the work isn't as overwhelming. I also find it useful to create a to-do list but also be able to prioritise the tasks and rank ensuring that you get the most important and urgent tasks done.

Hope this helps and let us know if you have any other questions!
From,

Amina 😊
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University of Bradford
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(Original post by samg09)
Hey guys. I’m in my second year or university and I just want some advice about effective revision strategies for university. There is so much content and reading and stuff I’m just not sure how to go about it or even when to begin. If anyone has some successful tips please let me known! TIA
Hey!

I thought you might find this blog post useful:
5 note-taking methods all students should know

I wish you the very best of luck with your uni experience, hope you enjoy every minute of it

Becky
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