can someone summarise the findings of this article?

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shireen1212
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#1
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#1
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3929633/

what are the findings overall in terms of the stability of the drinks and mainly the detection
please keep it simple as I am finding this quite difficult
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ArTeMiS2004
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#2
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(Original post by shireen1212)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3929633/

what are the findings overall in terms of the stability of the drinks and mainly the detection
please keep it simple as I am finding this quite difficult
benzodiazepines have a short detection window when they are in the blood (only 48 hours), and urine (96 hours), however they are detected in the hair for years or even months depending on how long the sample is. more research is recommended into other ways of detecting benzodiazepines as blood and urine have such a small window for detection, and lots of people wait longer than this to report a rape or possible drug facilitated sexual assaults.
it is recommended to store blood samples with possible traces of benzodiazepines at -20 degrees celsius to minimise concentration loss of the drug.
it been proven that clinical or forensic specimens should be refrigerated or stored at -20 degrees celsius.
there’s a lack of research in the stability of benzodiazepines over time in different drinks.
a GC-MS method has been used to test common drinks and stimulate casework samples stored under different controlled conditions with different time frames.
I hope this helps a bit !!
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ArTeMiS2004
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#3
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(Original post by ArTeMiS2004)
benzodiazepines have a short detection window when they are in the blood (only 48 hours), and urine (96 hours), however they are detected in the hair for years or even months depending on how long the sample is. more research is recommended into other ways of detecting benzodiazepines as blood and urine have such a small window for detection, and lots of people wait longer than this to report a rape or possible drug facilitated sexual assaults.
it is recommended to store blood samples with possible traces of benzodiazepines at -20 degrees celsius to minimise concentration loss of the drug.
it been proven that clinical or forensic specimens should be refrigerated or stored at -20 degrees celsius.
there’s a lack of research in the stability of benzodiazepines over time in different drinks.
a GC-MS method has been used to test common drinks and stimulate casework samples stored under different controlled conditions with different time frames.
I hope this helps a bit !!
the GC-MS method was carried out after derivatisation that allowed temazepam to be identified, but diazepam and flunitrazepam didn’t need derivatisation to be identified.
an injection without the derivatisation of temazepam resulted in the drugs decomposition as it is known to be thermally labile.
the data of the standard drugs and the drugs extracted were identical, which allowed detection and quantification of the drugs.
the kruskal-wallis U test was used to determine whether there was a significant difference between the results that were stored at different temperatures. for diazepam there was no significant difference between the results obtained after storage at room temperature and at 4°C in any beverage except J2O.
when J2O was at room temperature there was evidence of diazepam degradation (the cause was not investigate further)
for flunitrazepam significant differences were observed after storage under both conditions in wine and J2O - instability is not linked to the sample pH and alcoholic content because they both have the same pH, the wine is 12.5% v/v ethanol, J2O is alcohol free.
the stability of benzodiazepines depends on the type of beverage they were dissolved in.
J2O showed significant differences in the different storage conditions.
factors which might potentially impact upon the stability of benzodiazepines in a beverage are pH, alcohol concentration, extraction and analysis. results do not show any pattern related to them in the Kruskal-Wallis U significance tests.
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ArTeMiS2004
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#4
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#4
(Original post by shireen1212)
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3929633/

what are the findings overall in terms of the stability of the drinks and mainly the detection
please keep it simple as I am finding this quite difficult
just realising how long this explanation is but i hope it helps !!
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tinygirl96
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#5
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#5
According to that article one of them has a limited life. The others take longer to depart. Data collected was very identical in nature and drinking loads of alcohol will affect the set of results. Also one of the clinical tests was used to demonstrate the difference between the results and the storage conditions. Bear that in mind. Yes more research is needed to find any links etc. Use the information which is given above as fodder. Find some patterns and see if they impact findings.
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shireen1212
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#6
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(Original post by artemis2004)
the gc-ms method was carried out after derivatisation that allowed temazepam to be identified, but diazepam and flunitrazepam didn’t need derivatisation to be identified.
An injection without the derivatisyou ation of temazepam resulted in the drugs decomposition as it is known to be thermally labile.
The data of the standard drugs and the drugs extracted were identical, which allowed detection and quantification of the drugs.
The kruskal-wallis u test was used to determine whether there was a significant difference between the results that were stored at different temperatures. For diazepam there was no significant difference between the results obtained after storage at room temperature and at 4°c in any beverage except j2o.
When j2o was at room temperature there was evidence of diazepam degradation (the cause was not investigate further)
for flunitrazepam significant differences were observed after storage under both conditions in wine and j2o - instability is not linked to the sample ph and alcoholic content because they both have the same ph, the wine is 12.5% v/v ethanol, j2o is alcohol free.
The stability of benzodiazepines depends on the type of beverage they were dissolved in.
J2o showed significant differences in the different storage conditions.
Factors which might potentially impact upon the stability of benzodiazepines in a beverage are ph, alcohol concentration, extraction and analysis. Results do not show any pattern related to them in the kruskal-wallis u significance tests.
you are an angel thank you so much xxx
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ArTeMiS2004
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#7
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(Original post by shireen1212)
you are an angel thank you so much xxx
you’re welcome !!! it was actually nice to have something to read about !!
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