As biology aqa urgent help needed or i will suffer i am so stupid :-:

Watch
Maxistan YT
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
The question is in the image file below plz help me !
Attached files
0
reply
justagirltbh
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
The rate of transpiration can be calculated by measuring the distance travelled by an air bubble in a capillary tube over a given time. The faster the bubble moves, the greater the rate of water uptake – and so the greater the assumed rate of transpiration.
0
reply
Tolgash
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
I swear you always have the most dramatic titles.
1
reply
justagirltbh
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by Tolgash)
I swear you always have the most dramatic titles.
LMAOOOOOOOO theyre literally answers he/she can google tbh just type in how to calculate the rate of water movement . bloody heck
1
reply
Maxistan YT
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Tolgash)
I swear you always have the most dramatic titles.
0
reply
Maxistan YT
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by Ruqaiyahhhh_)
LMAOOOOOOOO theyre literally answers he/she can google tbh just type in how to calculate the rate of water movement . bloody heck
True but googling doesn't help much as half the answers aren't related to the spec meaning it's jargon and not concise compared to student room answers
0
reply
justagirltbh
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Maxistan YT)
True but googling doesn't help much as half the answers aren't related to the spec meaning it's jargon and not concise compared to student room answers
yeah i guess are you in year 11?
0
reply
Maxistan YT
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by Ruqaiyahhhh_)
The rate of transpiration can be calculated by measuring the distance travelled by an air bubble in a capillary tube over a given time. The faster the bubble moves, the greater the rate of water uptake – and so the greater the assumed rate of transpiration.
Where does the fact of air bubbles being formed come from?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (90)
64.75%
I don't have everything I need (49)
35.25%

Watched Threads

View All