Will I be able to travel abroad normally in summer next year?

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Imsosad123
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Am I going to be able to go to the airport and travel normally next year? My family is foreign, and my grandad is turning 90 next year in my native country, and I want to spend time with him and my extended family there as much as possible before he passes. I also love the vibes and feelings I get when I’m at the airport or at a plane, it’s an unexplainable feeling if you haven’t been before or you go often there. However corona is ruining our plans. I went last time in summer 2019 (we got sooo lucky that we didn’t post pone it to 2020). And we were planning to go in 2021 next, what do you guys think about this? Is the vaccine going to come out before July 2021? And will life be fairly normal by that time? (Ik it’s not gonna be completely normal but will I be able to travel abroad normally)
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Imsosad123
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tinygirl96
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yeah
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Imsosad123
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(Original post by tinygirl96)
yeah
Why do you think so?
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jaycherche
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If you get the vaccine by then, then probably yes
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Desideri
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The vaccine has already basically ‘come out’. One of them has been approved and shipped to the UK, ready to start being used within the next couple of weeks. The government are hoping everyone vulnerable will have been vaccinated by Easter. I don’t know if I believe their timeline, but by July then a good proportion of the population should have had it.

It’s impossible to say exactly what will be happening in the summer. Things are changing so quickly all the time. Maybe you’ll need proof of vaccine for entry to some countries (just like currently you need to prove you’ve had a yellow fever or meningitis vaccine for certain countries), or maybe you’ll need to do a negative Covid test at the airport.

There could still be quarantine requirements, but personally I think most countries will try to get rid of them ASAP in order to reopen their economy to tourists.
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Imsosad123
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(Original post by Desideri)
The vaccine has already basically ‘come out’. One of them has been approved and shipped to the UK, ready to start being used within the next couple of weeks. The government are hoping everyone vulnerable will have been vaccinated by Easter. I don’t know if I believe their timeline, but by July then a good proportion of the population should have had it.

It’s impossible to say exactly what will be happening in the summer. Things are changing so quickly all the time. Maybe you’ll need proof of vaccine for entry to some countries (just like currently you need to prove you’ve had a yellow fever or meningitis vaccine for certain countries), or maybe you’ll need to do a negative Covid test at the airport.

There could still be quarantine requirements, but personally I think most countries will try to get rid of them ASAP in order to reopen their economy to tourists.
Thank you so much this is very helpful!
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Kallisto
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Those are the questions I asked myself the last weeks more than once. I hope so for 2021, although I seriously think that Corona will even be present in 2022.
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Imsosad123
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(Original post by Kallisto)
Those are the questions I asked myself the last weeks more than once. I hope so for 2021, although I seriously think that Corona will even be present in 2022.
But haven’t they come out with a vaccine?
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Imsosad123)
But haven’t they come out with a vaccine?
If the virus mutates, the vaccine is useless. If the virologists are right and there are more than one virus culture, a single vaccine won't stop the corona crisis. A (tiny) part, but the whole pandemic? never.
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PilgrimOfTruth
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(Original post by Kallisto)
If the virus mutates, the vaccine is useless. If the virologists are right and there are more than one virus culture, a single vaccine won't stop the corona crisis. A (tiny) part, but the whole pandemic? never.
You could not be more on point !

There were 12 individual strains of SARS-COV-2 in circulation as early as March. There are now over 30 individual strains.

Funny how the media is keeping rather quiet about that . . . . . . . .

Flu vaccines are notorious for being pretty ineffective, mostly because there are over 200 strains of Flu and the vaccines at best only cover 3-4 of them. It's very difficult to predict which strains will be circulating in a given winter season and esp trying to do it months in advance.

Clearly the same will be true for Covid. The vaccines can't possibly cover all the strains imho because the development and testing was happening months ago and new strains will have appeared since.

So surely anyone thinking of getting the shots is going to want to know just how many strains the vaccine covers them for and which specific ones.

What real impact will be made if you are protected for 3 strains of Covid but not for the other 27??

Of course I fully expect the NHS and industry in general to wax lyrical about them having covered "the most likely" or "most prevalent strain". After all they say the same with Flu vaccines. But the reality is that we are likely to see Covid shots go the same way as Flu shots imo with the vulnerable having to get yearly shots and hoping for the best that the manufacturers guessed the right strains.

This situation also makes vaccine certification a total nonsense. What would be the point? It's no use waving a vaccination paper if you're only covered for 3 strains of Covid when there are 30+ out there. It also would make a nonsense of trying to mandate vaccines for air flights, cruises, theatres, cinemas and the like.
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Kallisto
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(Original post by PilgrimOfTruth)
You could not be more on point !

There were 12 individual strains of SARS-COV-2 in circulation as early as March. There are now over 30 individual strains.

Funny how the media is keeping rather quiet about that . . . . . . . .

(...)
Because this would trouble the people? because it is a bad news and people don't like to read it?

I agree what you said. We set wrong hopes in a vaccination. Sooner or later people should plan with the virus and how a fairly normal life is possible instead of to get rid it off. We need new concepts and new views on the crisis.
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Ambitious1999
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(Original post by Imsosad123)
Am I going to be able to go to the airport and travel normally next year? My family is foreign, and my grandad is turning 90 next year in my native country, and I want to spend time with him and my extended family there as much as possible before he passes. I also love the vibes and feelings I get when I’m at the airport or at a plane, it’s an unexplainable feeling if you haven’t been before or you go often there. However corona is ruining our plans. I went last time in summer 2019 (we got sooo lucky that we didn’t post pone it to 2020). And we were planning to go in 2021 next, what do you guys think about this? Is the vaccine going to come out before July 2021? And will life be fairly normal by that time? (Ik it’s not gonna be completely normal but will I be able to travel abroad normally)
Yes it should be better. The only problem is bloody Brexit but that won’t affect you if you’re not travelling to the EU.
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Imsosad123
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(Original post by PilgrimOfTruth)
You could not be more on point !

There were 12 individual strains of SARS-COV-2 in circulation as early as March. There are now over 30 individual strains.

Funny how the media is keeping rather quiet about that . . . . . . . .

Flu vaccines are notorious for being pretty ineffective, mostly because there are over 200 strains of Flu and the vaccines at best only cover 3-4 of them. It's very difficult to predict which strains will be circulating in a given winter season and esp trying to do it months in advance.

Clearly the same will be true for Covid. The vaccines can't possibly cover all the strains imho because the development and testing was happening months ago and new strains will have appeared since.

So surely anyone thinking of getting the shots is going to want to know just how many strains the vaccine covers them for and which specific ones.

What real impact will be made if you are protected for 3 strains of Covid but not for the other 27??

Of course I fully expect the NHS and industry in general to wax lyrical about them having covered "the most likely" or "most prevalent strain". After all they say the same with Flu vaccines. But the reality is that we are likely to see Covid shots go the same way as Flu shots imo with the vulnerable having to get yearly shots and hoping for the best that the manufacturers guessed the right strains.

This situation also makes vaccine certification a total nonsense. What would be the point? It's no use waving a vaccination paper if you're only covered for 3 strains of Covid when there are 30+ out there. It also would make a nonsense of trying to mandate vaccines for air flights, cruises, theatres, cinemas and the like.
We can’t be locked up in our houses forever

(Original post by Ambitious1999)
Yes it should be better. The only problem is bloody Brexit but that won’t affect you if you’re not travelling to the EU.
Thank you for ur answer
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User135792468
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(Original post by Imsosad123)
Am I going to be able to go to the airport and travel normally next year? My family is foreign, and my grandad is turning 90 next year in my native country, and I want to spend time with him and my extended family there as much as possible before he passes. I also love the vibes and feelings I get when I’m at the airport or at a plane, it’s an unexplainable feeling if you haven’t been before or you go often there. However corona is ruining our plans. I went last time in summer 2019 (we got sooo lucky that we didn’t post pone it to 2020). And we were planning to go in 2021 next, what do you guys think about this? Is the vaccine going to come out before July 2021? And will life be fairly normal by that time? (Ik it’s not gonna be completely normal but will I be able to travel abroad normally)
Vaccines are being rolled out to the eldest of the country and to people with health conditions. The biggest factors contributing to the severity of Covid seems to be age and pre-existing conditions. The oldest people are being vaccinated first so I believe the curve is going to flatten and probably by February people won’t even speak about COVID anymore.

Definitely by summer 2021, COVID would have long past. The purpose of the vaccine is to stop people having deadly symptoms, but some people don’t even get any symptoms so we don’t actually have to vaccinate everyone.

I have type 1 diabetes and I’m getting both a Meningitis and pneumonia jab - the pneumonia one is linked to my diabetes but that doesn’t mean we need to vaccinate everyone against pneumonia do we?
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Imsosad123
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(Original post by User135792468)
Vaccines are being rolled out to the eldest of the country and to people with health conditions. The biggest factors contributing to the severity of Covid seems to be age and pre-existing conditions. The oldest people are being vaccinated first so I believe the curve is going to flatten and probably by February people won’t even speak about COVID anymore.

Definitely by summer 2021, COVID would have long past. The purpose of the vaccine is to stop people having deadly symptoms, but some people don’t even get any symptoms so we don’t actually have to vaccinate everyone.

I have type 1 diabetes and I’m getting both a Meningitis and pneumonia jab - the pneumonia one is linked to my diabetes but that doesn’t mean we need to vaccinate everyone against pneumonia do we?
Oh, well that’s good news. My dad has type 1 diabetes too so he’ll probably get the vaccine
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MagneticNorth
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(Original post by Kallisto)
If the virus mutates, the vaccine is useless. If the virologists are right and there are more than one virus culture, a single vaccine won't stop the corona crisis. A (tiny) part, but the whole pandemic? never.
The amount of misinformation on this site is ludicrous! :mad:

The whole point of mRNA vaccines is that they're easily adjustable to different strains.
Extract about the Covid-19 vaccine from Forbes:
"In addition, the virus has already mutated several times, including a new strain recently found to pass from minks to humans in Denmark.
The current Covid-19 vaccine that Moderna is making might not be effective against these new strains, but Bancel is confident that if a new vaccine needs to be made, it can be done in a matter of weeks by using the blueprint of the current vaccine and just swapping out the genetic differences. “mRNA is fantastic because you can just swap a new strain and run with it, so that’s good,” he says."
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Kallisto
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(Original post by MagneticNorth)
The amount of misinformation on this site is ludicrous! :mad:

The whole point of mRNA vaccines is that they're easily adjustable to different strains.
Extract about the Covid-19 vaccine from Forbes:
"In addition, the virus has already mutated several times, including a new strain recently found to pass from minks to humans in Denmark.
The current Covid-19 vaccine that Moderna is making might not be effective against these new strains, but Bancel is confident that if a new vaccine needs to be made, it can be done in a matter of weeks by using the blueprint of the current vaccine and just swapping out the genetic differences. “mRNA is fantastic because you can just swap a new strain and run with it, so that’s good,” he says."
Calm down! After what I have read about mRNA vaccine on Wikipedia , the vaccine does not seem to be so harmless as some people think. I found this in the paragraph of side effects and risks:


(...)People susceptible to an autoimmune response may have an adverse reaction to RNA vaccines.[6] Reactogenicity is similar to that of conventional, non-RNA, vaccines.

mRNA strands in the vaccine may elicit an unintended immune reaction; to minimize this, mRNA vaccine sequences are designed to mimic those produced by mammalian cell (i.e. human cells).

The drug delivery system holding the mRNA molecule (protecting the fragile mRNA strands from being broken down before they enter the human cell), are PEGylated lipid nanoparticles that can be reactogenic, triggering their own immune reactions, and causing damage to the liver at higher doses.[32] Strong reactogenic effects were reported in trials of novel COVID-19 RNA vaccines. (...)
So before we praise a vaccine, let us wait what it does exaclty in the next weeks, months and years.
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MagneticNorth
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(Original post by Kallisto)
Calm down! After what I have read about mRNA vaccine on Wikipedia , the vaccine does not seem to be so harmless as some people think. I found this in the paragraph of side effects and risks:




So before we praise a vaccine, let us wait what it does exaclty in the next weeks, months and years.
"Calm Down"... known to be one of the finest debating techniques :rolleyes:

If you follow the link to reference [33] for the last bit of your extract on "Strong reactogenic effects". It'll take you here. Because...well, context!
Here goes an extract:
"This summer, computational biologist Luke Hutchison volunteered for a trial of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine. But after the second injection, his arm swelled up to the size of a “goose egg,” Hutchison says. He can't be sure he got the vaccine and not a placebo, but within a few hours, Hutchison, who was healthy and 43, was beset by bone and muscle aches and a 38.9°C fever. “I started shaking. I had cold and hot rushes,” he says. “I was sitting by the phone all night long thinking: ‘Should I call 911?’”
Hutchison's symptoms resolved after 12 hours. But, he says, “Nobody prepared me for the severity of this.”

So basically, you're advocating for letting a serious disease, that has devastated whole lives and economies, and ruined education for multiple generations, you're advocating for it to run wild just because of rare cases of reactogenic effects that resolve after a few hours anyway?!
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Kallisto
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(Original post by MagneticNorth)
"Calm Down"... known to be one of the finest debating techniques :rolleyes:

If you follow the link to reference [33] for the last bit of your extract on "Strong reactogenic effects". It'll take you here. Because...well, context!
Here goes an extract:
"This summer, computational biologist Luke Hutchison volunteered for a trial of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine. But after the second injection, his arm swelled up to the size of a “goose egg,” Hutchison says. He can't be sure he got the vaccine and not a placebo, but within a few hours, Hutchison, who was healthy and 43, was beset by bone and muscle aches and a 38.9°C fever. “I started shaking. I had cold and hot rushes,” he says. “I was sitting by the phone all night long thinking: ‘Should I call 911?’”
Hutchison's symptoms resolved after 12 hours. But, he says, “Nobody prepared me for the severity of this.”

So basically, you're advocating for letting a serious disease, that has devastated whole lives and economies, and ruined education for multiple generations, you're advocating for it to run wild just because of rare cases of reactogenic effects that resolve after a few hours anyway?!
I think that this discussion will never come to an end, if I answer to your replies again and again. So can you just accept that we have different views on the vaccines? I don't think that it is managed so easily by mRNA virus, neither the risks nor the effectiveness. Despite this, I think that the mRNA method is a good one. Let us test the vaccine, let us see what it can do against the virus. And if it really works in that way it is expected in the next weeks and months, I will change my mind.
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