Academic reference for UCAS application

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immie36
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My daughter is studying for her A levels with an online learning provider who are supplying an academic reference, collating her individual subject tutor references. They have structured their reference so that they have three separate sections for each of her subjects. Is it usual practice to do this or are the individual subject references usually rolled into one comprehensive statement incorporating input from all tutors?

Having supported my daughter in writing her personal statement, I know that it should be written in a certain way and students should build a strong case demonstrating with examples and evidence what makes them a good candidate and that they have the skills, knowledge and enthusiasm to excel in their proposed course of study. Is this what universities, especially Russell Group universities expect with references? The college reference has great predicted grades and makes general statements about my daughter's ability and enthusiasm etc, but doesn't include specific examples.

Also, the college have added a disclaimer type statement stating that although they are providing the statement, in accordance with their policy, "it is given on the basis that you must rely on your own judgement." This struck me as odd for an academic reference and more
appropriate for an employment reference by to cover themselves. Is this usual? Appreciate any advice. Thanks in advance.
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darrenb12345
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I'm going through the same thing, My online learning provider has said I need to pass a certain number of units before the January 16th deadline. Maybe could a past school / college give any sort of reference If this is the case? I'm not too sure who can and I'm stuck in the same boat
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Admit-One
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In brief, no, there is nothing alarming in what you have written, (I am an admissions coordinator for a RG uni).
(Original post by immie36)
They have structured their reference so that they have three separate sections for each of her subjects. Is it usual practice to do this or are the individual subject references usually rolled into one comprehensive statement incorporating input from all tutors?
Yes, this is a very common format. IE. "Subject teacher for SUBJECT states that..." etc. It's not necessary to reformat these to present them as coming from one person, and it's very normal for say a year head or personal tutor to collate comments in this way.
(Original post by immie36)
Having supported my daughter in writing her personal statement, I know that it should be written in a certain way and students should build a strong case demonstrating with examples and evidence what makes them a good candidate and that they have the skills, knowledge and enthusiasm to excel in their proposed course of study. Is this what universities, especially Russell Group universities expect with references? The college reference has great predicted grades and makes general statements about my daughter's ability and enthusiasm etc, but doesn't include specific examples.
Again, this is the distinction between a personal statement and reference that we most often see. The PS should demonstrate a clear, genuine interest in the course being applied to, with examples beyond the standard curriculum. The reference is a more general comment on the academic capability and suitability of the candidate for Higher Education. The ref can list examples where it is appropriate, (eg. extra curriculars, competition results, relevant volunteering etc), but so long as they are covered in one or the other, it's not necessary for the ref to 'verify' them.
(Original post by immie36)
Also, the college have added a disclaimer type statement stating that although they are providing the statement, in accordance with their policy, "it is given on the basis that you must rely on your own judgement." This struck me as odd for an academic reference and more appropriate for an employment reference by to cover themselves. Is this usual?
We do see it more commonly nowadays. As you say, it is more a disclaimer that the info is correct to the best of their knowledge. It's not concerning to see, as unis have always relied on their own judgment. It's a bit redundant, akin to a professional reference saying "but please conduct your own recruitment process".
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immie36
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Thank you SO much for your comprehensive reply. It's very helpful and I really appreciate you taking the time to address my concerns.
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Admit-One
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(Original post by immie36)
Thank you SO much for your comprehensive reply. It's very helpful and I really appreciate you taking the time to address my concerns.
No problem at all and best of luck with your daughter's application
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immie36
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(Original post by Admit-One)
No problem at all and best of luck with your daughter's application
Hello! I thought you might like to know that my daughter has now received offers from all the universities she applied to, including UCL, LSE and King's. Thanks again for your advice
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Admit-One
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(Original post by immie36)
Hello! I thought you might like to know that my daughter has now received offers from all the universities she applied to, including UCL, LSE and King's. Thanks again for your advice
Thank you for the update and your kind words. That’s great news, she’s in the enviable position of having to choose between several very good uni’s. Remind her that her offers are safe now and she has up until her reply deadline on Track to pick a Firm and Insurance choice.
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