Ukiyomo
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Hi! I'm an A-Level Psychology student predicted A* and near the end of my course. I'm hoping to go to Oxford to do Experimental Psychology and have my interview on the w/b 14th December.

So, ask me anything about Psych A-Level, Psych Degrees, topics you struggle with, Psych jobs, etc! I hope i can help someone and if I cant someone else here can
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RainyMeow
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Can you help me to understand strengths and weaknesses in the humanistic theory please?
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anon033
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(Original post by RainyMeow)
Can you help me to understand strengths and weaknesses in the humanistic theory please?
I know I'm not the OP, but I literally just did an assessment on approaches last week. I do AQA so don't know if that changes anything and I'm year 13.

Here's the condensed version of my notes:
+ Real life applications in the form of therapy. CCT is supportive of individuals with problems and treats them with respect. Seen as a non directive form of therapy. This can be used to help people in their lives, offering a safe space for them to grow as people.

+ Acknowledges that individuals have free will and the ability to improve themselves, via focussing on developing solutions to the patient’s current problems. This is in stark contrast with Freud’s psychotherapies, which tend to dwell upon childhood experiences and so may be frustrating for the patient who has identified the cause of their problems.

+ Holistic Approach. Focussing on the individual’s subjective experiences as a whole as a method of investigating behaviour. Contrasts the cognitive approach (which sees the brain’s functions as analogous to a computer), the biological approach (which sees humans purely as biological organisms made up of physiological processes) and behaviourism (where all behaviour is seen as the product of past reinforcement contingencies).

- Rejects scientific methodology like experiments and typically uses qualitative research methods e.g. diaries, open ended questionnaires, unstructured interviews and observations. These methods are useful for study at an individual level but not for general populations of larger amounts of people. The way to understand other people is to sit and talk, share experiences and be open to their feelings. (could be argued as a strength or weakness depending on how you look at it)

- Seen as culturally biased as it is based on assumptions linked to the west/individualistic society. Many ideas linked with humanistic psych like individual freedom, autonomy and personal growth are more readily associated with the western cultures like the US. Collectivist cultures may not easily identify with the ideals of this approach. It’s a product of the cultural context it was developed in.


I tried to edit out my acronyms so it would make sense to you. If any of these confuse you, feel free to ask and I'll try to explain them better, this is just what makes sense to me. Hope this helped!
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RainyMeow
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(Original post by anon033)
I know I'm not the OP, but I literally just did an assessment on approaches last week. I do AQA so don't know if that changes anything and I'm year 13.

Here's the condensed version of my notes:
+ Real life applications in the form of therapy. CCT is supportive of individuals with problems and treats them with respect. Seen as a non directive form of therapy. This can be used to help people in their lives, offering a safe space for them to grow as people.

+ Acknowledges that individuals have free will and the ability to improve themselves, via focussing on developing solutions to the patient’s current problems. This is in stark contrast with Freud’s psychotherapies, which tend to dwell upon childhood experiences and so may be frustrating for the patient who has identified the cause of their problems.

+ Holistic Approach. Focussing on the individual’s subjective experiences as a whole as a method of investigating behaviour. Contrasts the cognitive approach (which sees the brain’s functions as analogous to a computer), the biological approach (which sees humans purely as biological organisms made up of physiological processes) and behaviourism (where all behaviour is seen as the product of past reinforcement contingencies).

- Rejects scientific methodology like experiments and typically uses qualitative research methods e.g. diaries, open ended questionnaires, unstructured interviews and observations. These methods are useful for study at an individual level but not for general populations of larger amounts of people. The way to understand other people is to sit and talk, share experiences and be open to their feelings. (could be argued as a strength or weakness depending on how you look at it)

- Seen as culturally biased as it is based on assumptions linked to the west/individualistic society. Many ideas linked with humanistic psych like individual freedom, autonomy and personal growth are more readily associated with the western cultures like the US. Collectivist cultures may not easily identify with the ideals of this approach. It’s a product of the cultural context it was developed in.


I tried to edit out my acronyms so it would make sense to you. If any of these confuse you, feel free to ask and I'll try to explain them better, this is just what makes sense to me. Hope this helped!
Thankyou so much for replying! This does help, I’m going to do some reading tonight around these points.
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anon033
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(Original post by RainyMeow)
Thankyou so much for replying! This does help, I’m going to do some reading tonight around these points.
No problem and good luck!

If you're doing more reading around it, I'd try 'simply psychology' or 'tutor 2 u' as they have more detail and revision videos as well as notes too. There's a downloadable PDF on there and quizzes to test yourself too.
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Ukiyomo
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(Original post by RainyMeow)
Thankyou so much for replying! This does help, I’m going to do some reading tonight around these points.
I agree with all these points and I probably wouldn't have said anything differently! The only thing I would add to the free will point is that the theory tends to resonate with how people feel about themselves and their lives which gives it some type of validity, even if it is not strictly scientific.
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